Return to the New England Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Posted by pixie_lou 5 (My Page) on
Wed, Jun 26, 13 at 20:15

Heading out of town for the weekend tomorrow. So posting this now. Will work on trying to get links to work when I get back. This is the honor system. Do not post here until Monday!
***********************************

This is a place to post photos, and to discuss, what is in your garden. This is the thread for July 2013. All garden photos are welcome. As we enter summer, the emphasis will be on blossoms. However, all landscape and garden photos are welcome. If it is a photo taken in your garden or your yard, it is fair game to post it here.

Even though links still seem not to work, I am posting them here in the hopes that they will soon work again!

Here is the link for the July 2012 part 2thread and the July 2012 part 1 thread.

For previous 2013 threads:
June 2013 part 2

June 2013 part 1

May 2013

April 2013 part 1

April 2013 Part 2

March 2013

February 2013

January 2013

To see all of the 2012 threads, please click on the December 2012 link. The first post will have links to all previous months.

I am (still) in process of moving all the 2011 threads over to the
photo gallery
. I need to look up who I’m supposed to e-mail. Plus I have to make the list.

FWIW - if we have 50 posts in this thread by 15 July, then I will make a July Part II thread.

This post was edited by pixie_lou on Fri, Jul 12, 13 at 22:22


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Most of my plants are seriously behind schedule thanks to the past rainy month, but I found this surprise bloom today on my hen and chicks. I actually had no idea hen & chicks bloomed at all! I bought this plant last spring and wintered it over in the basement, then placed it in the garden last month. And now a pink flower! Who knew!?


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 1, 13 at 17:28

It's Monday now, and it's the start of meadow phlox season! They're almost everywhere - I've taken out armfuls and they're still almost everywhere. But the hummingbirds love them and so do I. Easy bloom for the summer with occasional deadheading. Some daylilies around too and of course the roses, but the rains (finally!) took off a lot of rose petals.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The Blue Billow hydrangea is blooming and the iteas waited for it. I missed some meadow phlox there although I took out most of them.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

There's some moneywort (nummularia) on the wall under the hydrangea. There really is a wall under there somewhere.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The bees have happily moved from the iteas to the hydrangea.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

On the other (south) side of the house is my alley which used to have a rose arch as the entrance until the wind took it down. I really loved that rose arch but I must admit it's nice to be able to walk around the corner of the house without having to crouch over to avoid the rose thorns.

This is where the arch used to be.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

I still have the roses, but now the ramblers are on stilts running over the Phlox Protection Zone. You can just see the start of the roses here. I'm hoping they'll spread further. Actually, there is no way to stop them - this is a VERY robust rose, the Cape Cod Rambler Rose Excelsa. I keep on adding shepherd hooks as the canes grow longer.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

This is the first year the roses have been on stilts and they seem to like it. The roses are above the Phlox Protection Zone with more meadow phlox in the zone. The meadow phlox don't need protection from the woodchucks but the phlox paniculatas do.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

I used to love seeing the rose arch outside my kitchen windows so I hoped that I would still be able to see some roses on stilts out of at least one window. I needn't have worried.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

And one more modest little rose, Rose 'Carefree Delight', which always makes me smile.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Claire

This post was edited by claire on Tue, Jul 2, 13 at 10:40


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 1, 13 at 17:30

spedigrees posted while I was laboring over my long post. That's a very pretty little flower! I hope you get more.

Claire


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Spedigrees,
yes as you have seen, Sempervivums ("Hens and chicks") do bloom. The blooming rosette (the "Hen") will die after flowering, but the offshoots ("chicks") will continue to grow and spread. I have several varieties and they seem to find their own happy places over time. I can remember ages ago in my grandmother's garden where she had them it seemed forever. You said that you overwintered indoors, but if you find a sunny spot with good drainage, they should survive in your area. What kills most succulents isn't the cold, but standing in wetness in winter, so site them where the water won't collect. You might want to plant them on a small mound, which needn't be too obvious, so a gentle slope with plant at the top would suffice. Of course if your garden has a natural look (as mine does) then you can even place a large rock, build soil behind it to make it look like it belongs there anyway, and plant the sempervivum above/behind the rock. They do need sun but it doesn't have to be full sun all day. I added a link to a place that sells them and other hardy succulents as well, but I haven't ordered from here (yet!) because several local nurseries have a great variety of these plants.

