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Seaweed in the Garden

Posted by Leasa 5 (My Page) on
Fri, Jun 18, 04 at 22:07

It is sow nice that we have this forum!

My neighbor has her clam and seaweed licenses and she was asking me if I could find out about seaweed used for the gardens.

Should it be used wet/green?

Should it be allowed to dry out?

What is the scoop on this great free reasource that we have in continual supply???

I said my garden web friends would know the answers....

Leasa

PS my family is visiting from Aroostook County for the weekend, they brought me loads of fiddleheads. My neighbor gave us clams to have steamers before super...what a deal! I gave her some of the fiddleheads Gram and Mom picked, YUMMY!!!!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

Hi Leasa
Ok, I'll ask...what are fiddleheads?
Alberta


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

To we Cape Codders, seaweed is GOLD!!! My kids and I collect it in the fall and put it in our compost (oak leaves, egg shells,veggie and fruit scraps, manure, alfafa, etc. In the spring and summer months we collect it again and use the dried seaweed to mulch with - and we keep adding it to our compost.

If you have a pick-up truck go early in the am and fill it - if not and you have an SUV 32 gallon barrels work but they get awfully heavey otherwise use heavey duty garbage bags fill and drag to your car.

Also many local dumps here on the Cape offer free compost too! Check yours maybe they offered compost too.

After three years of my Azalea bushes looking like they were dying I just saturated them with seaweed and made sure all dead wood was cut off this spring- woa finally goregous blooms!!!!

Good Luck
Happy Gardening!
Chantel :-)


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

I'm interested in seaweed for my compost...apparently, it's leagal to just take it from the shore??? Do I have to rinse the salt off before adding it to the compost? I normally mulch w/50-50 leaf mold/manure but would very much like to try adding seaweed to my mixture. How much is good to add? This is very nice...to have our own forum. I


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

Fiddleheads are the newly emerged fronds of ferns, and they're usually steamed or sauteed with butter.

We use seaweed, too, but usually in the fall. We collect it, spread it on the lawn to dry and then we actually use the mower with the leaf bag to dice it up, and collect it for distribution. It's GOLD for gardens.


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

Tricia- Yes here on the Cape its perfectly legal as the tourist and residents "hate" the seaweed on the beach. Before Memorial Day and the Fourth of July the towns bulldoze it off the beaches. I like to go early am or or late pm to gather it as we have the beach to ourselves and we can enjoy the beach while collecting. Some tourists yep think we are "stealing" - ugh but then they are the first ones to complain about all the seaweed on the beach and how "gross" it is. Go figure! Sometimes they ask us what we are doing with it but other figure its for gardening that is a nice chat. We are NOT stealing as like I said it's cleaned up by the town just before the two major summer holidays - I just wish they would dump it in my yard - that would save my back!!! Many many gardeners use seaweed here!

Also like mention - collect a good size load in the fall for either compost or just pile it up out of site for use in the spring.

I use old 32 gallon garbage barrels - I start with the oak leaves a
1/4 filled then fill half way with seaweed - then add the rest of the stuff I mentioned above - then add some water- then top with oak leaves -cover it- I stir it few times a week I am not pickey. I have four. barrels out of sight in a wooden large garbage bin. I put some moth balls around the barrels to keep away critters. I however have a place for just dumping seawweed in my yard for mulch. I hear many people do rinse it but it usually dry by the time I mulch and I just shake it real well. You could just hose down real well if you feel the salt may be too much for your plants. Check with your local nursery when buying plants and ask them about the seaweed. I have never heard of it doing any harm. I have save not only my azaleas but a few rose plants that I swore the winter killed now to find them growing well- and its the seaweed.

Good Luck
Remember to have some fun while spending some time at the beach! :-)


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

Oh,oh, I wish it wasn't Father's Day weekend...I can hardly wait to go beach combing for seaweed!!! This is exciting. Yeah, I imagine the tourists don't like it...I never thought about that. I didn't know the towns cleaned it up though...just thought the tides washed it away. I have a lot to learn about coastal living. Thanks so much for the help. I'm delighted to have our own forum.


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

You can use seaweed around the outside of ones garden to create a barrier for snails. I use it around my patatoe, beans and corn gardens and have great results. Then after the seaweed has been there a while I replace it by using it to till up my patatoes and then replenish the barrier with fresh seaweed...I just go across the street to get my seaweed, so I know I am spoiled.


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

Alberta, like Chelone said newly emerged ferns, but not just any ferns, the have to be baby ostrich ferns.

The are wicked yummy!

In Maine a permit is required for removing the live seaweed, someone with a clamming licence can take enough to cover the clams.

I'm not sure on the dead stuff.

Maine has lots of laws, regulations, fees and taxes other states do not have. Before you know it we will have a tax on breaking wind outside!

Leasa


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

  • Posted by BSG1 z7 NY (My Page) on
    Mon, Jun 21, 04 at 13:00

Does anyone know if we are allowed to "collect" seaweed from the beaches on Long Island - in particular I would be curious about the North Shore beaches.

Thanks in advance -

Beth


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

I hear you can buy it your local feed store. There's a feed store in Mastic/Shirley (Long Island) where we buy dog food, I'll keep an eye out for seaweed next time we're there.

Kelp is well known as an extremely beneficial food source both for plants and humans. I grew up eating the most delicious seaweed soup, very yummy!

Angie


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

Beth - check at your local town/city hall ( some one should be able to direct you to the right dept) to see if you need a permit or ask your local chamber of commerance. Here the seaweed on the beach is considered a nuisance to the tourists. The thought of having to buy natures gold is aweful. :-(

Angie - I am curious how much is the seaweed and how is it sold?

"Happy Gardening All!"


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

  • Posted by Cady 6b/Sunset34 MA (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 22, 04 at 12:39

Our beach is covered in it at low tide, particularly after a storm. When it's wet it's like lead, though. lol. If you have to haul it any distance, have a tractor or draft horse (or large husband or boyfriend or guy friends) with you.


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

  • Posted by Donn_ Z 7, seaside,NY (My Page) on
    Sat, Jun 26, 04 at 16:49

"Seaweed" is a broad term. The primary seaweed here is eelgrass, and when the wind blows from the S or SW, it blows up the canal, right to my back yard. It takes me about an hour to cover a 100' x 5' boardwalk, 12" deep with it. I rinse it down with freshwater, and let it dry in the sun, turning it with a fork occasionally, until it's dry. Then I shred it with a chipper/shredder, and it turns into fine dust, about 1/100th of it's original volume. It's an amazing nitrogen boost for your soil, but you can't apply it too heavily, or you'll burn your plants like a female dog burns the grass.

When I'm building lasagna beds (my primary method of bed building) I use it whole. Just rinse it and fork it onto the bed about 6" deep, and cover it with sawdust, shredded leaves, or some other brown.


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RE: Seaweed in the Garden

The seaweed should be soaked in freshwater to get rid of the sea salts.... you can use it fresh or dried..... but fresh will smell...... fresh is probably better though..... dried probably looses some nutrients.... you can make teas from it as well.... for the garden not for yourself!!!!!! Don't forget to save a few for pressing...... some are really interested in the art of pressing seaweed......:)


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