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Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Posted by pixie_lou 5 (My Page) on
Fri, Jun 1, 12 at 9:35

This is a place to post photos, and to discuss, what is in your garden. This is the thread for June 2012. Since Spring has arrived, we will be focusing on blossoms. If the thread starts getting too picture heavy, I will create a June Part II thread later in the month.

In 2011 we needed 2 threads for Junes. Here are the links:
June 2011 Part 1
June 2011 Part 2

For Previous Threads from 2012:
May 2012

April 2012

March 2012

February 2012

January 2012

To see all of the 2011 threads, please click on the December 2011 link. The first post will have links to all previous months.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

To start the month of June Ismene and Perennial Salvia
Ismene and Salvia

Coreopsis
Coreopsis

Winter sown Royal Carpet Alyssum
Alyssum Royal Carpet

Winter sown Fordhook Nasturtium
Nasturtium Fordhook

Is this Sweet William? Or a weed?
Photobucket

And lastly - a few pictures of all the Siberian Iris in bloom around the pond.
Pond 1

Pond 2

Pond 3

Pond 4

Photobucket


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

The irises are simply beautiful in a very lovely setting. Now, I'm going to have to get white salvia. Didn't know it existed! Excellent work, pixie. This thread is a gift.

Kindly,
Jane (who STILL has pond envy)


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Pixie Lou, what a beautiful setting for Siberian Iris, and many other Iris varities! I'm having a bit of pond envy.

Sadly, I had to tear out and give away all my Japanese Iris plants two years ago because the clumps had grown so enormous that they hid our river view and overwhelmened my daylillies and shasta daisey plants. The friend who took them had more land than I do and plenty of places that needed filling in.

Do you have another view of the wall or (or inlet?) in the final photo? I'd love to see it up close. Rocks and landscaping with them are two of my favorite things.

Molie


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jun 4, 12 at 14:41

That's a fine use of the Siberian irises, pixie_lou - and it looks like you have plenty of room for the second row when these irises fill in...

Back in the March 2012 thread I posted this pic with a note:

Not a crocus in sight, but I think there's going to be a nice digitalis (foxglove) path later on. These are all self-seeded.

Well, now the digitalis have started to bloom here and the path is lined with them. Some of them are taller than I am.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

I'm going to have to dig out a nice bleeding heart that got buried under the foxgloves - I don't think it has a chance for next year.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Jane - the white salvia doesn't seem to get as big and as prominent as the blue salvia. And the blossoms don't seem to last as long. But then I don't have a blue one to compare it to - just neighborhood plants. I'm still happy with the plant. It will last longer than the ismene, at 1/4 the price!

Molie - I'll take a picture of the gate. It's actually an outlet. And there is a similar gate out on the river. We block the pond side to control the water level. The pond was built by the previous owners. I know I mention my pond a lot. It came with the house. The previous owner dug it back in the 1960s since his sons liked to play hockey. It's ~100 x 50 and about 7' deep. When we bought the house, it was swampifying, but we have worked to restore it. At this point we are working on the back side - trying to restore river access.

Claire - what an amazing patch of digitalis! They look gorgeous!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Lord. Well, I don't have a pretty foxglove path or an iris-ringed pond, but I do have a 6 foot wide artemisia powis castle filling in my own personal hell strip.

This area at the base of the drive used to cover me with sand (like Pig Pen in Charlie Brown) every time I mowed. About 9 ft.in from the road is town property so the snow gets dumped there and I add to it when I snow blow the driveway. Two years ago I decided to fill it with any Mediterranean -loving plant I could get for free or grow from seed because the plant $ goes out back where I can see it. That is a weaver's 6 foot long yard stick in front of the artemisia which is a single plant that was an end of the season give away at a local farm stand. My point is, if a plant is happy, it's happy. My mini hell strip is not a beauty, but rose campion, echinacea, artemisia, penstemon, monarda, lilies, all seem to thrive where once I could not grow grass! Yay for flowers!
Jane


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Not a lot blooming right now. I'll have to speak to the garden designer about that. :~) Good thing the Hostas are always looking good.

Back deck container
Photobucket

Hosta Blue Mouse Ears. I think these work well in containers.
Blue Mouse Ears

Athyrium 'Brilliance' with H. Lakeside Frosted Mint
Athyrium Brilliance w H. Lakeside Frosted Mint

A strange plant with a stranger name, Nectoscordum Siculum Bulgaricum.
Nectoscordum Siculum Bulgaricum

H. Spilt Milk getting ready to bloom.
Spilt Milk

The first Daylily of the season. This is Hemerocallis Stella Supreme. Sort of a toned down version of Stella D'Oro.
Stella Supreme

Hosta Guardian Angel with a flower bud.
Guardian Angel

A blue Veronica with Picea Pungens Maigold
Veronica w Picea Pungens Maigold

Allium Moly with H. Royal Flush
Royal Flush w/ Alium Moly

Front steps container.
Front Steps

Papyrus from the front container. We saw fields full of these plants in Africa.
Papyrus

Spirea Little Princess
Spirea Little Princess

Oxalis Iron Cross
Oxalis Iron Cross

H. Rich Uncle blooming in the rocks.
Rich Uncle

H. Sum and Substance. I guess it liked being moved.
Sum and Substance

Thanks for looking.

Steve


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Yay! I'm so glad people starting posting their pics this month - I was starting to get a little worried! Nice photos everyone and thank you for sharing!

Steve, your container is very attractive! I love the color combination. (I've had a hard time keeping my annuals looking decent so far this season with all the rain, and I guess the nurseries and garden centers are too - when I went back last week planning to get some replacements, their stuff didn't look much better than mine!)

Anyway, doesn't the papyrus need lots of water? Or am I mistaken? Do you have to do anything special to keep it going in the pot with the other stuff? And do you grow your stuff from seed or buy it? Really nice - and some gorgeous hostas too!

Dee


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Dee,

Thanks for your comments. I believe Papyrus does need a lot of water. When we saw it growing in the wild it was in low wet areas. The only thing I do is to use some water absorbing soil crystals in these containers, and I give them water every day that it doesn't rain. I took a workshop from Mass Hort on making containers and just went with the ideas from that. Basically, I only pay attention to light needs, limit the colors and then mix different kinds of plants. Annuals perennials and houseplants are mixed together in that pot. Here's another one I made for the back deck. It has a Hosta in it.

Deck Container

Steve


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

So Steve, (and it may be too early to tell, unless you did this last season too) does having the water crystals and watering that much adversely affect the other plants? I thought maybe you kept the papyrus in a pot inside the container, or something along those lines. This is interesting and encouraging to me!

I always envision these gorgeous containers and never seem to get around to doing them, or plant them and then ignore them! So I have to take pleasure in other people's wonderful container plantings. Thanks!

