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Starting new plants from cuttings

Posted by rudysmallfry CT (My Page) on
Thu, Jul 1, 04 at 19:32

I'm going to my favorite beach tomorrow that has those pretty purple flowered bushes that I like. If I were to use the pruning shears that happen to be in my beach bag to "borrow" a few sprigs, how would I best go about establishing them a new plants? In other words, what's my best chance at getting them to sprout roots?


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

The only thing I ever really propogated from cuttings was Coleus and they're notoriously easy to root. Do you have rooting hormone? I use Rootone for my orchids from time to time, it's pretty good. Besides making a fresh cut just before you're ready to put it in water or dirt to root at home, dip it in water, and then dip it in the hormone so it sticks.

I'd be interested in hearing any other good suggestions because I just found out that rooting rose cuttings isn't as hard as I thought it was. I might try the same soon enough.


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

Are the purple flowering bushes Rugosa roses? I call em beach roses, because that's where you find them. If they are, they're tough to root from cuttings, but they sucker like mad. If you dig up a 12" sucker with a long root and keep it moist, it should transplant great. I have done this several times. If it's not rugosa, I don't know what to tell you!!! Rosemary


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

  • Posted by Claire z6b MA Coastal (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 3, 04 at 10:25

I agree that the suckers of rosa rugosa will transplant easily. The roses will also form rose hips (fruits) soon, if they haven't already. These look like little tomatoes and you can probably grow the seeds (unless they have to pass through a bird first).

The hips also make great jelly or jam.

picture of hips:
http://www.xs4all.nl/~aborne/pages/rosa_rugosa/rosa_rugosa9.htm

-Claire

Here is a link that might be useful: Rosa rugosa


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

Yeah they do look to be rugosa roses. They look just like that picture on the link above. I took a cutting for comparison purposes and plan to bring it over to the nursery tomorrow and see if it is in fact a rugosa rose.

It was pretty funny. I was all self conscious about having somebody see me stealing a sprig of the local flora. Then a huge bank of fog suddenly moved in and you couldn't see 5 feet in front of your face. I grabbed my clippers, took a little walk and did my work under the cover of fog.


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

Claire,
I think that is what I have growing in my yard probably from a bird dropping, they are green right now will they turn red? Do the birds eat them?

Stella


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

  • Posted by Claire z6b MA Coastal (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 4, 04 at 20:21

Lots of different types of roses have hips - they usually turn red or orange. Birds do eat them as do people. I don't know whether the birds consider rose hips a great treat or just something good to get them through the winter.

My mother used to make a great jam, and one year she and my aunt turned it into a terrific pancake syrup when it didn't gel properly.

-Claire

Here is a link that might be useful: Rose hips and recipes


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

Okay, I cheated. I went down to the local store and bought a Rogusa Rose. I got it for dirt cheap I guess since it's the middle of summer and a bad time to be planting. I put it in a nice sunny location where it could spread out at least 6' in any direction.

My question is, I put it where a dwarf spruce had died and dropped it's needles. I would think the soil is extremely acidic as a result. Do I need to amend the soil ph, or should I leave it alone since most roses like acidic soil?


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RE: Starting new plants from cuttings

  • Posted by Donn_ Z 7, seaside,NY (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 10, 04 at 20:59

Don't worry about the needles changing the Ph of the soil. It would take 20 years of a constant coating of pine needles breaking down in one small area, to change the Ph to any great degree.


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