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Stooling Catalpa

Posted by runktrun z7a MA (My Page) on
Sun, Mar 22, 09 at 18:47

On a recent long walk with Joe I stopped (much to his dismay) while under a Catalpa tree to admire looking up through the branches that are still holding on to the extra long seed pods making for terrific winter interest. This tree has wonderful large long blooming white flowers and great foliage but I immediately put the thought of purchasing this beauty out of my mind, as I dont have room in my landscape. Happily I was reading today that the Catalpa can be stooled (cut down to the ground) each winter to be kept as a smaller specimen. This lead me to wonder what other trees or large shrubs lend them selves to this process? Do you think I will be getting flowers? Has anyone tried this with Cotinus Coggygria?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Stooling Catalpa

I occasionally cut my Cotinus to the ground, and sacrifice that year's flowers in the hopes of getting more compact plants without the long pinwheels that normal pruning produces. For the particular variety that I have, it actually just makes them smaller but no more graceful, and I never like the results well enough to repeat the process the next year, so I do this about every 5 years or so.

Also, I admit that I still have a single volunteer Paulownia (Princess Tree) that I cut to the ground each year, specifically to prevent flowering (and seed production) and to produce large dramatic leaves.

In general, I really like to let plants grow into whatever they intend to be. I can admire topiaries and beech hedges that are limbed up and cut into formal floating squares, but I don't really want them in my own garden.


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

KT - I'll be an enabler . . .

Avant Gardens in North Dartmouth, MA sells a golden catalpal. They specifically mention in their online catalog that it is often stooled. From my reading, it becomes greener in summer, but the thought of those huge golden leaves in the spring, followed by the same large presence, but in a cooler green in summer . . . just yummy!

I have done mail order business with these folks and have been extemely pleased with their products, both woody and herbaceous.

An added thought - in general, spring blooming plants, if pruned late in the season won't bloom, so I assume that you wouldn't get blooms and seed pods from your catalpa. (but would you need them with that foliage?)

Here is a link that might be useful: avant gardens Catalpa 'aurea'


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Thanks Babs,
Now that I realize I would be pruning off the flowers/beans I am not certain I want to sacrifice some of my limited space, although the thought of large heart shaped yellow leaves is appealing. I will be joining dtd for the pruning work shop at Avant Gardens so the temptation to bring one home will be great. Any chance you might leave the granite state for the work shop?


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Unfortunately, KT, right now pressures of work and classes are keeping me busy enough so that I honestly could not justify the 5 hour round trip driving for a pruning workshop, even if I would also have the pleasure of meeting both you and DTD in person as well as seeing one of my favorite nurseries. One of these days I need to give a whole weekend to nurseries in that area, but it will have to wait until after Memorial Day when life will hopefully slow down some.


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Babs,
Well two years later I am still lusting after Catalpa aurea but of course Avant Gardens no longer sells it nor does any Google search nursery I can find. Grrrr....lesson learned It is OK to buy on implulse


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

KT -

Your friendly GW enabler comes through for you . . .

I often look for plants via the plantfiles on the website we aren't allowed to mention and they told me that Forest Farm has it. You could order for delivery in cooler weather.

Here is a link that might be useful: Forest Farm Catalpa 'Aurea


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Katy,
I had a Catalpa out front for years. It's gone now, but here is how I handled it and it wasn't too much work. Every year after flowering, I'd cut back half the branches (these would be the previous season's which had just flowered) and alternate every year so there was always a 50/50 mix of last year's and this year's growth. What I ended up with were half new growth each year which was left untouched to bloom the next season, and I would usually get flower clusters, which up close are like orchids. The other half which was finished blooming was cut back to the stump, and so on. Kept the tree at essentially eye level, so you could appreciate the flowers, and still not too tall for easy cutting. The wood is very soft, especially on wood only two seasons old, so pruning it was pretty quick. This method also gave me pretty large leaves all the time. So cutting alternate branches (evenly distributed in the crown of the tree of course!) gave me what I wanted for years. The new construction out front required removal of the tree however.


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Thanks for that idea, Bill. What a great way to have my cake and eat it, too . . . I think I'll need to find a spot for a catalpa.