Dee


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 6, 12 at 11:54

Jane: Your Powis Castle looks great - I once had a slew of them and lost them one nasty winter (no snow cover and vicious winds and I may have pruned them badly).

Steve: Your hostas are blooming already! Nothing like that here yet.

I do have peonies though.

P. Festiva Maxima and Bowl of Beauty
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

P. Bowl of Beauty with lots of buds still to open. No ants on any peony buds this year for the first time. I have no idea why.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The roses are starting; R. rugosa 'Yankee Lady' is always first and ahead of the rest. She's gotten BIG.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

and at the rose's feet is the little calamint.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Claire


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RE RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 6, 12 at 12:19

Peonies are hard to upstage but these turkeys (hen plus chicks) just grabbed my attention. The grass benefited from the turkey droppings over the winter.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Claire, How do you keep your peonies from flopping in the rain? I gave up on the double flowered kinds because of that.

Dee,
I don't know the answer to that yet. I asked the instructor about the different cultural needs of plants in a container and she said she basically ignores them except for light needs. So I went to a local nursery and grabbed a cart full of plants that struck my fancy and could take full sun. Besides the Papyrus, there is an ornamental grass, Marguerite daisy, Heliopsis, Persian Shield, Sweet Potato vine, Petunia (supertunia I think), and a Heuchera in that pot. If something doesn't work, I'll pull it and replace it. In the fall I'll take it apart, compost the annuals, plant the perennials in the ground and pot up the houseplants.

You should try one. The only rule was "No Geraniums." :~)

Steve


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Claire, those are beautiful peonies and lucky turkeys. The peony,'Bowl of Beauty' was certainly named well. Gorgeous.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 6, 12 at 17:44

Steve: The Festiva Maxima peonies always flop in the rain but I just prop them up again. You can't see it in the photos but there are Y-stakes holding several stems. I also have a few cuttings in water in the house that didn't survive the rain (the stem broke).

I also use the standard peony grow-through supports. I don't really like to stake plants but the peonies are just so beautiful that I put up with it.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Once again some incredible photos from the group. But, I have to say Claire's turkeys might take the prize! Oh, how cute they are!

The Sinocalycalycanthus 'Hartlage Wine' continues to bloom.

The mountain laurel did not disappoint this year. Unfortunately, there was a sister shrub not far from this one and it for some reason died off this year.

Peonies are still going and trying to keep their heads up with all this rain.

This weigela alwasy puts on a great show. The color is a little off in this photo. It's a dark pink flower.

Painted daisies from seed last year joined the party and are blooming this year.

I started this Anchusa from seed last yaer and luckily some of it is flopping from the rain onto the dianthus. The spirea flower color is the same pink and I'm hoping the blue spikes can hold on until the spirea blooms. Should be a nice combo if I'm lucky enough with the timing.

Love, love, love this american wisteria. Smaller flowers than the Chinese or Japanese (and quite stinky!) but it is a blooming machine and this vine is not that old.

My MIL and I had waited for 10 years for this vine to bloom. Each year we would hope for flowers. Unfortunately she passed away in April. Look what the vine decided to do this year. I think it's a sign. Last year there were only about 4 flowers on it, so I would not have expected it to be flowering so prolifically this year. I'm sure she's looking down admiring the vine we always waited for.

Sometimes mother nature has quite a design sense. After that Halloween snow storm (we got 19" up here) they physocarpus 'Diablo' turned into a weeping shrub. I do tend to like it better this way. Nice Job Mother Nature!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

As always, everyone's photos are really lovely to see! I really enjoy seeing the diversity of our collective gardening styles and interests, and there are plants in my garden due to the recommendations I have read here in GW's NEForum.
Steve - For double peonies, I use a double ring support that lets them droop a bit when we have lots of rain like this year, but keeps the blossoms off the ground and is pretty unobtrusive. My Festiva Maximas are divisions out of my granddaddy's garden planted in the 50's and so have sentimental value, but the ones I have bought are all singles, Japanese, or tree peonies so I don't have to prop them up.
From June 5, 2012

I didn't get many other photos at the house the other day, since it started raining soon after I got home, but I did manage to get a picture of the clematis HFYoung which has been a mass of blossoms for a couple of weeks now.
From June 5, 2012

The big bed at DH's shop just down the road has its heaviest bloom at this time of year.
From June 5, 2012

From June 5, 2012

I was gone for much of the rhodie's bloom, but there is one still blooming, a delicate pink.
From June 5, 2012

I find it quite difficult to get my "blue" clematis to photograph well. Here Miguel Viso (paler flower on lower left) should be pinker and Daniel Deronda should be a deep blue-purple.
From June 5, 2012

The President should also be darker and less red, and is quite similar in color to Daniel D, though larger and less nicely shaped. The two crab spiders (white) were hanging out waiting for prey until I disturbed them climbing around in the bed. Can you find them near the center of the photo?
From June 5, 2012

C. Stolwijk Gold (flower color is more intense in reality) is just finishing up, leaving the seedheads and gold foliage to provide continuing interest.
From June 5, 2012

Ville de Lyon is in reality a bit darker. The flower shape, beautiful cerise color, long bloom, and robust vines make this one of my favorite clems.
From June 5, 2012

Bumblebees were enjoying the Nepeta/catmint.
From June 5, 2012

The steep, dry end of the garden is beginning to come into its own.
Nepeta and Penstemon
From June 5, 2012

A different Penstemon

From June 5, 2012

Poppy and Nepeta

From June 5, 2012

A few other random photos:
Hosta with Heuchera. I just wish the voles would let the Heuchera get to a decent size.

From June 5, 2012

Alliums bending low with the rain.

From June 5, 2012

Amsonia hubrichtii backed by Baptisia

From June 5, 2012

My favorite foliage combo: blue spruce, Coppertina ninebark which due to the rain is burying Hosta Sum & Substance, more Amsonia, and Baptisia.

From June 5, 2012

Sorry I was too lazy to look up specific variety names, but if anyone is interested I'll do that.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 13, 12 at 15:27

Beautiful photos all, and the gardens all seem to be well kept up. Things are a little wilder here.

My last peony to bloom is P. 'Red Magic', which blooms when 'Festiva Maxima' is a sodden mass. This photo is from a few days ago when there was sun.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Looking out the breezeway door, Itea virginica 'Henry's Garnet' (Virginia Sweetspire) is just beginning to bloom. It will be much showier in a little while, but I couldn't resist photographing it now.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Beyond the Itea is a jungle of roses and digitalis - the digitalis seeds itself wherever it pleases. I do need to introduce a different color into the mix.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Down by the road the hostas and ferns are loving this rainy weather.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Hosta 'Big Daddy'
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Jane - I love your patch of artemesia. I have a small patch - it is growing by the day, but it is still quite small.

steve - I am with the others in having container envy. I can't seem to get beyond marigolds, petunias and alyssum. Though I did throw some celosia plumose into the mix this year.

thyme - what is that vine? is it growing up a telephone pole or a tree trunk?

