Return to the Native Plants Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Posted by dandy_line 4a-Mn (My Page) on
Sun, Dec 9, 07 at 14:43

I thought I would open this subject on my system for killing Buckthorn here in Mn. I have been working on my 3 acre plot for 5 years now trying to kill it all. There were about 50 large trees and many more small shrubs when I started. Cutting down the trees and shrubs opened up the canopy and subsequently, the plants suckered with 50 times more plants and the dormant seeds in the ground added thousandns more. So, my system now is to use strong doses of 2-4-d. I can get 65% 2-4-d at Fleet Farm for about $16/gal. Using a strength around 2%, I get the new growth in April and May before the native plants come up. This pretty well kills the new growth and most of the plant.
So, along with pulling by hand, digging with shovel, and dousing with 2-4-d, I estimate my total kill will be around 100,000 plants by the time I'm done(another 5 years, maybe).


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I had a similar problem when I moved to this property (2 acres). I currently have little to no buckthorn because I have an even bigger problem...DEER. They eat everything that's not toxic including the buckthorn. I'd rather have your problem than deer.

But I digress. Try concentrated roundup. When you cut a tree or plant of buckthorn, paint the roundup on the FRESH CUT. It is absorbed directly into the sap stream and gos to the root. this not only kills the plant but prevents suckering without the risk to neighboring plants.

Applying 2-4D, which is soil active can be absorbed by the roots of neighboring plants even if they're dormant and can cause damage.

Good luck!


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Roundup makes a new "woody" plant killer, be sure and get that one instead of the original one. Brush-b-Gon is another good product.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Ahhhh killing Buckthorn, one of my favorite subjects (not really).

I don't have 100,000 to kill but at least a thousand or two, if you include seedlings. Both Common Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) and Glossy/European Buckthorn (Frangula alnus aka Rhamnus frangula). Common Buckthorn grows as more of a small tree, Glossy Buckthorn as a multi-stemmed upright shrub. Both are a real PITA.

Once I tried to dig out a medium-sized Buckthorn. Having dug out at least a dozen mature Burning Bush and Shrub Honeysuckles, I figured it would be doable. NEVER AGAIN. The roots are like freakin' concrete.

So I needed to attack these suckers another way. I spent six weeks this summer, a couple hours per day, cutting the Oriental Bittersweet and Buckthorn on my 1.25 acre lot. I cut the woody stems as close to the ground as possible, then apply Triclopyr concentrate to the stems AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE. Unfortunately, the herbicide is a necessary step, as you discovered Buckthorn will vigorously resprout from the stump. I use a bow saw and a squeeze bottle and elbow grease. Cut, apply a little herbicide. Cut, apply a little herbicide.

Crawling around in the bushes, getting hot, dirty and sweaty. Stumbled on a yellow jacket nest and got stung several times one day. Most of the cut vines and stalks I leave in place. Some I have piled as brush piles for the wildlife, and some I will burn. Burning takes place in the middle of a patch of Oriental Bittersweet or other invasives, hoping to burn some of it out.

I also purchased a medium-sized Weed Wrench to help pull out smaller sized shrubs and saplings. Weed wrenches are great!!

Here is what a stump and cuttings look like when I'm done with them -


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Buckthorn's real weakness is in its aggressiveness. It is the first to green up in the Spring so that makes it easy to identify and kill. Also, I only spray 2-4-d on it before anything else wakes up so I minimize the damage to native specie(which are mostly missing now anyway).
I don't have the patience to try to eliminate this stuff any other way, nor a long enough lifetime!
It's surprising to see the rejuvenation of wildflowers once this stuff is gone.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

You want to do a cut close to the ground like in the pic then do a Basil app of (farm grade) Round up , Mark with orange paint and come back in a month and hit it again . Put the round up on with a paint brush.