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Babs aka GW enabler,
I would have responded to thank you faster but honestly I have become obsessed with the FF web site, now that I know I want to order one tree from the west coast I have convinced myself that I need to order multiple plants to justify the shipping. Presently I have eight yes that is right eight magnolia trees that I feel compelled to order along with four ilex, as well as a number of new to me zone 7 intros from New Zealand. I will shamefully post my final order within the next day or two and of course blame my lack of control squarely on your shoulders.
Bill,
What can I say other than brilliant, brilliant, brilliant, I love the idea of keeping one as a small garden tree so much I am now going to order two. One to add balance to an area that Has a Magnolia macrophylia and one to keep small in my front entry garden. Thanks


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Kt, you're incorrigible. I can't wait to see the list.

Forestfarm is a great source for trees. They grow and ship them really well. The only down side is that it's REALLY EASY to order more than you can fit into your yard, because they're small and inexpensive (comparatively). If you don't believe me, just ask the Quercus phellos, Franklinia alatamaha, Ginkgo biloba, Lagerstroemia indica, Hammamelis, Heptacodium miconioides, and varrious magnolias that I've somehow crammed into my tiny yard. I can't blame them for the Stewartia collection, but otherwise, they're totally guilty. (Well, maybe I'm just a tiny bit to blame.)


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Reasons for feeling guilt free about over planting.
1. It is all NHBabs fault.
2. I am good freinds with my tree guy and I haven't seen him in a while.
3. Half of them will likely die or be shovel pruned some time in the next few years.
4. A majority of the trees on my property are Pitch Pine which I was told had aged out twenty five years ago.
5. I now have two cats and worry that I might become known as the crazy cat lady rather than the crazy plant lady
6. I need to stimulate the economy to save my retirement (which is more sane than some of the economic theories out there).
7. It is all NHbabs fault

Well the items in my shopping cart started to grow and take on a life of their own so I decided to print the list and now turn to Dirr and any one here on GW to help me eliminate all but a few.
I was excited to discover and wonder if anyone has experience with;
Chitalpa tashkentensis Pink Dawn - Pink Chitalpa An unusual hybrid between two U.S. genera (Catalpa & Chilopsis) made in Russia, this small tree (to 25') is valued for drought tolerance as well as large clusters of ruffled pink 'trumpets' in summer. Sun/Med-Dry

Catalpa erubescens Purpurea - Purple-leaf Catalpa
caer014 Size1 $35.00 $35.00
$35.00
Catalpa bignonioides Aurea - Golden-lvd. Catalpa
cabi599 Size1 $35.00 $35.00
$35.00
Albizia julibrissin Summer Chocolate - Chocolate Silk Tree
alju008 Size1 $59.00 $59.00
$59.00
Callistemon viridiflorus - Bottlebrush
cavi054 Tube $9.95 $9.95
$9.95
Carpenteria californica Elizabeth - Elizabeth Tree Anemone
caca232 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Magnolia sieboldii - Oyama Magnolia
masi568 Size1 $35.00 $35.00
$35.00
Magnolia grandiflora Victoria - Dwf Southern Magnolia
magr062 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Magnolia Vulcan
mavu095 Size5 $79.00 $79.00
$79.00
Magnolia Caerhay's Belle
maca079 Size1 $45.00 $45.00
$45.00
Magnolia Galaxy
maga565 Size5 $79.00 $79.00
$79.00
Ilex cornuta x pernyi Doctor Kassab - Hybrid Holly
ildr535 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Ilex Red Beauty - Evergreen Holly
ilre047 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Hypericum calycinum Brigadoon - St. Johnswort
hyca100 Tube $8.95 $8.95
$26.85
Chilopsis linearis Bubba - Desert Willow
chli090 Size5 $49.00 $49.00
$49.00
Chionanthus retusus Arnold's Pride - Fringetree
chre057 Size5 $59.00 $59.00
$59.00
Chitalpa tashkentensis Pink Dawn - Pink Chitalpa
chta216 Size1 $19.00 $19.00
$19.00
Chitalpa tashkentensis Morning Cloud - White Chitalpa
chta016 Size1 $19.00 $19.00
$19.00
Choisya ternata - Mexican Orange Blossom
chte220 Size1 $15.00 $15.00
$15.00
Chrysolepis chrysophylla - Tree Chinquapin
chch263 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Cyrtomium macrophyllum - Large Lvd Holly Fern
cyma013 Tube $7.95 $7.95
$23.85
Decaisnea fargesii - Blue Bean Shrub
defa020 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Emmenopterys henryi
emhe047 Size1 $25.00 $25.00
$25.00
Eucryphia glutinosa
eugl175 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Euptelea pleiosperma
eupl273 Size1 $15.00 $15.00
$15.00
Evodia (tetradium) daniellii - Bee Bee Tree
evda030 Tube $9.95 $9.95
$9.95
Firmiana simplex - Chinese Parasol Tree
fisi030 Tube $9.95 $9.95
$9.95
Gardenia jasminoides Kleim's Hardy - Hardy Gardenia
gaja011 Tube $9.95 $9.95
$9.95
Ginkgo biloba Mayfield - Columnar Ginkgo
gibi040 Tube $19.95 $19.95
$19.95
Ginkgo biloba Witch's Broom - Dwarf Ginkgo
gibi050 Tube $19.95 $19.95
$19.95
Gordonia lasianthus - Loblolly Bay
gola030 Size1 $25.00 $25.00
$25.00
Halesia tetraptera Wedding Bells - Silver Bell
hawe077 Size5 $69.00 $69.00
$69.00
Hippophae rhamnoides Sprite - Dwarf Sea-buckthorn
hirh016 Size1 $19.00 $19.00
$19.00
Kalmiopsis leachiana - Kalmiopsis
kale060 Tube $12.95 $12.95
$12.95
Koelreuteria paniculata September - Goldenrain Tree
kopa040 Size1 $35.00 $35.00
$35.00
Laburnum anagyroides - Goldenchain Tree
laan025 Size1 $12.00 $12.00
$12.00
Laburnum watereri Sunspire - Goldenchain Tree
lawa097 Size1 $25.00 $25.00
$25.00
Liriodendron chinense - Chinese Tulip Tree
lich145 Size1 $15.00 $15.00
$15.00
Maackia amurensis - Amur Maackia
maam010 Tube $9.95 $9.95
$9.95
Olea europaea Arbosana - Hardy Olive
oleu072 Size1 $19.00 $19.00
$19.00
Petteria ramentacea
pera155 Size1 $15.00 $15.00
$15.00
Photinia Redstart - Hybrid Photinia
phre070 Size1 $12.00 $12.00
$12.00
Robinia Casque Rouge - Pink Cascade Bl.locust
rops597 Size1 $25.00 $25.00
$25.00
Tetracentron sinense
tesi023 Size1 $19.00 $19.00
$19.00