Who asked for a picture of my pond gate? I added the trellis behind it. There is a teeny tine new clematis barnaby starting to grow on the front of the trellis. And I planted some pink holly hocks on the back side of the trellis. In the background is part of my daughters whimsy garden and to the right is a huge brush pile. The brush pile location was chosen when a tree fell! The river is out behind the whimsy garden.
Photobucket

The evening primrose is starting to bloom. I love the bright yellow.
Evening Primrose

A nice row of campanula in the border gardens.
Campanula

Motherwort in the border gardens.
Motherwort

A row of containers on the edge of the patio. This photo was taken on Monday - and I'm amazed at how much the plants have grown since then. They sure enjoyed the rain yesterday!
Patio Color

I'm so happy that I chose Fordhook Nasturtiums in my hanging baskets on my clothesline. I can see the baskets as I stand at my kitchen sink.
Fordhook Nasturtiums 2

Fordhook Nasturtiums 1


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

I've been away for a few days and so had a lot of catching up to do. This is such a great thread. I saw so many beautiful things I'd love in my garden --- if I had more room. I'm definitely going to post some pictures.

Pixie Lou, thank you for the photo of your pond gate --- I asked for it and love it! The trellis behind it will be a beautiful feature as the clematis matures.

Jane, your hell strip is great. I wish more folks would think about planting in small under-used places like between the sidewalk and street (in our city). I think it's such a friendly idea--- planting beautiful things along the road is a boost for anyone who passes by.

Steve, all of your Hostas are wonderful but I've especially 'coveted' Mouse Ears since I saw a white-edged Mouse Ears at Hollister House last spring. Maybe in the fall if I get hunting online. It's not a plant I've seen at any nearby garden centers. We just planted a Picea abies 'Pusch' this season. I was not familiar with that confer but then I saw them on the Katsura Gardens' website (too far from us). When we found one at Broken Arrow Nursery in Hamden, CT, we grabbed it.

Nhbabs, I'm curious about your Rhododendron with those star-shaped/deep rimmed blossoms. Do you know the variety? Your blue Veronica (I think) in front of the magenta peonies is a striking combo.

Claire -- I left behind a Bowl of Beauty peony at my old house! Sad. Seeing your photo reminded me of how much I loved that plant. I also left behind an Angel Face Rose and some fantastic Azalaes but the new owner loves gardening so I'm sure they're doing fine.

Time2dig, we recently planted a Blue Moon Wisteria. Of course, it will probably take years for it to look as luscious as yours does. And, boy, do I love those stone steps in your last photo! That's the kind of stuff I used to do in my younger days.

Molie


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Molie,

The NE Hosta Society publishes a list of Hosta Resources. These are places to buy Hosta in New England where you can be sure to get virus and nematode free plants. The go to place in Connecticut is John O'Brien's nursery in Granby. I'm sure he will have what you need. It's worth a trip even if you have to travel. BTW, the white edged version of Blue Mouse Ears is called Frosted Mouse Ears.

Steve

Here is a link that might be useful: New England HS list of resources


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Thanks, Steve, for the information on the John O'Brien nursery; Granby is just a ride up 91 from here and definitely worth it to get my hands on a Frosted Mouse Ears!

I have been sitting here trying to include some of my garden photos from last week. It's been a while since I posted photos, and I'm kind of 'rusty.' I was checking out the river part of the garden -- looking at my Queen Elizabeth's blooms and a new prostrate Larch we planted. Saw a strange hole in the dirt. Investigated a bit more and realized that a Snapping Turtle was laying her eggs in a recently weeded part of the garden!

Of course, I didn't want to stay too long and annoy her, but I did get some photos.

See her tucked underneath the sedum?


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

My two main perennial beds are a mess but as of yesterday are less weedy. I lost both a clump of shasta daisies and a dark leaved wigeila in the circle garden. Right now, that garden is overcrowed except for a gap and nothing has been blooming except for a single surviving blue lupine.

Thank you for posting pictures. I need some garden envy this morning to get back out there and spruce things up. I'll make notes about what is blooming now that could be added to the circle bed after I subtract some things. I should be happy that some clumps have gotten large enough to divide.

Love the snapping turtle pics!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 17, 12 at 9:32

Very nice snapping turtle, molie! (The garden's very nice too!) I wonder how the turtle knew there was nice open soil there - did she smell it, or maybe she'd just been exploring around and struck paydirt....

I need a snapping turtle to chase off the woodchuck that defoliated 11 or 12 Phlox paniculatas (I think there was a twelfth but I can't find it). I have two pinwheels but they didn't work.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Molie -

I am fairly certain that the rhodie I posted is Independence, which is supposed to bloom around the beginning of July, much later that any other evergreen rhodie. This year it seems to be early, but it did bloom much later than any of my other evergreen rhododendrons. (and I can't take credit for the magenta peony/veronica combo - that's T2D's.)


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Thanks, nhbabs ---I checked out your Independence Rhododendron online. Unfortunately it will grow too large for our small yard. Still, I love the fact that it blooms so late.

T2D, sorry that I mixed up names & photos and did not give you credit for that knockout combo of magenta peony and veronica. They remind me so of Monet's gardens.

Regarding the turtle visitors ---- I'm actually not fond of those snappers. We live along a tidal river where snapping turtles have been laying their eggs in our gardens for several seasons now and they always seem to dig next to my favorite plants. I think they look upon my gardens as a Motel 6. We get all the usual garden visitors... muskrats, deer, occasional coyote or fox and woodchucks. Woodchucks are real pests. Two years ago they were eating the pumpkins from the patch my grandson and I planted so he could have some for Halloween. I'll never plant pumpkins again --- it was a continuous fiesta in our yard.

But I think the funniest thing I ever saw was a huge clump of my Shasta daisy "running" down the hill along the back fence. When I looked closer, it was a muskrat carrying off part of my plant in a dash for the river. My husband laughed and said he was just picking flowers for his little woman. But then he got really ticked off when a critter demolished his two beautiful Heliopsis helianthoides 'Prairie Sunsets'. So I can feel your pain, Claire, about the lost Phlox. The only thing that will stop these visitors is a wire cage --- also a gun, but I won't go that route. After all, this was their home before it was ours.

Molie


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Claire, I just love your foxgloves. They look positively magical. I often think of planting some, but their poisonous nature always scares me out of it. They are just lovely to look at though.

Jane, I like your "hell strip." I agree, happy plants, even if rather humble looking, are better than no plants. I don't think it looks bad though. It has a sort of desert garden look about it.

Steve, your oxalis iron cross is an intriguing looking plant. I hope that my veronica that I planted last fall will be the equal of yours at some point.

Pixielou, I adore your garden clock! Does it keep time or is it decorative only? It is wonderful! Your nasturtiums look great. Mine are always late bloomers here, but once they get started they bloom up until the frost. They're just leafy foliage now.