Jeff


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Once cut to the ground. Try covering the area around the rootzone with heavy, clear plastic secure with stone or bricks..if it gets sun..even better.. This will starve the rootstock. Be diligent with any opportunistic shoot that appears. Remember, they need leaves to stay alive. Start at one corner of your property and progress from there because it can't all be done at once. Meanwhile, locate any native perennials and grasses that are still there because they are your seed stock..transplanting is risky therefore start collecting seeds to replant. I've used this method..it works and it's another piece of ammunition on the forefront. Good luck.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

2,4D Amine (aka Garlon) is a relatively toxic herbicide. If temperatures are at or above freezing glyphosate, preferably in an aquatic-safe formulation such as Rodeo, AquaNeat or AquaMaster applied to the stumps at a high concentration (50%) will have similar effects. The oil based solution of Garlon is best saved for stump application during winter months, which, by the way, is the best time to cut brush to avoid collateral damage, and those pesky yellow-jackets! Although 2,4D amine works well as a foliar spray, it is a more hazardous chemical, so I would stay away from this application, and go with the standard low concentration (2.5-3%) application of glyphosate.

If you have a small population (considerably fewer then 100,000) you can eventually kill them if you continually snip the above-ground stems as they re-sprout. Only takes a few months if done regularly.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Certainly 2,4 D is more toxic than Roundup. However roundup's intended use is for herbacious vegetation and not woody vegetation.

I would rather use one carefullly applied, effective treatment of a woody herbicide, than multiple less effective treatments of roundup.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Recent research has shown that Round-Up is actually more effective then Garlon for basal bark treatments on buckthorn. I believe the research was done with these brand name products, and not just the base chemicals (glyphosate and 2-4D Amine respectively) though we can probably assume the same is true for generic versions, and aquatic approved versions depending on how much the surfactant and other additives effect the performance of the glyphosate. I believe that Monsanto is changing the labels on Round-Up to reflect this newly approved use.

Read the research article for more info:
http://home.comcast.net/~oliver.pergams/PergamsNorton.pdf

Also, myself and others have used glyphosate for stump treatment of honeysuckle for quite a while with good results. However, as I said before, in the dead of winter a oil based herbicide like Garlon is a practical and effective choice.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

As the previous poster noted, winter is actually a very good time to apply herbicide to woody vegetation as the sap is still moving down into the roots. I suggest you take advantage of this opportunity while it lasts. As soon as the sap begins to move up the tree, it is less eager to take up the herbicide.

Best of Luck

Chuck


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

My appologies.

I'd just like to point out an error I made in the above discussion. Everywhere I wrote "2-4D", imagine that I wrote "Triclopyr". Note that the study I reference above does state that glyphosate is more effective then both 2,4-D and Triclopyr".

I don't know why I have such a mental block about this, I have mixed up those chemicals in my head a couple times now.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

As far as I know I don't have Buckthorn to worry about as of yet. But my invasives experience brings a few questions to mind:
1. Is the area totally overrun?
2. If so, are you looking to "nuke" the whole area and start again?
3. If you have written off the area in its current state then you can do all the dramatic and horrible things that you would not do if you still have some plants you are trying to save.

I have used rye grain as a competitor to invasives in some areas with reasonably good results but certainly not perfection. I don't know how if it would work against Buckthorn but it's a thought. Eventually the rye grain is killed off and natives are planted in. You can repeatedly seed with rye grain and subsequently herbicide an area until you have some control. Rye grain can be seeded in late fall which is a bonus. The Weed Wrench is a great tool but with so many plants to remove you probably have to go chemical. The plus side of your situation is that by germinating and then killing the Buckthorn seeds and seedlings you are removing the bulk of the "ticking bomb" that is laying in your soil.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Just saw an article in a recent magazine about a "wonderful" garden in CO which featured a narrow-leaf buckthorn, later calling it a threadleaf buckthorn. Is this the same tree that is giving you all such grief? I don't think we have it here, but it sounds as if it is awful. Oh, the garden was described as a natural woodland themed one.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Well-it appears my original posting has a life of its own. Snow is still on the gorund here in Z4a Mn but in about 2 more weeks I'll be back at it again. All of the large tree types have been felled by me in the past and its only the suckers that are my problem now. For me, early Spring is when I get my chance to nail them. Their nice tender new growth is what absorbs the 2-4D and by June they're pretty much gone. But having so much of it out there makes it difficult to get all of it in any one year. I'm hoping to see wild flowers in the areas that got nuked last year.
Thanks for all the suggestions. I do pull them out by had during the summer too.
Now-anybody know how to kill off Canary Reed Grass?


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

NCrescue are you thinking of Lanceleaf Buckthorn (Rhamnus lanceolata)? That is a native Buckthorn. The bad ones in our area are Glossy Buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and Common Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica).