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Katy,
Are you actually going to try all of the things in your list? Good for you! As you probably know by now, I love to try the unusual things, the ones that aren't normally grown in New England. I'd be interested to know if you have success with the Olive, Bottlebrush and Gardenia. I have Gardenia "Frostproof" which has gone through two winters, and despite being moved twice, it's doing OK. Had one bloom this spring. I saw Photinia all over the place out in Oregon last May and it's quite a sight. That's also where I saw the Lithodora that I had to have. I planted one last year and this spring it was spectacular! That mound of deep blue flowers on the deep green foliage can't be beat for color! I don't know what "size 1" for the Albizzia julibrissin "Summer Chocolate" actually is, but I have seen this tree at Brigg's Nursery in Attleboro. They had good size ones, maybe 8-10 feet. Good luck with whatever you try. I know I'm glad that I gave my camellias a chance. I love broadleaf evergreens, and these do well and add color in fall ("Snow Flurry" - Oct-Dec) and a couple of the "April" series in spring.


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

KT -

I'll take the blame for the catalpas and for introducing you to FF (though I didn't realize you hadn't found them) . . . and perhaps help you trim a couple of inappropriate items from your list. (I probably shouldn't say this, but I always get lost in the dogwood section of FF's website. Last time I looked they had some lovely varieties.)

Some items you might want to reconsider, one that spreads invasively by seed and the other that spreads by suckering:
Koelreuteria paniculata September - Goldenrain Tree: About Goldenrain tree, Wikipedia notes, "In some areas, notably the eastern United States and particularly in Florida, it is considered an invasive species." So I'd check out how it does with the milder weather of the Cape and Islands to see if it is an issue around you.

And this is what the PCA Alien Plant Working Group has to say about black locusts in general (among other cautionary comments): "Black locust reproduces vigorously by root suckering and stump sprouting to form groves (or clones) of trees interconnected by a common fibrous root system. Physical damage to roots and stems increases suckering and sprouting, making control difficult. Black locust clones easily spread in quality and restorable natural areas." Do you really want this in your yard? (especially give that they go on to say that herbicides are really the only way to kill it off and it may sprout for several years after.) (http://www.nps.gov/plants/ALIEN/fact/rops1.htm)

I do have Halesia tetraptera 'Wedding Bells'. It's borderline hardy here, so suffers dieback, but it makes a nice large shrub for me and although the blooming is relatively short, it is impressive. I also really like the seed pods - just a fun and unusual shape. Foliage is a nice green and stays healthy. I would expect it would be more of a small tree for you.