And Claire, I love your bowl of beauty peonies. I want to add some peonies in the future but have to decide where to put them. I know now what variety I want!

Molie, your gardens are just beautiful and I love your photo sequence of the snapping turtle. How funny about the daisy theft by Mr Muskrat! I guess for every destruction of our plants by critters, they also provide us with compensating entertainment.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 19, 12 at 17:01

I'm not a container gardener, but I have a few pots I sometimes stick sedums or hens and chicks into and then I ignore them for a year or two, maybe pulling the oak leaves out and weeding them, but usually not. I just looked at this one for probably the first time this year and discovered some of the sedums are flowering. That's a self-seeded Siberian iris in there and maybe some yarrows. I kind of like it though and I hope it will fill out.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

I've also been waiting for some self-sown winterberry seedlings to flower. My big old winterberry almost always has berries but I have no idea what pollinates them. Probably something in the woods, maybe by the pond down the hill where there are lots of winterberries. A few years ago there was a lousy cold spring and several people on the forum reported no holly berries. My winterberry was bare, so I've been hoping that I'd find a male seedling I could nurture for dependable pollination.

I have four seedlings - the biggest is a female and had berries last year. The other three were smaller and no flowers or berries last year. This year all four have flowers and I think three of them are males (I was hoping the difference would be obvious like in other hollies).

My winterberry seedling that had berries last year - female flower:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

One of my other winterberry seedlings - male flower:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Claire (I feel a bit like I"m lecturing but I hope some people are interested in being able to tell the difference.)


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Spedigrees - I just got the clock. I had been wanting an outdoor clock, I saw this one at BJ's and decided I needed it. It is 2 faced, and the face is big enough that I can see it from halfway across the yard. But the real test will be to see if it continues to keep time during the winter. That was the problem we had with the cheapo outdoor clock I bought at Walmart.

Claire - I appreciate the tutorial. I love discovering these subtle differences in nature. I've always wondered how I could tell the difference between my male and female hollies - besides looking at the tags!

Molie - I hear you on the snapping turtles. One the one hand I enjoy having them. On the other hand, they can do quite a bit of damage to the gardens.

This is the time of year when I have height in bloom in my front gardens. Heliotrope is in bloom. And the lillies are about to burst.
Height 1

Height 2

I do yellow flowers around my mailbox. Corepsis, Stella D'Oro Day Lillies, and Evening Primrose are all in bloom.
Photobucket

I bought these Cosmos Picotee. I love the 2 tone blooms.
Cosmos Picotee

I still love my nasturtiums. They are too pretty to pick.
Nasturtiums

The latest garden box for my daughter. It is the start of our "animal" garden. So far we have "lark"spur and "dragon" head. I've since added "spider"wort. And will transplant some "Bee"balm and "Tiger" Lillies soon. The dragon was a gift from my mom - not quite in the same category as Claires lawn dragon.
Animal Garden

And a couple overall shots of the pond.
Pond 1
This shot is looking South. In the background from left to right is the wood shed, then my daughters whimsy garden - the cinder blocks that are morpihng into moss steps, her balance beam, the terra cotta family, the teepee, the toad stools, and her old bench climber where she goes to read. Out behind the bench climber is the outlet pipe to the river. The west side of the pond - out behind the row of pines is the river. Keep in mind that when we bought this house, it was so overgrown out back that we couldn't even walk behind the pond. We still can't walk behind the pines down to the river - that's the next project to tackle. I still have to add the siberian irises to the back side of the pond. We're adding a row of raised beds for flowers back there. Behind the raised beds I have a walkway. And I just seeded grass - between the raised beds and the pond flower border.
This is a view the other direction - North.
Pond 2
Just grass, the compost bins, and you can see the veggie garden.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 20, 12 at 6:57

pixie_lou: It's great to see your lilies with nice healthy foliage - a reminder to people that you can keep lilies in spite of the nasty beetles.

Your daughter sounds like a really nice person with an interesting life (whimsy garden, animal garden, balance beam, outdoor reading bench...). You're raising her well.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Thanks for the complements Claire. I feel like I'm always walking that fine line between spoiling my daughter and indulging her.

The heat this week made the lillies explode. Eye Liner Lilly - named for the black line around the petals.Eyeliner Lillies

Eye Liner Close Up

The day lillies are starting to open. Are these considered "ditch" lillies? I wonder since they are the darker orange petals. But they are way out in back and it's nice to see the big splotches or orange from afar.
Day Lillies
I bought these hair alliums - which were a new variety this year. This is my only one with hair. The rest of mine are bald. Overall I'm not impressed with the variety. They don't look anything like the catalog photo.
Hair Alliuim

Here is a link that might be useful: Hair allium in the Brecks catalog


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Pixie, your pond is beautiful. It's nice to see full views of it. You guys have done a lot of work clearing, and it will be nice when you clear a path to the river. How nice to live close to a river.

Just curious, but why do you have a bigger-than-life black tick painted on your drainpipe!?

It's too bad that the hairy alliums did not pan out for you. The catalogue picture at the link you posted look really cool. My own ordinary purple alliums have fizzled after about two years. I had only three blooms this year, out of my dozen plants. They have gone the way of the lupine, which also for some reason do not thrive in my gardens. I think I will replace them with some of my bee balm plants which are spreading like mad. (My bee balm arrived as a single stalk several years ago, a stowaway in with a bunch of phlox that I bought.) It's survival of the fittest in my flower beds!

You should pick your beautiful nasturtiums and enjoy them inside as well as outside! The more you pick, the more blooms you get. I love the way the orange and yellow colors blend on some of the flowers as if by a watercolor paintbrush. Mine do that too as the season progresses, from cross polination I assume.

Your eyeliner lilies intrigue me. Normally I'm not a fan of white flowers, but their black "eyeliner" around the petals is really striking. Do the red beetles not bother them? (They have decimated my tiger lilies.)

Ditch lilies indeed! I take offense at the term and refuse to call them that! They are daylilies, and the primary type of daylily in people's gardens back when I was a kid, and they were NOT called "ditch lilies" back then. I love them. I have other varieties of daylilies too, but the old originals remain one of my favorite flowers!

Does your garden clock run by battery power or house current? That would definitely be a useful thing, as I tend to lose track of time when I'm outdoors.

I like your little garden dragon too. He may not be huge, but he's cute! And it IS the Chinese calendar year of the dragon after all!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Ah boy...now I really have pond envy. Very nice, pixie, and to be surrounded by irises, my, oh my, a bit of heaven.

Never heard the term 'ditch' lily until I read it on the NE Forum. We've always called them day or tiger lilies. To me, 'Ditch' seems to be an inaccurate appellation for such a nice, dependable lily. This is just one group on my property. The others bloom happily under wild dogwood and ring a small grove of white oak on town property. I just keep planting them wherever I want free color in a shady or sunny spot. How many plants can do that?