I was thinking about a new "plan of attack" for some of the remaining woody invasives, including the Buckthorn, Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, etc.

Recently I was listening to Peter Alden speak and he touched on Buckthorn. He said you don't have to cut it all the way down. Instead you can makes cuts into the trunk at the base and apply the herbicide topically. Then it get absorbed by the roots and the shrub/tree dies. You would then be left with a skeleton of a shrub.

Not sure what kind of cuts he was talking about?? But it sounds like less work and then you don't have all this cut brush laying around. I would like to leave some of the dead shrubbery standing to use in thicket areas and also as trellises to grow native vines.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I don't know. It sounds like more work to me. Starting up the chainsaw and whacking it down is a lot easier I think.

To give you an idea of how bad this stuff is, I have a grassy area(a lawn actually), that I neglected to mow for 2 summers. In that short period of time, I must have another 1000 3' tall shrubs growing. These will get the poison treatment in another 3 weeks or so. It seems wherever there is an opening, the seeds are just waiting for their chance in the sun. I believe the seeds will still be viable for another 50 years.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I haven't noticed anyone mentioning burning as part of the solution. I too have a bad buckthorn problem in our burr oak woods that I attack first with cutting the larger stuff to the ground and applying herbacide to the stump. Also, for the last three years, we have been burning the woods in early April before the herbacious natives come up. Burning in the woods seems very easy compared to an open prairie. The fire burns slowly, and if there isn't enough fuel on the ground, it may not be a complete burn. It helps to have a little wind to help you. The result is that the infinite number of small woody stems get girdled by the fire. A good percentage of them re-sprout at the base, but further burning seems to be winning the battle. That, and more cutting and poisoning.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Terrene, Let's hope it WAS the native one. Oh, I just saw an ad for a cosmetic (face cream) that contains, according to the label, buckthorn oil. Maybe you guys are missing out on an economic opportunity. (Grin)


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Have you seen or tried the buckthorn baggie? Seems like a good alternative to chemicals. A basic website is up for it at www.buckthornbaggie.com I could not figure out how to order from them though


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Heh, missed this old conversation. Buckthorn is the bane of many a woods in my area. First off, I'd suggest that methods like the "Buckthorn Baggy" above, and the plastic sheet on the ground smothering method are wildly ineffective for bad infestations. Sure, if you've got a plant or two, but then, there would be numerous ways to get rid of them.

A few thoughts on control: Cut/treat applications are a mainstay. The method involves cutting the stem low on the plant and immediately painting or daubing concentrated herbicide on the cut surface. Glyphosate (Roundup) and Triclopyr (Garlon) are the two primary chems for this treatment. Stronger solutions are used for cut/treat than would be mixed for foliar application-all the way up to a 50% concentration of concentrate in water, or in the case of triclopyr, either diesel oil or with the newer formulations, various vegetable oils.

Another is basal bark. In this method, triclopyr (Does anybody know if glyphosate works for this?) is sprayed on the lower 20 inches or so of stem. Again, a higher concentration is used than would be for normal foliar application.

For both of these techniques, there is a timing issue: Basically, with plants moving sap down into their root systems in fall and winter, that makes both of these techniques work better at those times of year.

Finally, and it has been alluded to in this thread, the fact that buckthorn both greens out earlier than many of our desirable plants, and stays green longer into the fall, means that normal 3% or so foliar spray applications can be used in many cases to rid the site of this plant. Just be aware, there are some natives and desirable species that do also green up very early. Be careful!

Then there's the whole rebound effect. OP mentioned this: You get rid of a bunch of junk growing in your stand and now with the increased light, numerous buckthorn seeds sprout and start the cycle all over again. There is no magical solution for this that I'm aware of. You simply must do battle with this next crop of buckthorn. One thing I have noticed is that young buckthorn plants are readily pulled out of the ground. Of course, if you've got thousands, that will quickly become unbearable.

I hate what this plant-especially common buckthorn here in Wisconsin-has done to many of our woodlands, at least in the southern half or so of the state. It seems that in more northern areas, it has not gotten nearly the foothold as around here where I live, in east central WI. Here it's just ridiculous. It is heartening though to see that the OP has noticed that many of the native, desirable plants do rebound. Happy killing!