Photobucket

Here is a link that might be useful: Simply Succulents


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Thank you for the wealth of info about succulents, Bill. I actually have two upward growing "hens," one of which is flowering in the photo and the larger original "hen" to the left of it, that is about to flower. Interesting that these are fated to die off after flowering, but there are many "chicks surrounding them to carry on.

With all this rain I am amazed that the plant is still viable. I did mix gravel with the dirt in the pot, so I guess the drainage it provides is saving it. Also the overhanging branches of a shrub may be sheltering it somewhat from the downpours we've had recently. Unfortunately the bush is also shading it from the sun it probably wishes it had. Perhaps it would be happier if I moved the pot back to the front porch where it would be out of the rain and have more sun? It spent the early part of spring, up until memorial day, there.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

I just love your roses, Claire, and that window is a beautiful artistic setting, on both sides of the glass. I remember your rose arbor and how charming it looked. It is too bad it fell victim to the winds.

I am glad that the animals around here haven't developed a taste for phlox, and have spared me from having to set up my own phlox protection zone!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Names, Claire, names! We all KNOW that's a hydrangea! What we want to know is, what is the name of it? It's gorgeous!

Beautiful pics and a beautiful garden!

Spedigrees, 15+ years ago I bought this house, a house that had no appearance of any gardening on the part of the previous owner, apart from some way-too-big shrubs in front of the house that I'm still dealing with. However, out in a little outcropping of stone ledge, we came across a small planting of hens and chicks. To this day I often muse on who in the house planted it and why. But I remember the first time, about 12 years ago, that I saw it bloom. I too hadn't realized they threw these tall blooms out! They don't bloom every year (I think they've bloomed only twice in the time I've been here, but they take a lot of abuse (foot traffic, weedwhacking - yes, they are in a bad spot!) and now the encroaching shade. I often think I should move them but then despite all the setbacks they really do well in this spot, even if they don't bloom.

Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Dee - Blue Billow hydrangea. I agree that Claire's garden is stunning.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Aha! I thought that was a Blue Billow, (hoped it was!) but since I just got one at our last swap and it hasn't quite colored up yet, I wasn't sure. Wow, can't wait! I'm very much looking forward to this one. Thank you Marty!

:)
Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 3, 13 at 11:01

Thanks, spedigrees, nhbabs and Dee, for the compliments. This is a nice time of year in my garden.

Dee, the Blue Billow hydrangea has been troublefree for me and just keeps expanding. It's in shade a lot of the day which they say is necessary for it and it's never wilted. Any more sun would probably be a problem.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The Hosta 'Blue Angel' next to it should be blooming soon - I'm hoping the hydrangea waits for the hosta.

Claire


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Boy, your garden is certainly hitting it's stride, Claire! Gor-geous!! Love that phlox, it's native isn't it? And the Itea and the Hydrangea make a great pair.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

claire - your gardens really are gorgeous. they have a wonderful maturity to them!

I came home to my Easter Lilies in bloom. The trumpet lilies are the last to emerge in the spring, so are least affected by rlb.

white garden photo IMG_6517_zps97bc712f.jpg

waster lily photo IMG_6518_zpsf74e2798.jpg

Echinaceas are starting to open. This one is Hot Papaya
echinacea hot papaya photo IMG_6497_zps4dbe2081.jpg

And white cygnet - a tiny little white echinacea
white cygnet photo IMG_6506_zps90d215b1.jpg

My border gardens are starting to fill out. Ditch lillies, fever few, yellow primrose, shasta daisy, and rose campion. I love the color combination!
border photo IMG_6510_zps797f3d9d.jpg

border photo IMG_6491_zpsc449f9a0.jpg

Here's a close up of the day lilies with shasta daisy alaska
day lily and shasta daisy photo IMG_6524_zps856efdca.jpg

And a close up of another day lily with rose campion
day lily and rose campion photo IMG_6523_zpsab50a3c6.jpg


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Pixie lou,

Very nice combinations.
But...... a Japanese beetle on your "Hot Papaya"! Do you hand pick or use other control? I can say, so far, I haven't seen many of those in several years, and I hope the trend continues.

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Bill - I thought that was a Japanese beetle. It was the only one I saw on the plant. So I pulled it off and crushed it. I haven't seen Japanese beetles in years. And I hadn't gotten around to running an image search yet.