Fully agree with Sped and Claire about the animal garden and gardening with your daughter. Teaching is not spoiling; teaching is love.

Personally, I eat nasturtium blossoms and Sped is right, you'll get more flowers. Link below for eating them. (It's not like I'm suggesting you make turtle soup, lol)

Kindly,
Jane :)
P.S. Glad to know the difference between boy and girl ilex blossoms. Took almost 7 decades to learn it, but now I know, hehehe. I have winterberry and now that the deer have stopped eating it, it may bloom and then I'll know if I have one each M&F.

Here is a link that might be useful: oldfashionedliving.com


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

spedigrees - it's not a tick. It's hama hama hakki - aka the itsy bitsy spider, climbing the water spout. My daughter was 2 when we bought this house and on one of the first days here we saw a big daddy long legs climbing the gutter. So once we moved in, and got brand new gutters - one of the first things I did was paint a spider on one. Which kinda set the stage for everything else I've done with this house!

And I planted the nasturtiums so that I could decorate our nightly salads with fresh nasturtiums blossoms. I guess I shouldn't have picked such a pretty variety of nasturtiums!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

spedigrees - I forgot to mention that the clock runs on battery. Each side of the clock face is powered separately - and takes either 1 or 2 AA batteries - I don't remember. Then each side takes 2 D cells to power the LED lights. Unfortunately I didn't read the fine print when I bought the clock, so didn't purchase D batteries, and had none around the house. But so far I haven't needed to check the time outside when it is dark outside. So not sure if I'm going to bother to purchase the D batteries at this point!

The side I have facing the patio also boasts a barometer and a thermometer. But they are really tiny on the clock face and I really can't read them unless I get real close. I have a thermometer mounted on a nearby tree - which is big enough so that I can see it from inside the house. And I don't know enough about meteorology to interpret barometer readings. So I should turn the clock around, but it's pretty heavy, so I haven't gotten around to doing that yet.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Pixie Lou - what matters with a barometer is what it's doing relative to where it's been. If it's rising, the weather is getting better; if it's falling, weather will get worse (rain/storms); if it's staying the same, no change. It won't tell you anything about temperature, just potential storminess.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

LOL My arthritic joints tell me when the barometric pressure is falling, and the barometer on my wall always confirms it!

Jane, thanks for the link to nasturtium recipes. I had never heard of most of these applications; I was only familiar with their use in salads.

And your daylilies look lovely set off by your white picket fence!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jun 23, 12 at 11:59

My Itea virginicas (Virginia Sweetspire) are now in full bloom and they waited until the Hydrangea Blue Billow began to flower, for which I thank them profusely.

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Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

This garden is on top of a stone wall, which is almost invisible now under the cotoneasters. It's one of my favorite gardens when at its prime, which starts about now. The Zepherine Drouhin rose is in bloom and the meadow phlox (Phlox maculata) is beginning. There are some yellow nummularia flowers underneath on the wall. I'm still waiting for the Hosta Blue Angel to send up its white flowers, and the hydrangea should get even bluer.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

I really appreciate being able to see everyone's gardens; I'm not around many gardeners in real life, so this is great.

Pixie_lou--I am jealous of your pond! And I love your campanula; it is something that is missing from my yard...it's going on the list! And that heliotrope! Oh--and the white lilies!

Steve----I LOVE the blue and yellow container planting!!!

Claire--your peonies are gorgeous! And the turkeys are adorable.

thyme2dig---that wisteria is beautiful(it's going on my wishlist). The climbing hydrangea looks great--I'm sure your MIL is looking down on it! I have a 4 year old; I hope I don't have to wait that long for blooms. Beautiful stone steps you have there next to your ninebark. I am envious.

nhbabs----beautiful beds; you have so much going on!

molie----what a pretty flower bed; and I love the turtle pics!

As usual, I feel like my gardens are behind schedule compared to everyone else's. Here sre some pics of some stuff I've had going on for June:

I love the color of these peonies, but I'm not sure of the variety:

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Ernest Markham clematis, I believe:

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Ninebark; I have way too many in my yard, but I'm a sucker for red/brown/purple foliage:

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Crimson Sky rose....always lots of blooms, but the foliage is a little lacking:

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This is the best my foxglove border has ever looked, and sadly I had to move the whole bed two days after I took this picture. My neighbors is having a fence installed and I've been busy moving that whole side of my yard; all the flower beds were 10 feet onto her property!

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I did not think much of this clematis(Pistachio) when I received it as a gift, but I have grown quite fond of it now:

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I wish I knew the variety of rose this is because it does so well in part shade and is very disease resistant:

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I love feverfew and it can reseed all over my yard if it wishes:

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Seafoam rose:

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Jackmanii:

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Climbing White Dawn:

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My annuals are just starting to bloom, there's not much to take pictures of yet. Here are some winter sown bachelor's button's just beginning:

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I can't wait for July. I am simply DYING for more blooms in my yard!

Teresa


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 27, 12 at 11:28

Very nice, girlcat36; I particularly like the pic of the ninebark with the sun face and shingles/cedar shakes in the background.

Not technically in my garden, but this morning a neighbor showed me some plants that recently appeared by the road across the street. Neither of us had a clue what they were, but I found them in William Cullina's New England Wildflower Society Guide to Wildflowers, and then online at the CT Botanical Society site. Spotted Pipsissewa!(Chimaphila maculata AKA Spotted Wintergreen). There seems to be at least two different ways of spelling pippsissewa/pipsissewa. A wonderful name to say, though.

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Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The flower buds aren't completely open yet. I hope they cross the street to my yard - if the poison ivy can do it so easily, it should be a snap for the pipsissewa.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

So that is pipsissewa. I just noticed the same flowers while on a walk in the woods yesterday. And I have some of that foliage growing in my shade garden - but checked for blossoms and none. Mine is growing amongst Canadian Mayflower.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 27, 12 at 17:20

There's another pipsissewa, Prince's Pine, with solid green foliage. They're both supposedly really dependent on mycorrhizal fungi to survive, so you must have a good soil environment. I hesitate to try to transplant these since my mayflowers (Trailing Arbutus, not Canadian Mayflower) died out after a couple of years. They're fussy about fungi too.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Here are a few pics of my garden areas. Most of this is less than two years old, so it will need time to look established. Thought I'd mention that because I know my garden lacks the "New England look" for now......but I thought I'd share anyway.

A visitor seemed to like my Yucca recurvifolia!
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Hesperaloe parvifolia (aka "Red Yucca" although not a yucca)
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Coreopsis verticillata is covered with flowers.
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Cactus flowers and lavender both bloom profusely.
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Iris "Wine Cups" and Penstemon "Dark Towers" in the boulder garden.
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Another view
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Old fashioned daylilies and oak leaf hydrangea
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View of part of the boulder garden and smaller east patio.
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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 27, 12 at 18:06

Marvelous photos, Bill! Did you get a new camera?