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Bill,
LOL, No I am not going to buy everything on this wish list but I sure would like to. I saw Photinia all over the place out in Oregon last May and it's quite a sight I am not sure what the heck I am getting myself into with Photinia hybrid as Dirr has some unflattering things to say about P serrulata, P xfraseri, P. glabra, and P villosa, so who knows. The trouble I am discovering with lusting after plants that are rare in my neck of the woods is they are more often than not rare for a reason and Dirrs frank descriptions although disappointing are beginning to bring me back down to earth.
Gardenia "Frostproof" which has gone through two winters, and despite being moved twice, it's doing OK. Now that is a plant I can lust over!! It took me a while but I finally found the west side of my house offers more protection for camellias and I am planning on renovating the landscape in that area this fall. Do you have any recommendations?
Nhbabs,
Yes I had heard of and ordered from FF in the past but stopped a couple of years ago when the postage cost more than the plant. But what can I say some women just can resist the lure of Jimmy Choos any will impulsively drop a bundle on their footwear. Myself, I had an extreme craving for Catalpa bignonioides Aurea - Golden-lvd. Catalpa that nothing but Dirrs dislike for the tree was going to squelch. Hmmmm�Now I don�t know what to believe. What do you think Dirr means when he uses the adjective coarseness? Is that the scientific way of saying butt ugly?
Thanks for the heads up about the Laburnum watereri Sunspire - Goldenchain Tree being in the Fabaceae family along with black locust this definitely warrants further investigation. Wikipedias reference to Koelreuteria paniculata September - Goldenrain Tree possibly being invasive was another surprise.

Dirr; Manuel of Woody Landscape Plants
Forest Farm Catalogue description
Wikpedia

Catalpa erubescens Purpurea - Purple-leaf Catalpa LANDSCAPE VALUE: Limited value in the residential landscape because of coarseness; has place in difficult areas but the use of this and the following species should be tempered.
A show in spring when its huge (10-16") leaves open deep DEEP purple, this spreading 40-50' tree also offers 8-12"clusters of white "foxglove" flowers in early summer. Sun/Med caer014 Size1 $35.00

Catalpa bignonioides Aurea - Golden-lvd. Catalpa LANDSCAPE VALUE: Limited value in the residential landscape because of coarseness; has place in difficult areas but the use of this and the following species should be tempered.
Like the species, but with leaves "a rich & persistent yellow through-out the summer, making a beautiful spectacle" (Barber & Phillips). SunMed
cabi599 Size1 $35.00

Albizia julibrissin Summer Chocolate - Chocolate Silk Tree LANDSCAPE VALUE: Not a quality plant because of insect and disease problems; sets prodigious quantities of fruits and effectively seeds itself in waste and roadside situations; foliage and flowers provide a tropical effect; unless wilt-immune clone is found I would avoid using the species.
Striking burgundy-chocolate-brown foliage keeps its color summer into fall (even in SE heat & humidity) on this airy small (to 20'x 15') tree with its fuzzy soft pink flowers.; a standout in the landscape. PP13822. S-P/M/GDr
alju008 Size1 $59.00 $59.00

Callistemon viridiflorus - Bottlebrush Dirr has good things to say about Callistemon citrinus as well as other species but I am beginning to doubt it�s cold hardiness.
Perhaps the hardiest of the bottlebrushes, from moist, well-drained soils along Tasmanian watercourses, this 6' x 6' shrub produces its 2-3" yellow-green brush flowers in summer. Sun/Med
Then again for $9.95 it might be worth the try

cavi054 Tube $9.95

Carpenteria californica Elizabeth - Elizabeth Tree Anemone Not listed in the big green bible
Chosen for its compact (to 8' x 6') habit, profuse bloom of large white flowers & deep-green leaves, every spring this lovely California native draws a continuous supply of "oooh & aaahs"!. PSh/Med-Dry/GdDrain
caca232 Tube $12.95