I did notice a brown patch of grass in the lawn. And I'm thinking grubs. But with this heat, I haven't gotten around to grabbing a shovel and looking for the buggers. This echinacea is in the middle of a patch of bee balm, which attracts lots of bees, so I'm hesitant to try insecticides.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

I think hand picking will be effective unless the numbers really increase, which would make it impossible. I hope that's the only one in your garden, and for that matter, all of New England!

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 6, 13 at 15:59

pixie_lou: I agree with Bill that your daylily combinations are very nice and I envy you the Easter lilies. I still haven't had any lily blooms here although I have lots of buds.

Meadow phlox dominate now, this is the view from my porch steps.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

And embedded in the phlox is the daylily Rosy Returns. I don't really understand why they named them 'Rosy', they look more 'Salmon' to me, but I guess 'Salmon Returns' doesn't have the snazz to it.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Down by the road Hosta 'Big Daddy' is blooming. Amazingly, there are no phlox down there (yet), but the hosta is surrounded by white wood aster. This is my first hosta to bloom.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Claire


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

What lovely photos! Love the combination of Blue Billow Hydrangea and the hostas. Love Claire's walkway. Pink roses against weathered shingles are gorgeous! Great close-up of Rosie Returns.

Phlox aren't blooming yet here in my neck of NH. Echinacae is just starting. One perennial bed looks great from the road because some of the plants have spread to big patches of color. But the spreaders are choking out other more docile things.

There's an open garden day in Chichester NH on July 13 that sounds like my kind of place. Love Fortnam Gardens but Deanne's choices are too tropical for me. She's an amazing gardener and well worth the trip.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Claire, that new bluestone pathway was well worth the effort, it looks spectacular!

Pixie Lou, I love your Easter Lilies. I can imagine how fragrant they are and they look good there. Did you plant a pot from Easter?

I see the first three blooms are open on 'Orania' Lily this morning but I'll wait to post a photo until more are open. The summer garden is starting to bloom. Echinaceas are suddenly full of open blossoms, next to Heliopsis 'Midwest Dreams'. I'll get a photo of those this week when the lilies bloom.

Here are a few things that are blooming right now....

Butterfly Bush...


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013 /

First morning glory....


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden / a photo thread - July 2013

Fragrant Angel Echinacea....


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013 2

And the vegetable garden.....


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Chocolate Habernero Pepper plant finally starting to grow with more sun.....


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Claire, your garden looks wonderful. I love the walkway too. No mowing...yaay.

Pixie lou, your lilies are pretty. I am so jealous of your echinacea. Mine are being eaten by something. They eat the petals and leaves. Only veins are left on the leaves. The leaves on the sunflower are also being eaten. No visible culprits upon inspection of leaves and under side of leaves. I go out to inspect early morning, 8:30 in the evening, and a couple times during the day. Not slugs. I did see a couple of leafhoppers on another plant. Saw some powdery white fluff that hops away when I touch it on the stems of some of the echinacea. Doing detective work right now to figure out the culprits.

 photo echinacea_zps042a6c0c.jpg

 photo sunflower_zpsf5684fe5.jpg

My daylily. Such a surprise since a bunch came with the house but were in the shade under a conifer and never bloomed. I moved this one into the sun to see what would happen.
 photo orangedoubledaylily_zpsc1187f0d.jpg

PM2, your morning glories look good. I do not even have buds yet.

The Asclepia incarnata looks nice though...And, I get the occasional bumble bee visitors.
 photo Aincarnata_zps035e53a9.jpg

-Tina


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Tina, did you notice any earwigs when you go out at night? I had awful damage to echinaceas, basil, and lots of other plants and during the day I would see nothing. With a flashlight at night, I found lots of earwigs and used a cup of soapy water to knock them into. I skipped a couple of years of having them because it's been dry, but this year with all the rain, I am seeing a little more of them.

And today I noticed what I think are Asian beetles on marigolds, and roses in the morning. I don't usually get many Japanese Beetles, but I get a few of these....


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

I agree that your bluestone walkway is absolutely beautiful, Claire. Prairiemoon, I'm envious of your vegetable garden. Mine is stunted and unhappy from lack of sun. I also love the hot papaya echinacea, Pixie. For some reason I have zero luck growing echinacea. Love the double daylily too, Tina.

Those things in my gardens that are growing and blooming are choked with weeds due to the lack of non-rainy days suitable for weeding. The only thing that seems to be liking the current growing conditions is my little kitchen herb garden. (I reconfigure this cement block wall to hold a sheet of plexiglass to form a sort of mini greenhouse for my started plants from seed early in the spring.)