You're right it's mostly not a "New England look", although the daylily and hydrangea combination (great combo) has two New England standards.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Claire,

No new camera, just my trusty old Fuji S602 digital. I am always looking at newer ones, but I haven't found one yet that gives me such true colors, particularly the huge variety of shades of green. So, as a gardener, that is important to me.

I suppose the boulder garden could have a "New England" look though, since we have plenty of rocks around here!

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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Very nice pictures, Bill. I love the stonework around your boulder garden, and the lavender and daylilies are beautiful. Did you add sand to your soil to accommodate the cacti and other desert plants? Do they require special protection in winter, or are you far enough south for them to do well on their own?


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Spedigrees,
Thanks for the compliment!

I didn't amend the soil for the xeric garden. It's in the front of the house, and faces south. It's sunny all day. I did create a gentle slope from the centers of the two beds getting lower toward the edges, so the drainage, while subtle, is still OK. I think the real help comes from the stone mulch. It helps to keep the plants high and dry in winter, which is when they would be vulnerable to rot if they are wet when cold. It also helps to absorb heat and warm things up just a bit. But there's no protection of any kind. There are cacti, sedums, sempervivums, yuccas, as well as lavenders, that should be totally hardy in your zone, but I'd recommend a similar site and stone mulch.

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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

girlcat - is that a double white clematis you posted a photo of? Also is the pistachio celmatis white? Or a pale green? I also have a Jackmani Clematis, but it hasn't bloomed yet. Maybe it's not happy in its location? But since yours is blooming, mine should at least have blossoms.

Bill - I really like that cactus and lavendar combination.

As for my garden here at the tail end of June - I'm amazed at all the different colors of Cosmos Picotee. Here's another striped one.
Cosmos Picotee

Shasta Daisy Alaska
Shasta Daisy Alaska

Double Fever Few, Rose Campion and Stella D'Oro Day Lilies are dominating the border gardens.
Fever Few Rose Campion Day Lillies

My daughters impatiens are happily accompanying the pot people in the whimsy garden.
Impatiens and Pot People

White Astilbe in the shade garden
Astilbe

Sugar Snap Peas
Peas

Does anyone recognize this yellow flower behind the day lily? Last year someone on this forum identified it as Ligularia The Rocket, based on foliage only. But these are not the proper flowers. The plant stands at least 4' tall.
Ligularia


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Pixie Lou,
Thanks for the positive comment. I'm not sure what that yellow flower is, but it's definitely not Ligularia. I have seen some weeds that look similar but the flowers on your mystery plant appear to be fairly large, and the weed I have seen has medium flowers. The leaves and stems are arranged the same though.

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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Great stuff, Bill!

Pixielou--I believe the double white clematis is Duchess of Edinburgh; and the Pistachio clematis seems to be white to me and I have it in my white garden.....but with a name like pistachio it probably tends toward pale green, just not in my yard. It's doing very well in a fairly shaded area.
That mystery plant is quite interesting looking!
Your snap peas look great, how fat do you let them get before you pick them? We have an overabundance of them and I can't keep them picked before they get too fat. I like them really thin but they seem to ripen so fast.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Great stuff, Bill!

Pixielou--I believe the double white clematis is Duchess of Edinburgh; and the Pistachio clematis seems to be white to me and I have it in my white garden.....but with a name like pistachio it probably tends toward pale green, just not in my yard. It's doing very well in a fairly shaded area.
That mystery plant is quite interesting looking!
Your snap peas look great, how fat do you let them get before you pick them? We have an overabundance of them and I can't keep them picked before they get too fat. I like them really thin but they seem to ripen so fast.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Looks like I missed the whole month of June.
I think everyone is having a great garden this year. I don't know about anyone else, but the weather has been almost ideal so far. I've hardly had to water the garden. I've had less insect damage then any other gardening season I can remember.

Steve, nice container on your deck and I love that cute Mouse Ears Hosta in the container. I've always wondered how to use that. It seems like it could get lost in the garden. I think that is perfect. And the container with the Papyrus in it'. that should give you memories of Africa all summer.

Thyme2dig, that's one of the prettiest mountain laurel's I've seen in some time. Love it's shape. When did you get the American Wisteria? I just discovered they existed this year. First time I've seen one in a garden. I like it a lot. Is it fragrant and is it the beast that the other wisterias are? I'm very sorry to hear about your Mother in Law and wow on that climbing Hydrangea. Imagine the timing of it. It's GORGEOUS!

nhbabs, I am new to clematis and enjoying mine. That HFYoung is having a good year. Did you plant the bed near your DH's shop? Very pretty!

mollie'.nice effect with your river garden and can't imagine how you managed to get a snapping turtle to show up just in time for the photo'lol. Great story about the Shasta running down the hill. Gave me a good laugh.

Very pretty lilies, pixie lou, I'm still waiting for mine.
And enjoying your nasturtiums that I didn't plant this year.

Claire, your garden is abundant and lush as usual. Those turkeys'..fun to watch them grow. They look at home in your garden. Nice healthy Itea. The peonies are spectacular. Are any of them fragrant?

girl cat, you have a lot of bloom for June, makes me wonder what you have coming up in July. (g) Love that white astilbe and your border of foxglove does look SO pretty! I like that color Crimson Sky rose. It looks nice with the color on your door.

Bill, I was hoping we would see more photos of your new garden. I'm feeling some boulder envy this morning. (g) I love the size, color,shape and placement of them. What kind of rock is it? I have that 'Dark Towers' Penstemon but it flopped with the first rain after blooming. That is a very eye catching combo with one of the prettiest color Iris I've seen. LOVE it. And I don't always enjoy daylilies but in combination with the hydrangea, it's very effective.

Love that whimsey garden, Pixie Lou!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Wow! What great garden views since I last checked this site ---- a while ago another grandchild was born and so I've been busy :)

Claire, I've always admired Zepherine Drouhin because of its color and lack of thorns but was discouraged from buying it because I was told it has a short bloom season --- true or false?

Bill, I am a real sucker for rock outcroppings and rock landscaping so I'm pretty jealous of the view of your steps with Penstemon and Iris Wine Cups, which I'll definitely research. That was a fantastic photo of your Yucca visitor --- you're either a professional or great with that Fuji camera.

Girlcat36, I hope your foxglove border survived the transplant and, if not, that they will reseed anyhow for next seasons. What a beautiful combo ---- Climbing White Dawn and lights on an arbor!

PixieLou, your daughter is a lucky girl to have her own animal garden. I'm predicting that she will follow in her mother's footsteps and become a great gardener too.

