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Long Island Coastal Tree suggestion

Posted by HamptonsJulie none (My Page) on
Tue, Jun 14, 11 at 17:37

I live directly on a bay with strong winds and sea spray. I need suggestions for trees to plant along my property line for privacy. I need something tall and not too wide, but dense. Any suggestions.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Long Island Coastal Tree suggestion

We use bayberry which has resinous scented leaves and produces little waxy berries that were used in Colonial times for making candles. Myrica pennsylvanica. Some sites say it grows to 5 ft. tall but ours (800 ft. from the ocean in RI) grow to more than 10. Not a solid hedge, though.
Too bad holly doesn't like salty air; that would have been perfect. Check out various junipers, cedars etc. If they are in the wind all the time, there may be distortion in growth and you might not get a solid straight privacy hedge.


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RE: Long Island Coastal Tree suggestion

Eastern Red Ceder is skinny and dense, and really tolerant of salt and sand.

White Pine is prettier but less dense.

I beg to differ about holly. My parents live on the coast and have lost trees to salt spray during hurricanes, but the holly on the ocean side of the house seems to do pretty well. (This spot only gets salt spray about once a year in major storms.)

Beach Plum and Bayberry are super salt tolerant but not very tall or dense. I've never seen them get to 10 feet.


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RE: Long Island Coastal Tree suggestion

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RE: Long Island Coastal Tree suggestion

I have a home three blocks from the ocean in New Jersey, about 40 miles south of NYC. The tree that has done the best for me, and I think would be a perfect screen, is Amelanchier "Autumn Brilliance," or probably any other cultivar of amelanchier. It withstood Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Irene, various blizzards and innumerable other storms. We had snow that drifted up to 6 or 7 feet, no problem. It produces a cloud of white flowers (although only briefly), in the spring, edible berries (although the birds usually get them first, and beautiful fall foliage.


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