The chives on the far left in the metal pot have been heavenly on baked potatoes with sour cream, and the basil and thyme in the wooden box in the center have also been wonderful, but the parsley in the terracotta pot is some sort of bland flavorless variety. I guess next year I should buy parsley seeds from an organic heirloom seed catalog instead of picking them out of a rack at the hardware store! I'm hoping to save seeds from the thyme and basil, and winter over the chives in the cellar. The marigolds are 8th or 9th generation that I grow each year from saved seeds. The rest of the marigold plants are in the orange garden. I'm crossing my fingers that the Japanese beetles do not decimate them as they did last year.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

PM2, that beetle sure does look comfy in your pretty marigold....like a luxurious feather bed. Yes, I am seeing a lot of the Asian beetles. I saw on the internet they are also referred to as Oriental beetles or chafer beetles. I'm seeing less of the Japanese beetles.

Now that you mentioned earwigs...I saw one on my Monarda. I found black salt grain size poop on the Monarda leaves. Could be the earwigs.

speedigrees, I am now hungry for a baked potato with sour cream and chives! The basil also looks very good. Now, I will bug my mom this weekend for one of her famous Lao dishes.

Also, who's the cute Shetland back there?

-Tina


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Thanks Tina! The wild sheltie would be Mabel, running in circles around the tree! LOL


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Spedigrees, the photo of my vegetable bed is the bed that had peppers with string beans behind them and onions behind those. The string beans are ready to harvest. But I’m in similar position with having had little sun and my tomatoes and peppers are way behind where they normally would be by now, with the exception of one paste tomato variety, ‘Principe Borghese’ which seems to be growing very well, and one pepper variety out of six, that is also just humming along, ‘Gypsy’, which already has three good size peppers on it. My first time growing both, so I haven’t tasted them yet to recommend them entirely. I’m hoping that if we finally do get some sun soon, that they will pick up speed. Even my squash plants have barely grown. I direct sowed and they had three leaves on them for a month.

Those are very pretty marigolds and I love all your creative containers! At least I can see your grass is really green from all the rain. (g)

Tina, I've been very pleased with these marigolds. I bought them as six packs in the spring and I've always had a fondness for white marigolds. These were called 'Sweet Cream' and they took off as soon as they hit the ground and have amazed me with the amount of blooms they've pushed out in a short time.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Everyone's gardens look wonderful--- lush and really weed-free. How is that possible? Here along the CT coast the weeds have won. I'm not too keen on posting "long shots" of my gardens, which are lush with weeds. It has been hot, Hot, HOT and muggy, which has mostly kept me out of the garden.

Here a few pictures. First, a long shot of one of my two lily clumps. No RLB this year! But notice all the low-growing "greenery"?

A close up of one lily. This is an unnamed extra bonus that came with a bulb order a few years back.

Here's another clump that grew from three bulbs I bought several years ago. Last year these were RLB magnets, this year they're glorious.

Closeup of these lily plants---

And following are just a few other photos.

Lysmachia 'Firecracker' that I took home from the CT GW Plant Swap. It looks great in front of the greenery of my Phlox 'David'!

A beautiful weed that I couldn't bear to pull out, tucked in among some roses, Portulaca, Oenothera 'Siskiyou'

Don't know what it's called. I named it "King of the Weeds"

Maybe it's an "old age thing", but I left quite a few funky weeds alone in the garden this year--- my specimen plants.

Molie


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

FWIW, oriental beetles and asian beetles are two different (but some would say equally devilish) scoundrels. Unfortunately, I am all too intimately familiar with the orientals, which are the bane of my daisies, echinacea, and to a lesser extent, daylilies. Only lesser on the daylilies because they bloom only for the day, and for some reason for which I am thankful, the orientals only go after the opened blooms, not the buds, on this plant. I rank orientals up with voles, I detest them so much and they cause so much damage in my garden.

Molie, I'm loving your portulaca! I was just mentioning on another thread somewhere that I need to throw some seeds down this year, as my reseeders seem to have pooped out and I only see a few new plants. And your lilies are gorgeous - so pristine! I'm still dealing with the RLL beetle, although damage doesn't seem to be as severe this year. Of course, now I have something eating my lilies and daylilies, so that's new. Just ate the buds off all the plants! Honestly, I'd rather have beetle--chewed lilies than none at all!

Just drove home in a drenching downpour, complete with thunder, lightening, and downed trees across roads. But so glad it finally rained!

Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Molie, your lilies are very pretty and I love photo #3 with such a gorgeous backdrop behind them! You must love getting to look at that scenery every day. My lilies just started opening too and they look a lot like yours. I have 'Orania'.

I can't tell the difference between the oriental and the asian beetles, but they have showed up here and I'm seeing sudden damage on echinaceas and something is eating the lily petals. Thankfully, I don't get a huge population at this point, but I need to get out there and reduce the numbers so they don't get a foothold.

No rain here all day, just gray.

There's a little brown beetle in one of the 'Julia Child' roses.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Not all the way open yet....


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Gee, Prairiemoon --- your lilies DO look like mine. I'll have to look 'Orania' up and see if that's what I have. Mine were planted many years ago, long before I thought of tagging what I have. I love your Julia Child Rose; in what kind of conditions is she growing? I had a beautiful yellow rose that I lost and would love to replace. Flooding + winds = tough conditions for some rose plants though my Queen Elizabeth Rose has never suffered from salt water flooding. She's one tough plant-----here she is just a few days ago. She always comes back for me.

Dee, the rain you drove home in just missed us, sadly. The gardens could use it. Hopefully we'll get rain next week.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

To the left of the walk into the kitchen door Annabelle has started her long riot of bloom. This fall I'll whack her back since I didn't realize how much she suckers when I planted her and she is overwhelming some of the nearby plants.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

To the right of the same entry walk is a rather overgrown cottage garden. We've had so much rain that I haven't been able to get in there to trim back the roses or anything else. This is the first year the hollyhocks haven't been destroyed by rust, so I am enjoying their dark red blooms.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Babs, I have 'Annabelle' in my front foundation and I've been resisting giving it support and it is just a mess right now. I'm considering replacing it with 'Incrediball' which is supposed to stay upright without support. Do you have support under yours?

Molie, I've always liked that 'Queen Elizabeth' rose. I always hear good things about it. Very pretty!

I am happiest with 'Julia Child' than the other four roses I have. It is a real performer, and pushes out a lot of blooms. They are a medium to small size, which you can't tell from the photo. But they are that beautiful butter color, which I understand is why they named it after Julia Child because she was so in love with butter. (g)

I grow organically, so any rose has to be pretty disease resistant, which this seems to be. I do still get the usual rose insects and have to deal with those by hand picking, but after I trim it back after the first flush of bloom, the foliage comes in very clean. It is growing in loamy clay in a bed that is slightly bermed and in full sun.

Here is a little better photo of it from last year.....

This post was edited by prairiemoon2 on Tue, Jul 9, 13 at 20:35


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

I've got two clematis that are climbing into opposite sides of this Hydrangea paniculata. I think this is the most successful shrub I've tried to grow clematis into due to its stiff, relatively short branches that go to the ground and so provide a great ladder for the clematis to climb.

Little Bas is in its third year.

From clematis on hydrangea July 9, 2013

It was too wet to rummage around for the tag of this one, but it was planted last season and is already reaching into the hydrangea.

From clematis on hydrangea July 9, 2013

I like the clematis with longer length of stem between the leaves for growing into shrubs since they don't overwhelm the shrub and allow both plants to shine.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Which hydrangea paniculata is that Babs? Very pretty!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

PM2 - I like Julia C's color and nice to know that she doesn't require fussing to keep looking nice. She'll most likely be hardy for me, and best of all, I read that she's scented! I think I need to find a spot for her.

I think that H. paniculata is 'Pink Diamond', though it might be 'Quick Fire'. I'll see if I can find a tag.

My 'Annabelle' is wedged between two other shrubs, a spirea and a huge rhodie, so doesn't have a whole lot of flopping opportunity. She does flop a bit forward. I have read in one of the forums that the hype about the strong stems of 'Incrediball' are just that, hype. The extra size/weight of the flowers more than counteracts any stem strength and it flops at least as much as 'Annabelle'. I think if I were worried about flopping, I'd probably put several bamboo stakes around her and a ring of string, early enough in the season so that the leaves and blossoms would cover the support. Alternatively, if you have a slope or wall, her flopping becomes an asset as she drapes gracefully over the top. However, I don't find that she ever actually lands on the ground, and the long profusion of blooms more than justifies her presence in the garden. I often cut some stems for booth decoration at a craft fair we go to in August, and always get asked about what the plant is. The other thing I like about having her here is that it's a site that's hard on woody plants, between the voles eating the winter bark under the snow and snow load getting raked off the roof onto garden, and so I need plants that don't mind being cut to the ground after a difficult winter. 'Annabelle' takes to that without blinking, so for me it's a perfect plant for the spot.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Babs, yes, I forgot to add, that JC is scented. I would not say it is strongly scented but noticeably so. To me a rose without fragrance is just not worth the real estate, because that is at least 60% of what I love about it.