So --- after looking at all the photos and realizing that June is almost done, I've decided to post June photos taken throughout the month. One series was taken after a rainstorm and the other on a calm, hazy day when the trees across the river were reflected on the water. Then there are just some of my favorite perennials.

Earlier in June --- river view to the right

More of the funky reflection-- a minimally different shot

One of my favorite daylily, Royal Eventide, in front of Miscanthus 'Gold Breeze'

Royal Eventide close up

Dick Clark Rose after the rain -- filled with water

Dick's true colors shown in this photo

Hollyhock 'Spotlight Mars Magic' in its first season. I've been told it's a true perennial. We'll see about that

Filipendula beginning to open

My new Grace Ward Phlox (thanks, Bill for the shopping tip) between two Liriope

Molie


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

And oops! I forgot to include a view of the river to the left, which gave a wider reflection on this day in early June.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jun 30, 12 at 11:55

PM2: Most of my peonies are fragrant - maybe all of them, but I've moved some recently and they haven't flowered again yet. I have allergies so my sense of smell is endangered.

molie: Zepherine Drouhin has a major spring flush, and then will sporadically bloom until frost, with often a few blooms, but only a few, on the canes. It won't be very showy after spring, but one or two blooms in November is a delight.

Your river view is wonderful - I can imagine you being riveted to your deck chair.

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Molie,
I like the daylilies and miscanthus combo. If I may, the "Grace Ward" is a Lithodora, not a phlox.....

Ann, thanks. I don't know for sure what the rocks are exactly. I know the landscape contractor got them in Connecticut, and they were the same warmer tones as the rock that he has used in all of the retaining walls, planters and other steps. The curved granite steps were my idea though. I'll try to take some photos of the boulder garden soon, but I am somewhat hesitant, because the plants haven't really had time to develop yet and, well.....because that part of my garden isn't "New Englandy" enough for this forum and I don't want to offend. Personally I like how it looks and it has been a long time dream of mine. Before there was a very high maintenance bank all along that side of the house from street to the back of the property. Not only was it very hard to take care of, but all the space was wasted, and also it made the back yard and house appear separate from the upper lot. In fact most people didn't think it was mine. Now the boulders and steps tie it all together, and it's a lot easier to care for. Bonus: the space that was taken up by the bank is now the boulder garden, east patio and lawn areas, and the driveway. You can see this in my last photo above.

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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Yikes, Bill! You are correct --- it IS a Lithodora that I bought after seeing it on your post. Silly Mole!

Also, I disagree that your front garden isn't "New Englandy" enough. I'm thinking of all those gardens I've seen near the water along NE's extensive shoreline or on the islands. I think what "holds together" all of us and makes us New England gardeners is our thrifty and fearless nature --- we grow plants perhaps not for our zones/find ways to extend the growing season/fight the forces of wind and water/and work around all the things Mother Nature dumped on us when the ice melted. To live and to garden in New England you have to be a bit tough!

Molie


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Bill, I had to go back and look at your photos again to see whether they have that 'New England' look to them. Then I wondered what the heck is a New England look? (g) I don't know, I'm thinking a lot of people on the forums lean toward 'cottage' type garden styles. That seems to be the style in my mind that I associate with New England. Or colonial gardens with some formality and casual garden elements together. But, in reality, I see very few cottage style gardens, in my area. I see all kinds of different styles.

And your rocks are actually from CT, so how much more New England can it be? To me, any garden that is well designed and well cared for draws me like a magnet and I really enjoy it. And when someone has taken the time to think through how to make something less work and easier to keep it going, then it get's an A+ in my opinion.

I sincerely look forward to seeing your garden mature and would not be surprised if you were on a garden tour in a few years.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Molie, the front garden is what I call the 'xeric' or dry garden. That's sunny all day and has the cacti, yucca, hesperaloe (the red one in the photo above),lavender, coreopsis, sedums, sempervivums, ice plants, lithodora and more. Whether or not is has the "New England" look or not, it is certainly uncommon around here. Having said that, I like it, and that's what matters I guess.

Ann, you're right. They are from CT so they are "New England". And the boulders have provided a great area for me to tuck little fillers and spreading plants in nooks and crannies. By cutting back the bank that was all along that side of the house from street to back of property, and building the long wall (visible in the last photo) I was able to make the small (15 x 15 feet) patio on the east side of the house. It's nice because I could have morning coffee out there even when it was only in the 50's as long as it was dry and sunny. That side is sunny in the morning and protected from the west and northwest wind. I had a lot of other work done the previous year, and the entire west side of the yard was totally redone. There I have a moderate sized patio (11 x 19 feet) right as you come out the rear door. That one is great for coffee when it's warmer because it's shaded by the house in the morning. Also nice for evening glass of wine to watch the sun go down. I'm on a hill, so views and breezes are kind of nice. I also had a much larger patio (I call it the terrace to distinguish) that is about 40 x 25 feet. All three of these patio areas are paved, so maintenance is minimal. Last piece of the puzzle will be a privacy structure around the lower patio.

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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jun 30, 12 at 17:14

I can't really grasp the idea of a "New England" garden - there are so many different environments and so many different gardening styles here that I don't think any one style can rule. We have gardeners who've lived here for most or all of their lives, and they have very unusual gardens. We also have transplanted gardeners who have embraced the prevailing style and have classic gardens.

I myself am obsessed with fitting my garden as seamlessly as possible into my local rural coastal setting. I sometimes wonder what style I would use if I lived in an urban setting where my perceived "rules" would be much broader. It's very different when your surroundings are more architectural rather than forests. I might even go in the direction Bill has - who knows?

Anyway, I have my own personal version of a "New England" garden, which is very unlike most of the neighbors' gardens. I just realized it's the last day of June and I want to post a few more photos representative of today.

Adenophora is now appearing and complements the meadow phlox (Phlox maculata) which is almost everywhere. I like it with the miscanthus foliage as backdrop.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

and my beloved rambling rose Excelsa is recovering from the loss of its arch. Some of you may remember the photos of the old arch that succumbed to a windstorm. The arch marked the gateway to the back yard - the roses were cut back fiercely and I've tried to train them to grow in parallel rows to the back rather than overhead. I may be losing this battle. The roses aren't quite as floriferous yet as they used to be, but they're getting there.

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Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Claire


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

It's the end of June and so a new thread will begin! But I have to say that I admire the variety of all the June gardens, above, and have found many plants I'd love to own.

Claire, the "missing" arbor (I do remember the posting of when it fell down in the wind) now looks like a secret opening or passageway into the back garden. It's kind of neat, I think!

Bill, I love the idea of all those patios and places to rest and enjoy the views that you've created. Plus, I think that stonework sets off plantings very well. It's nice that you have warm, sunny places and cooler shadier spots in your yard. Sounds like you've created some interesting outdoor rooms and PM2 is right --- maybe we will see your gardens on a Garden Conservancy Tour!