Magnolia sieboldii - Oyama Magnolia Dirr has many good things to say about this tree/shrub as well as three other species "All are first rate garden plants where adaptable. Best used in a mixed shady border with hostas, ferns, and wildflowers planted underfoot.
"Fragrant, white, cup-shaped, nodding flowers with brilliant red stamens bloom intermittently through summer [on this rounded shrub/small tree followed by spectacular crimson fruit" (Phillips & Barber). Sun-PSh/Med
masi568 Size1 $35.00

Magnolia grandiflora Victoria - Dwf Southern Magnolia
To 20' with showy & wonderfully fragrant 8-12"creamy-whi flowers in e.sum, this impressive tree (from our SE states) has also proven to be amazingly hardy, perhaps most so in this variety selected in Vancouver B.C. Sun/M
magr062 Tube $12.95 $12.95

Magnolia Vulcan
Brilliant ruby-red cup & saucer flowers at an early age characterize this this fetching newcomer, a small tree coaxed into being (M.campbellii 'Lanarth' x M.liliflora) by Felix Jury of New Zealand. Sun/Med
mavu095 Size5 $79.00

Magnolia Caerhay's Belle
12" flowers of a rich salmon-pink decorate this fast-growing (to 30' in 10 years) tree at an early (5) age & all the way to the bottom branches; a fine sargentii x sprengeri hybrid from Charles Michael of Cornwall. SUN/Med
maca079 Size1 $45.00

Magnolia Galaxy
This upright, almost columnar tree (to 30' x 20'), developed by the US National Arboretum, is perfect for a tight spot where its quantities of 8- 10", 12-tepaled flowers of reddish-purple to light-rose will entrance. Sun-PSh/Med
maga565 Size5 $79.00 $

Ilex cornuta x pernyi Doctor Kassab - Hybrid Holly
Dark-green, lustrous, leathery leaves form a broad 15-20' pyramid which is accented in winter with bright red fruits (this being a female cultivar). Sun/Med
ildr535 Tube $12.95

Ilex Red Beauty - Evergreen Holly
Very densely branched AND very densely berried, this narrowly conical (to 10') hybrid (meserveae x pernyi) offers an abundance of bright red fruit showcased on dark, glossy foliage; from Orton of Rutgers. Sun/Med

ilre047 Tube $12.95
Hypericum calycinum Brigadoon - St. Johnswort Not listed in the big green bible
Gold, orange, apricot, even coral make the spring foliage GLOW! on this 16"tall x 24"wide shrub/groundcover but you won't miss it in summer either with chartreuse leaves topped by bright 2"yellow flowers; deer resistant & easy. SUN/Med-Dry
hyca100 Tube $8.95 $

Chilopsis linearis Bubba - Desert Willow Not listed in the big green bible
Bright profuse flowers of lavender & dark purple all summer into fall make this vigorous AND drought tolerant small (to 20') tree a showboat; from Paul Cox at the San Antonio Bot.Grdn. Sun/M-D/GDr
chli090 Size5 $49.00

Chionanthus retusus Arnold's Pride - Fringetree Very beautiful specimen shrub, excellent in groups, borders, near large buildings; outstanding in flower; will do well in cities as it is quite air pollution tolerant; I would like to make a case for this as the national shrub for even dogwood does not carry itself with such refinement, dignity, and class when in flower; possibly not considered sufficiently hardy but is prospering in Orono ME, Manchester NH and Chicago IL. In fact the Manchester specimen by the Art Museum will perpetually linger in my memory as one of the largest specimens.
Fast growing & self-fruiting, this small (to 25' x25') tree offers multiple seasons of interest: fragrant flowers in spring, showy fall fruit & attractive peeling bark in winter; an Arnold Arb selection. Sun-PSh/Med

chre057 Size5 $59.00

Chitalpa tashkentensis Pink Dawn - Pink Chitalpa Not listed in the big green bible

An unusual hybrid between two U.S. genera (Catalpa & Chilopsis) made in Russia, this small tree (to 25') is valued for drought tolerance as well as large clusters of ruffled pink 'trumpets' in summer. Sun/Med-Dry
chta216 Size1 $19.00 $19.00

Chitalpa tashkentensis Morning Cloud - White Chitalpa Not listed in the big green bible
The willowy branches are cascading on this vigorous (to 25' x 25') airy shrub/tree & produce a "cloud" of large clusters of white flowers with rich purple streaks in summer. Sun/Med-Dry
chta016 Size1 $19.00 $19.00