I have a feeling your Hydrangea is 'Quick Fire' because I have 'Pink Diamond' and it is just starting to develop buds and won't be ready to bloom for awhile, and I am in zone 6. I'm captivated by your combination. I have a trellis growing behind 'Pink Diamond' with Clematis on it but they have already gone by. I may get a new one and train it into the Hydrangea for a later bloom too. The whole area is meant to be a screen and is still filling in, but the more the merrier.

'Annabelle' is definitely on the ground for me three years in a row. I inserted black milk crates under the branches for support, after the fact, but next year I am going to have to use something more. Especially if 'Incrediball' is not going to work out. I have tried pruning it all the way to the ground, twice, but this year I just cut off the dead flower heads and it still did the same thing.

Thanks for that information. I do enjoy the plant and will figure out something.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Babs, your clematis against the hydrangea paniculata (that variety and the lace caps are my favorites) are both striking. I love the way you've let both do their own thing and weave through the hydrangea. Do you ever prune them?

PM2, thanks for the second photo of Julia C. I've only seen that rose in catalogues and was always suspicious of the color shown, but she is truly buttery. I don't mind the smaller size blossom as long as the color shows well, and yours certainly does!

Molie


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by lalala 6 (Metro Boston) (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 10, 13 at 10:57

Prairiemoon, my best trick for keeping Annabelle from flopping is a peony cage for the inner stems, plus stakes/string (actually that garden wire with rubber around it) for the outer stems. Works great and is invisible.

Babs and Prairiemoon, my Annabelle is 3 years old and I've never cut it back. I know keeping it unpruned is supposed to improve stem strength, but what are the benefits to cutting it back? Does that keep it smaller/prevent suckering? Make a nicer, more rounded shape? Create larger blooms?

Thanks!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Lalala, thanks for that suggestion. I would not have thought of putting something for the inner stems and the outer stems. Sounds like a plan. And the reason for pruning it back? I'm not sure it makes a lot of difference. I end up pruning mine all the way back because without support the stems usually bend and break and need to be pruned off the next season to start fresh. It did still sucker. I'll try to find a photo from the years I pruned it to compare and get back to you.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

PM2 and Molie, I am envying you your lilies. I had planted several each of about 5 kinds over the last three years, all oriental-trumpet hybrids, and the voles ate every single one last winter. Last year was my worst ever for the voles and they have continued into the summer.

Lalala, I only prune Annabelle back when the stems are damaged by voles or heavy winter snow (usually when we have to rake the roof in the years we get more than 4'); some years she ends up a tangled mess of broken branches. It doesn't stop suckering, but in the years I prune there are fewer flower heads but they tend to be close to volleyball sized. I am just as happy having more smaller ones.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Babs, this is my second year with the lilies and they are super fragrant too. I do see I still have a few RLLBeetles that I missed and if it weren't for those buggers, I'd plant a whole lot more lilies. It is time consuming to keep after them. Do you get RLLBs? If not, and the voles are the issue, I wonder if you couldn't plant them in hardware cloth boxes that you put together? I think it would really be worth it.

Voles and moles, there must be some predator for them? What about a friend who might have a terrier you could borrow? (g) Isn't that what they were bred for? OH, except I guess they would dig up your garden. Nope, that's not going to work.

You have posted so many beautiful photos of your garden recently, that you must be keeping ahead of them. Glad they are not destroying everything.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

I had said I would post a photo when my Gardenia "Frostproof" bloomed, and it did today. I had to take the photo with my phone, so not the best, but I was on my way in from the market and it was starting to rain, so it was that or nothing. I will try to get out and get photos of more of the garden, but it has not been a great time for me the past five or six weeks.

Anyway, I hope you like it. This one has the true Gardenia fragrance!

 photo GardeniaE_zps90e2702a.jpg

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Molie, if your garden is "lush with weeds" I sure can't see them! That is beautiful, as is your cottage garden, NHBabs. I'm loving everyone's lilies, but still have a full day of weeding ahead of me to uncover my own singular lily. If the rain will ever stop...