I'm a lot more than mildly jealous scrolling up and looking at girlcat36's clematis because mine are sadly browed out. Lately, because I haven't been taking care of my gardens as I should, there's also been an explosion in Japanese beetles on my roses --- very sad. But on the positive side, I did follow all of your earlier suggestion for eliminating the Red Lily Beetle. Now my lilies are starting to open.

Molie


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

I went to the Name That Plant Forum and it appears that my mystery yellow plant is telekia speciosa. The more the blooms are opening, the more I am enjoying the plant.

Bill - please post more of your garden photos on these threads. How boring this thread would be if everyone only posted photos of day lilies and roses. How many people are now lusting after lithodora since you posted photos of yours.

girlcat - thanks for the info on the clematises. I think you are aware that I also have a white garden. As for the peas - they don't have the opportunity to get too big. My daughter will sit in the garden and pick peas to eat. I go out every other day and pick all available and steam them up for dinner. I do pick on the smaller side since they get stringy if they get too big.

As for a cute pea story - we were at a wedding this afternoon. We were served "steamed summer vegetables" as part of dinner. My daughter took one bite of a snow pea and promptly announced to everyone at the table "I can tell you that these are not organic so I'm not going to eat them. I can taste it."

Molie - granted my river goes through the woods, but seeing your river view is getting me motivated to get out behind the pond and clear down to my river.

I just posted the July thread - but we have to wait until tomorrow to post to it!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Bill, when I look at your photos, it seems like it was a huge job to do that hardscape. It really is a great satisfaction to have a plan in mind for how you want a garden to look and then see it actually happen. I think all gardeners love that aspect of gardening. And the changes you've made are so dramatic. I wonder how your neighbors like the change? I do see the patio and driveway in that last photo and are you planning the privacy structure for next year? What are you going to put up? Sounds like a great opportunity for vines. Your property with the view and the breezes and sheltered patios etc. sounds very enjoyable.

There are a lot of lucky gardeners on these forums. Everyone seems to have their own little slice of gardening heaven.

And Molie, your views are wonderful! You must love it there.

Claire makes a great point. Many times the piece of land we have and our area influence what we create. And we all have conditions that usually give direction to what will grow well, but even within those parameters, we all have such freedom to choose from so many plants and end up with gardens that are so different from each other. Any garden, even if it's just a small patio with containers is such a pleasure to enjoy every day. We are all really lucky.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Ann,
I am hoping to get the privacy structure in this year. It will go along one side of the largest patio. The steel pipes are already in place. They will be completely enclosed by square wooden 'columns' which will support a lattice/trellis. I've already bought some vines for it....Gelsmium sempervirens 'Margarita'. I like it because it's one of the few evergreen vines that grow here and so it has leaves all winter, and it's covered in bright yellow looms in spring. I have one that's been on the back neighbor's fence for about 6 years now.

This was taken this year:
Photobucket

A closer look:
Photobucket

I plan to use some annual vines as well, and probably clematis too. Who doesn't like clematis?

Photobucket


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

I love the variety of photos and styles that show up here, whether or not it's traditional "New England" gardens, or the wilder edges of our yards and native scenery that we borrow as part of our view, or the way our houses fit into our gardens, or hardscape.

I think I will have to try the Gelsmium sempervirens 'Margarita'. I've been eyeing it at Lazy S's for a couple of years, but I need to find a spot where it will be well sheltered. I don't expect it will be evergreen for me, though.

PM2 - Yes, I planted the shop bed. It's the only garden bed I've ever planned. Usually they just sort of evolve depending on what plants have struck my fancy, but this one was designed to distract from and partly hide the work area, sheds, and solar panels behind them from the main approach to the shop (and eventually our house) so it needed some planning for size of plants (can't get tall enough to block the solar), some evergreens, and all season interest.


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

@Bill --- The Iris "Wine Cups" shown with your Penstemons looks like a fairly short Japanese Iris, to me. Where did you find it? I love both Japanese and Siberian forms of Iris, but both tend to really spread and grow too large or wide for my gardens. Your Wine Cups seems very well-behaved!

Molie


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Molie,
The Iris are about 20-24 inches tall. They were only planted last June (2011) so they haven't spread much yet. And I had the wrong name. They are called "Wine Ruffles". Anyway I got both those and the Penstemon at Home Depot.

Photobucket


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Bill, I hadn't heard of doing steel pipes with columns over them to support trellis. What a great idea! That sounds like it will last a long time and be gorgeous. I sort of thought you might be planning on using 'Margarita'. I love it. And you are right, who doesn't like clematis....lol. I had one white 'Duchess of Edinburg' for a long time, and the only thing that stopped me from having more was no vertical space to put them. Now I have a couple of small trellis with first and second year clematis and I love them. The only problem is once you get started, you want more. (g)

Babs, Solar panels? How do you like having them?


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Bill - If you haven't thought about using PVC boxes over your steel pipes, they also work (not structurally sound by themselves, but good over steel supports) and can be quite low maintenance - no warping, no rot, no painting or staining, just an occasional scrub. Some folks don't like the aesthetics, but they are easy. Not sure what colors it's available in other than white, since that's what we've used. You can get it thicker than the typical fence post covers and build your own boxes if wanted.

PM2 - The solar panels are great. They provide more than enough power for the shop (except for the 3 phase used by large machines, provided by a generator since we are near the end of the line and don't want to brown out the neighbors) and we use the power grid as our battery so the only cost is the meter fee. (NH has net metering so the meter runs backward when we are generating.) When we eventually have a house down here we will use the extra power to reduce the house bills. Since we have the space, pole mounted panels are more efficient since they don't heat up as much in summer as roof mounted, easily adjust seasonally, and have simple snow removal on the infrequent occasions that they don't self-clear.

This picture was taken fairly early on, when the west end of the bed was brand new and the rest of the bed hadn't grown much and I hadn't yet filled in with large perennials and clematis. It gives you a slight idea of what I'm trying to distract from in addition to the solar panels: storage sheds, propane tank, and lots of stored raw material that goes into making bowls and heating the house and shop. (I usually try to take my photos to reduce the visual impact of these since they aren't and won't ever be totally hidden.)

From June 2010


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

Ah....that's a good photo of what you're working with. I didn't know that they could install solar panels without a roof. Very interesting. And you must love to see your meter going backwards! Do you have a back up generator too? Those are some huge tree trunks. They must make great projects. I would love to have a 'green house' with solar panels and other design features that saved more energy. Your bed has grown quite a bit and I see you mounded it up to give more height. Lots going on at your house!


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RE: Show us your gardens - a photo thread - June 2012

NHBabs,
I had considered the PVC covers but the pipes were installed with the idea of making square wood columns over them. Later I looked into PVC and vinyl, but they don't make them large enough for the larger pipes that are in place. They fit two and one half inch pipes but not three inch. But I think treated wood allowed to go natural will be OK. I hope so.

Photobucket


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