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Fiddln Joe is right about burning... I would do an initial thinning, but then follow up with fire... it much easier and targeted. Our native species have adapted to fire, buckthorn has not.

Of course if you aren't familiar with fire, you can hire trained people to do it for you.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Agree with you to an extent there Joe, but.........there's always a "but".

What has happened within the native landscaping industry is a sort of homogenization, all in the direction towards pyric plant communities-prairies, oak savannahs, and other fire-dependant woodland forms. That's fine as far as it goes, but it doesn't go nearly far enough.

For one example, I give you the northern hardwood forest plant community type. This forest type covers vast acreage in, you guessed it, the northern tier states, like where I live. Fire rotation intervals for this type are upwards of 400 years. Clearly, fires did happen in these forests, but with nowhere near the frequency that most prairie enthusiasts are wont to believe. So while I do like what fire can do to improve certain plant community types, its use is both difficult and often unwarranted in other situations.

I know just a bit about this stuff. I could dig up more examples of ecosystems that were never particularly fire-dependant, but I bet you see my point. And in truth, here in east-central WI, we are on the north side of the "tension zone" an ecotone wherein one plant community type transitions over to another, and I'll leave it to you to guess which side we're on! Yup, the side that hardly ever burned.

I do "native restoration" work as a part of my occupation. I've found that so far, there seems to be almost an unwillingness to think outside of the prairie/oak savannah box. I understand more than a little about how this might have come about. But I cannot abide letting this thinking go unchallenged, even if it's just on a hobbyists forum. Don't worry though, I save my best vitriol for professional engagements!

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill v2.0

Joeypyeweed, I just re-read my post directly above this one. I apologize if it seems as though I'm yelling at you. I'm not, or at least, that's not my intent. I will readily admit that I find it frustrating, the way the native landscaping industry has developed, with its one-size-fits-all approach, and I think I addressed that in the post. But I do agree with you that where A) Fire is appropriate, and B) Where fire will burn, it can be an effective anti-buckthorn tool. Truth is, a patch of bottomland hardwood forest my son owns in the area to the south of where I live, is completely overrun by BT. Not sure we would ever be able to get a burn going there, but I did mention it as one possibility. For now, we're looking at heavy and frequent herbiciding.

Just didn't want to start something unintended.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I agree that fire isn't appropriate for every habitat.

But if a person is trying to control an invasive non-native species, a controlled burn is an easy effective way to manage it. Controlled fire is also great for garlic mustard.

One can burn a bottomland forest, but you have to catch it at just the right time ... and typically a bottomland forest didn't burn as frequently as an upland forests, so they have more species less resistant to fire... so you do need to have someone who knows what they are doing... which is what I recommended.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Indeed; I work in close concert with some of the leading native landscaping companies in my region on a frequent basis, with prescribed burns being one of the treatments we frequently call for, this being in prairie plantings. We have broached the subject of fire in some of our wooded properties also. I would be interested to learn more about using fire to control just those species you mention-common buckthorn and garlic mustard. And with regard to my son's property, those are also the main problem plants present. So, if you have additional commentary on that aspect, I'd enjoy hearing more.

And this takes us right back to my initial point-and yours too, BTW-that even the very best native landscaping companies are notably less adept once you leave the prairie/oak savannah box. I'm still in the midst of exploring just what exactly the capabilities are, and it would not be appropriate to mention names. I'm guessing you would know of the guys we've contracted with. They're very good-there's reasons they've once again come in with the best proposal-but again, all or very nearly all knowledge is tilted towards plant communities which exist or formerly existed south of this vegetation tension zone I'm talking about. Get into the transition zone, like where I live and do most of my work, let alone just a few miles north, where you would find yourself north of this zone, and it seems -and I want to be proven wrong about this-that only the same prescriptions come into play. We, and by we I mean the ecological restoration industry, need a more diverse approach, to reflect the diverse plant communities which are out there.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I read this thread and found that I have about 12 Buckthorns in my hard. So thanks to the OP for this thread. I will attempt to get rid of them this spring and plant some indiginous trees and shrubs.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

By all means, it is far better to deal with them at this stage-you can axctually count the number of plants!-than in the more typical situation, where they've become too numerous to count. Only caveat: I don't know where you live although your screen name suggests Maine possibly, but there are native buckthorns in existence in N. America. A positive ID should be made before attempting control.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Wisconsitom I live in Ohio but I do love Maine. It's actually worse than I thought. I have hundreds of Buckthorns maybe more. Too many to count. I spent the day cutting some down and will apply Round-Up to the stems tomorrow. The biggest clump I cut today was about 12 feet tall and 4 feet wide.