Choisya ternata - Mexican Orange Blossom Not listed in the big green bible
White flowers throughout late spring/early summer fill "the air with orange-blossom perfume" (Genders); the shiny green leaves of this med. rounded shrub are also aromatic if crushed; nice in sun or shade or as container plant. Sun-PSh/Med/GdDrain
chte220 Size1 $15.00 $15.00

Chrysolepis chrysophylla - Tree Chinquapin Not listed in the big green bible
"Spectacular in full bloom" (Kruckeberg) but a handsome tree at any time of year with its narrrow dark-green leaves, glossy above & golden beneath. Sun/GDr
chch263 Tube $12.95

Cyrtomium macrophyllum - Large Lvd Holly Fern Not listed in the big green bible
These one to two foot arching yellow-green fronds have two to eight large undivided pinnae (leaflets) per frond; a handsome, non-spreading fern for woodland or shaded container. PSh-Shade/Med
cyma013 Tube $7.95

Decaisnea fargesii - Blue Bean Shrub Not listed in the big green bible
defa020 Tube $12.95
This uncommon Chinese shrub to 10' has gained distinction from its very long (to 3') pinnate leaves & remarkable metallic-blue seed pods. Sun-PSh/Med

Emmenopterys henryi Not listed in the big green bible
"One of the most strikingly beautiful trees of the Chinese forests" (E.H Wilson), this rare small tree/lrg shrub (to 40' x 40') has large leaves (bronzy prpl in spr) & funnel-shaped clusters (to 7") of large white sumr flowers. S/M/G
emhe047 Size1 $25.00

Eucryphia glutinosa Not listed in the big green bible
"One of the most glorious of woody plants" (Hillier); 2"fragrant flowers borne profusely in late summer followed by beautiful autumn tints make this erect-branched large shrub/small tree a knockout. S/M

eugl175 Tube $12.95

Euptelea pleiosperma Not listed in the big green bible
Undeservedly rare in cultivation, this 15-30' tree/shrub stops-the-eye in spring when crowded with clusters of red-anther"fls" & coppery young growth & again in fall when its round, long-tipped leaves turn red. Sun/M
eupl273 Size1 $15.00
Evodia (tetradium) daniellii - Bee Bee Tree LANDSCAPE VALUE: A very interesting tree, but unfortunately little known and used; a lovely small tree which can be used in the small landscape; excellent summer foliage. Flower and fruit characters make this a tree worthy of additional use; Wyman noted that the wood is comparatively weak and splits easily and the tree is short lived (15-40 years).
"A handsome species in flower & fruit" (B.Hora), this tree (to 50') has long 9-15" cmpd leaves & produces flat-topped clusters of small white flowers, enjoyed by bees in l.sum., followed by reddish to black fruits. Sun/Med
evda030 Tube $9.95

Firmiana simplex - Chinese Parasol Tree I doubt seriously whether the plant has a place in commerce
fisi030 Tube $9.95
"A noble foliage tree" (Hillier) (to 60') with leaves up to 1'X1'! and wonderful "parasol" seed pods. Sun/Med

Gardenia jasminoides Kleim's Hardy - Hardy Gardenia
gaja011 Tube $9.95 $9.95
$9.95
Ginkgo biloba Mayfield - Columnar Ginkgo
The Very Narrowest Ginkgo available, this fastigiate form with its short branches is a male with bright golden fall color & no fruit. Sun/Med
gibi040 Tube $19.95

Ginkgo biloba Witch's Broom - Dwarf Ginkgo
If the ancient Ginkgo could tell us history perhaps this "crystal ball" form (a globe to only 3' high!) can tell us the future, as well!, in any case it's a delightful shrub for accent, foundation or border. SUN/Med
gibi050 Tube $19.95

Gordonia lasianthus - Loblolly Bay Not listed in the big green bible
This small-medium-sized tree is a beautiful EG relative to the Franklin Tree; lovely 2-3" fragrant white camellia-like flowers. Sun-PSh/Med
gola030 Size1 $25.00

Halesia tetraptera Wedding Bells - Silver Bell
Larger more numerous white bells that are more fully open PLUS its smaller (to only 20', rather than 20-40') rounded habit make this lovely tree/shrub perfect anywhere; Dr.Mark Brand selection. SUN-PSh/Med(notdry)/GdDrain

hawe077 Size5 $69.00

Hippophae rhamnoides Sprite - Dwarf Sea-buckthorn
Perfect for hedges or foundation plantings, this compact (to 5-6' x 4-5') fruitless male selection offers attractive silvery-green foliage & an easy-going disposition: tolerant of poor soils & conditions. Sun/Med-Dry
hirh016 Size1 $19.00

