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Asarum Europaeum/Ginger

Posted by tulipscarolan z6 RIcoast (My Page) on
Wed, May 5, 10 at 16:12

Hi there!
There are two purposes to this post. First, I want to let everyone know how easy it is to propagate European Ginger, and second, I have a question.

When I first bought ginger from White Flower Farm, I received a tiny two-leafed plantling, all for $12.95 plus shipping. When I see it in nurseries, it is always on the expensive side (although less than WFF). I truly don't understand why it is expensive, as it is very easy to propagate through division. My first tiny plant grew very healthy, and each year I have divided it over & over again. I now have batches everywhere --if I could sell it for $12.95 per tiny division, we could retire and live off the proceeds! It doesn't travel, just forming beautiful clumps, but in the spring, dig it up and separate little sections and replant. See below--3 years of photos in a row. Anyway, I encourage anyone who has this and wants more to just divide it.

My question is this: I have seen some seedlings sprout up around my plants. When they survive, they seem to grow teensy little miniature leaves. See the bottom picture. Will these be normal sized leaves next year, or remain miniature? It's just funny because when you divide, the leaves are all full sized, so I've never seen these itty bitty leaves. Cute.

I also included a picture from my parterre garden. I edged the 4 quadrants in divisions of ginger. I haven't yet planted out my annuals that go behind the ginger, but just wanted to show how many plants I've gotten, all from 2 tiny original leaves. I have about 50 more clumps elsewhere. It's my favorite plant!
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Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Asarum Europaeum/Ginger

Great pics -- thanks for posting them.

I have the same plant and also bought a tiny little thing for way too much money. This is the first year I have divided it, (after having it for about 3 years) and the divisions are looking lovely. I dug the whole thing and just sliced and diced just like Hosta or Sib Iris, just as it was emerging in the spring.

I have it by the back door and everyone comments on it and asks what it is. I will definitely be doing much more dividing next early spring.

Great plant -- highly recommended for anyone who has the opportunity to grow it.


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RE: Asarum Europaeum/Ginger

Do you think it is too late to divide now? I have one that was a nice size chunk, but didn't realize how well they can divide.

Lisa


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RE: Asarum Europaeum/Ginger

Hi Lisa,
It is not too late to divide. However, it may look somewhat "sloppy" this year, but it will be great for next year! It is preferable to do it earlier so that it grows into its new shape. But, if you choose to divide it into itty bitty divisions, it will look somewhat funny this year no matter what. So go for it!


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