They are everywhere and there are at least 9 large clumps left. The rest are smaller. What makes it a major PITA is that some are growing where the original owner placed trees or shrubs. For example I worked on one patch that was growing around a very large tree. That tree also had many large wild roses (some climbing twelve feet up the tree) and poison ivy all intermixed with the Buckthorn. It was a ring of pain (for me) around the tree.

The good news is that most of it is located at the fence line and borders of the yard. Mowing has kept it out of the main front and back yard. Except for the very front by the drainage ditch. It actually screens the house from being viewed from the road. I was able to find a river birch inside part of that screen and uncovered it. So I can view part of the road now. Also nice to find daffodils as well. DH and our friend will attack that area with a chain saw later this spring. DH won't let me use a chain saw because I have been known to be careless with power tools.

Oh well........


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Yes, chain saws are certainly best used by experienced and careful operators. I just cut down a large area of sandbar willow on our land this weekend. Major work for sure!

I'd like to alert you-if you're not already aware-that the cut/treat method works best when two things are in place: One, the work is being performed in the fall or first half of winter, when sap is moving downward into root systems of targeted plants, and secondly, that the chemical be applied more or less immediately after the cut is made, before the exposed tissues become less receptive to the chemical solution. You may as well still proceed as you planned, but in the future, it would be worthwhile for you to tighten up on these details, for best results.

In any case, once you've achieved some success, I think you will be very pleased at what plants are able to grow-some are already there as you've found out-once the BT is gone. Good luck!

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Thanks for the advice wisconsitom. So it looks like I will be mostly controlling growth vs. eradication until fall comes along. How early in fall would be effective to re-treat the stumps?


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Early fall is fine-say September-ish. And then really, right on through to late Feb. or so. One situation that comes up in this winter version of this task is freezing-up sprayer nozzles, etc. (if sprayers are being used). Thus, the Garlon-type herbicides, which are dissolved into either fuel oil, kerosene, or various veg. oils, can be a better option at that time of year than say, water-based glyphosate(Roundup). But either way, you've got a huge window for cut/treat.

Another thing, and we've touched on it in this thread, is the fact that common buckthorn greens out early and stays green later into the year than most native plants. Most, but not all! So, what this means is that there are also opportunities for regular 2% or 3% foliar applications of glyphosate during these times of year, provided one has made darn sure there are no desirable plants on the forest floor that are also still green (or in the case of spring, already greened out). So that can be another time and tech. to attack this crap plant. True, foliar sprays don't always kill buckthorn outright, but they sure do knock it back.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Wisconsitom your advice is priceless. Thanks so much!! :)


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I'm glad to know this post still has life. I no longer own the property with the 100,000 Buckthorns but I still meet folks who are just starting to deal with it. One thing that is so hard to get across is that the sooner it is attacked, the shorter the time frame to finish the job. If, the Buckthorn has fruited for a number of years, then there are that many more years of work to finally eradicate it. The soil had become permeated with seeds and once the parent tree is removed, guess what-the canopy has been opened up and the seeds germinate. Continually. The second generation seems to be more difficult to remove because they blanket the ground shading everything else. And on it goes...


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

You're not wrong, Dandy Line. I wish more people saw the plain truth of it. I've got a brother-in-law who recently reported that buckthorn is now present on his hunting land. He was already defeatist about it, not planning to do anything. Yet he continues to plant trees, etc.....stuff he wants to see in the future, not seeing how these two views are ultimately incompatible.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill in

Moved from WI to IL in 2003. I had no idea what buckthorn was. Once I was informed I had 14 trees each more than 20 feet high removed from this city lot in Park Ridge, IL. I pay someone to help me with my garden now that my MS limits my abilities. It has been a 10 year fight. Here is my problem; I live on a corner and the homes to the North of me and West of me are owned by the same family. They have a huge amount of VERY large buckthorn trees on their lots. They are not interested in any kind of gardening - they barely cut their grass. My gardening buddy is a professional horticulturist and uses commercial products on my gardens. He created a no planting zone on the North and West property lines that he treats regularly with herbicides to keep the growth back from the neighbors. I have looked everywhere for some kind of regulation that could help me but everything I find states that it is illegal to sell or plant buckthorn in IL but nothing about forcing anyone to remove it. What can I do? Any suggestions would be most appreciated. Thanks! Marge