Kalmiopsis leachiana - Kalmiopsis Not listed in the big green bible
Quite rare, & endemic in SW Oregon, this lovely little shrub of compact tufted habit with sm.glossy leaves & delicate rose-pink "bell" flowers has had a Wilderness Area named after it.Best is PSh with Excellent drainage. S-PSh/M
kale060 Tube $12.95

Koelreuteria paniculata September - Goldenrain Tree
LANDSCAPE VALUE: Excellent and unrivaled for late yellow flowers; one of the very few yellow flowering trees; excellent as a small lawn tree; for shading a patio; suggested as a street tree although supposedly somewhat weak wooded; very lovely to look upon on a hot July day; choice specimen tree where space is limited; shows tremendous adaptability to extremes of soil.
This selection of a tree (15-25') pretty in leaf (feathery), fruit and flowers (6-12"upright clusters of gold) extends its flowering from July August to August-September to add a BRIGHT splash to late summer. SUN/Med/GdDrain
It is popularly grown as an ornamental tree in temperate regions all across the world because of the aesthetic appeal of its flowers, leaves and seed pods. Several cultivars have been selected for garden planting, including 'Fastigiata' with a narrow crown, and 'September Gold', flowering in late summer.
The seeds are edible when roasted, but not commonly consumed.
In some areas, notably the eastern United States and particularly in Florida, it is considered an invasive species.

kopa040 Size1 $35.00

Laburnum anagyroides - Goldenchain Tree
Common Laburum tend to be low branched, bushy, wide spreading, 20 to 30 foot high tree. The golden yellow flowers occur in cylindrical pendulous 6 to 10 inch long downy racemes. Pods 2 to 3 inches long. Central and Southern Europe. Cultivated in 1650.
In late spring 6-10"pendulous clusters of golden-yellow pea-flowers hang like golden chains from all along the branches of this small (15-20') tree. SUN/Med

laan025 Size1 $12.00

Laburnum watereri Sunspire - Goldenchain Tree
LANDSCAPE VALUE; Good in shrub border, near buildings, corners of houses; plant in a protected spot; very effective when grouped in threes and fives; makes a tremdous show in flower; truly a beautiful plant in flower and the German popular name, Goldregen (Golden Rain) is most appropriate; widely planted in Europe but not so common in the United States; at Bodnant Gardens, Wales, there is the famous "Laburnum Arch" with plants trained across a structure about 50 to 75 yards long; the flowers cascade and the visitors can walk through this feature; my visit coincided with full flower and the effect was just overwhelming.
Its narrowly upright form & short but profuse somewhat pendulous flower clusters make this hybrid (L.alpinum x L.anagyroides) a useful and striking accent; sometimes called L.'Columnaris'. Sun/Med/GdDrain
lawa097 Size1 $25.00

Liriodendron chinense - Chinese Tulip Tree
The large leaves of this rare med-sized tree are distinctively lobed, like those of its American cousin but, unlike those of L.tulipifera, they are attractively tinged with red in spring. Sun/Med

lich145 Size1 $15.00

Maackia amurensis - Amur Maackia LANDSCAPE VALUE: Of interest for the late summer flowers; the specimens I have seen have had very clean foliage and appeared quite vigorus; the more I see of this tree the more impressed I am by its durability and general adaptation; has survived at Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and performed spectacularly at Bernheim Arboretum and Swathmore College; the foliage has a certain richness and the bronze-colored bark is quite attractive; I believe it would be a good candidate for street tree and container planting.
"Very hardy, attractive, small, slow-growing deciduous tree "related to Yellowwood but with dense erect clusters of pea-like flowers -- white-tinged with blue, in summer, even on young trees. Sun/Med
maam010 Tube $9.95

Olea europaea Arbosana - Hardy Olive Not listed in the big green bible
Resistant to disease & cold temperature, this olive was produced for commercial olive oil production: it produces 19-20% oil with a fruit pleasant flavor on younger and smaller trees. Sun/M-D USPPP
oleu072 Size1 $19.00

Petteria ramentacea Not listed in the big green bible
Its fragrant yellow flowers in early summer & trifoliate leaves make this unusual shrub resemble a shrubby, erect-flowered Golden Chain. SUN/Med
pera155 Size1 $15.00

Photinia Redstart - Hybrid Photinia Photinia serrulata-LANDSCAPE VALUE: Large hedge or privacy screen; could be used as a small tree; often used erroneously on the corners of small buildings; have seen it used in groupings around large campus buildings and it tends to soften some of the harsh architectural lines; can be used in groupings, screens, FLOWERS ARE REALLY FOUL SMELLING
Born to be a hedge (or a nice small tree), this evergreen (to 15' tall x 10' wide, but easily pruned) offers dense foliage for privacy, bronzy-red spring tips, showy white summer flowers, & yellow-orange fruit in fall. Sun/Med
phre070 Size1 $12.00

Robinia Casque Rouge - Pink Cascade Bl.locust LANSCAPE VALUE: An "alley cat" type tree which can survive under the toughest conditions; good for stripped mine areas, highway cuts and fills, sandy poor soils, shelter plantations and afforestation purposes; NOT RECOMMENDED FOR THE HOME LANDSCAPE, but definitely has a place in difficult areas; the flowers are exceedingly fragrant from which bees produce a delicious honey; several cultivars offer attractive foliage and flowers.
The large, pendulous, purplish-pink flowers of this vigorous small tree are profusely borne in early summer; a hybrid between R. pseudoacacia & R. hispida, it is sometimes known as R. X margaretta
. Sun/Med

rops597 Size1 $25.00
Tetracentron sinense Not listed in the big green bible
This rare tree makes an elegant specimen or a graceful woodland beauty with its wide-spreading 30-50' tall habit, large pointed, heart-shaped leaves & pendulous flower catkins in spring. Sun-PSh/Med
tesi023 Size1 $19.00


 o
kt may need help

I think an intervention is called for.....


 o
RE: Stooling Catalpa

LOL, yes, idabean, an intervention sounds like just the thing.

Meanwhile, when Dirr says "Limited value in the residential landscape because of coarseness" IMHO he just means that catalpas have to be sited carefully, because they have so much ... presence. He's not talking about Kt's garden, and he doesn't know that she'll find just the right spot for one or three of these.


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

or five or six or twenty.....


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

I agree with DtD that Dirr's coarseness refers to the large leaves, the texture of the branches and twigs - literal coarseness rather than ugly. I personally like its appearance quite a lot and in the right spot it's majestic to my eye. However, as a specimen tree in the center of a suburban lawn with little else planted in the yard, it is rather homely, unlike a solitary oak or sugar maple or birch.

and as a side note, Dirr has clear biases . . . Don't get me wrong, he is one of my favorite authors. I love his opinions and his writing style is wonderful and often humorous, but I don't always agree with his opinions. I think that he often is thinking about what will work with a typical residential property and he is in Georgia and was in the midwest, so that what he says looks diseased in summer may well have healthy foliage for me. As an example, your quote from him above is actually what he says about the native fringetree, Chionanthus viginianus, which I do have, largely based on his recommendation. (C. retusus is a bit less hardy and wouldn't do well for me in all likelihood.) It's a tree (or large shrub for me right now) which is much like magnolias in that it has rather coarse or large-textured leaves and twigs and not much in the way of fall color, but is really gorgeous when in bloom. So like magnolias I'd view it as a one season woody, never ugly, but of outstanding interest only during the spring. I'm not sure if I would plant it on a tiny property, but since I've got lots of room to plant, it's lovely against the dark foliage of the hemlocks and white pines and will be getting a second season of bloom from the clematis that I am in the process of training into its branches. Many of the dogwoods (Cornus) or Fothergilla are much more a multiseason shrub IMO.

(I know, that didn't help trim down your list. Perhaps you need to post the woodies list on the shrubs and/or trees forum for input?)


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RE: Stooling Catalpa

Well you have to admit that when you are fiddling with the landscape you can easily find yourself on the tip top of a long slippery slope. Hence my solution to every design problem has always been to add more and more and more until all hint of the original design is buried under the surrounding foliage of twenty or so plants and presto chango problem solved. The problem for me began with the addition of Magnolia macrophylla that is most often mistaken by a garden visitor for a banana tree. I love this magnolia but it does need another large leaved tree with view shot and then that very large leaved tree needs another large leaved tree within its view shot and so on and so on. So goes the slippery slope.
Babs, Well said I feel exactly the same about Dirr I have often thought that it would be wonderful if one of his companions would do another manual but I guess there is not enough money to be had for all of that research time.


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