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I feel that, Marge. In fact, yours is the typical situation. My son, in Cedarburg WI, is attempting to eradicate, or at less hold back, the buckthorn on his f acres. But all around are folks who either don't know, don't care, or a little bit of both. There's no magic asnwer that I'm aware of. One must simply take up the fight, and keep at it for a long time. Some improvement can still be had over time.

I wish there were ordinances for this plant and other serious invasives, similar to the "weed ordinances" which many communities do have, prohibiting Canada thistle, etc. Buckthorn is, IMO, easily more a problem than even a crap plant like thistle!

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

There is a new product out to help this situation with buckthorn. It is the buckthorn baggie. Made to put over the buckthorn stumps and zip tie it onto the stump. No chemicals and no pulling up the plants. website is www.buckthornbaggie.com


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

I am working on removing the buckthorn from our 7 acre woods around our house- it seems almost overwhelming in some areas. The picture shows one of the worst areas- nothing but buckthorn and a carpet of seedlings. I am doing the cut stump- treat stump method but I am unsure with this area if I should go after the seedlings first with an herbicide before I let any sun in by cutting the mature trees. Which would you take out first? Also is there some kind of woodland grass that can be planted that could keep the stinging nettles and common burdock from taking over- we have a lot of those in the sunnier areas of the woods.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

You might want to investigate having a native restoration-type contractor come in with a "Feeco". Sorry about using a proprietary name for what is a general type of machine, but that's all I know it by. It''s a machine, often on crawlers, which has a grinding head on the front, used to clear land (Which application I hate) but which is ideal for situations of heavy buckthorn infestation. Not a cheap option, but you're looking at $$ no matter what, even if it's just your own time spent. These things can really do a number on a stand of crap plants like that, leading the way to your being able to get a handle on the problem. Check it out.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Thanks Tom for the suggestion but I already bought the Extractigator, a chainsaw and the Garlon 4 for the stumps so I'm committed to the DIY. Made some progress last night and this morning busting a hole into the center of it. It's so hard to get it to come down because it is so close together. My husband is cutting wood nearby- we have fallen ash and oaks from a tornado three years ago and so he came and took pity on me and cut down the worst ones.


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Yes, you're really going at it! One thing I can see-and you will agree, I'm sure-there is satisfaction in each little section cleared. Now for the million dollar question, and I apologize if you've already stated such-what, if anything, do you plan to encourage on these newly-cleared areas? All that sunlight is going to encourage explosive growth of something...whether it's something you want there or not. One of the aspects of buckthorn removal is, it's important to get that cleared ground occupied by something. The BT has huge numbers of seeds laying in waiting. At least those new BT seedlings are easy to pull out of the ground, or foliar spray while they're small.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Yes I am scared of the explosion and have been thinking about it. In the areas under the female BT there is a carpet of seedlings so I want to be able to foliar spray before planting anything and possibly injuring the desirables. I want native shrubs, wildflowers and grasses but the timing of planting them and being able to foliar spray the undesirables has me worried. Should I throw down some deer plot grasses to hold the spot before winter hits? Any suggestions?


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

You can foliar-spray BT long after nearly all "good" plants have gone dormant, due to its staying green so long into fall. And to some extent, it may green up before some of the native forbs, etc, although that is a lesser window, to be sure. So what I'm saying is, if you're equipped, you might want to get out there now and do some over the top spraying. One of the few good things about BT's early green-up/late senescence is this fact-it allows one to apply herbicides later than would otherwise be the case. And keep in mind, with cool temps this time of year, you might apply a chemical, say glyphosate (Roundup) and think it's not working. But be patient.....the plants should all be dead come spring.

+oM


 o
RE: 100,000 Buckthorns to kill

Thanks for the follow up. I'm going to get out this weekend and foliar spray all the knee high seedlings. Unfortunately this year's sprouts are already blanketed by leaves.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Native Plants Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here