I have squashed my first two Japanese beetles and I hope they are not the forerunners of a swarm similar to last year's. My vegetable patch looks pitiful enough from lack of sun. I planted a second crop of summer squash and I think those seeds, too, have rotted in the ground and will never show their heads.

The only things loving this rain seem to be daylilies. My old fashioned orange daylilies are blooming, along with this red variety, whose name escapes me. They are a brighter red, but the colors were muted by condensation on the lens.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Two other pictures are my hen and chicks whose central stalk has now also risen and given birth to a cluster of tiny pink flowers. It was impossible to capture in a photo, but these teensy blooms look like a mirror image in miniature of the pink cosmo and pink poppy blooms to the left of where this pot of succulents sits, in the same garden.

The second photo is my bee balm which never ceases to amaze me, considering that it came to me a few years ago as a single stalk, accidentally included in the pot with a phlox plant of the same color. The phlox is doing well, but the monarda has its sights set on world domination (which is fine with me)!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

PM2, you must be slightly ahead of me. My Oranias are JUST about to open, maybe tomorrow morning. Molie's lilies brought Orania to mind for me as well, but on second look I thought they were a tad too yellow. But they are gorgeous!

As is your Julia Child, PM2. I've been toying with this one for awhile. Roses don't seem to do all that well in my garden. They start off good, but I think they don't like my neglect. I just noticed yesterday that a small climber I have does not have a single leaf on it! Completely naked!

By the way, asiatic beetles are small and copper-colored. I usually only see them at night and they seem much more stationary. Orientals are bigger, kind of beige with brown markings, are around all day every day, and fly around a lot more, often getting stuck in one's hair. Yuck. Sorry, I know I seem to be harping on these things lately, but I am positively infested with them (half a dozen in each bloom!) and I'm so sick of their damage and can't seem to find a solution. LOL, maybe I should go post this on the complaint thread!

:)
Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Hi Bill, Thanks for posting photos of your ‘Frostproof’. Did you just add that this spring or did you have it over the winter? I can only imagine how fragrant it is! I had wondered where you’d been lately, sorry to hear you haven’t had a good month. Hope you have not been sick?

Spedigrees, Pretty Bee Balm. I have mine growing in full sun and I’ve been thinking it might like a little less. Yours looks to be in full sun too and looks like it’s growing great.

Dee, surprising if your Oranias are behind mine, since you are south of me in CT. Mine are in all day sun, are yours?

Julia Child is a performer as far as roses go, but she is still a rose. (g) I think she can handle a little neglect and still do fairly well, but with just a little bit of well timed attention, she does great. I don’t do that much, but I do more than with other plants. I fertilize in the spring, do bug searches before they strip my leaves early on before they bloom and hand pick, or if I forget, then I have a mess of eaten leaves that have to be trimmed off to make room for new clean foliage and I deadhead. That is about all I do. I prune them back to a good framework in the spring too. Oh and I spray fish/seaweed emulsion on them when I think of it.

Dee, are you able to just hand pick the beetles? Put on some headphones and listen to your favorite music and carry around a container with soapy water in it and just knock them into it. If you have that many, maybe a 5 gallon bucket would be right. I use ours for so many things in the garden. Do that every day or a couple of times a day for a week and that will really reduce their numbers.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

PM2, I barely have time to just literally walk through the garden once a day (if I'm lucky lately I've gotten out for a quick once-thru three times a week) and it would be a full-time job to get every beetle. I do literally have at least three beetles in almost every bloom in my garden. This is not an exaggeration. They usually seem to go for the daises, echs, and daylilies, but this year they are in the lily blooms, the rudbeckias, and even the hydrangea and hosta blooms. And in my hair and even crawling on my neck while I'm driving in my car! I guess one of them wanted to come for a ride with me, lol.

I've decided this year that I really have no business having a garden. I just don't have time for it. God only knows how I did it the last few years when I has that fourth job, lol!

By the way, I saw my first open Orania bloom today, it struck me as surprisingly small. I seem to remember them being much bigger blooms, and then I also noted that the plants themselves seemed shorter than usual. Hmm, I'd think all the rain would make them grow well, but maybe lack of sun had just the opposite effect...?

Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Molie - I prune the clematis to near the ground each winter (one or two buds on each stem) since it's one that blooms on new wood only. I don't prune the hydrangea at all other than to remove the spent flowers some time in early spring if I have a chance.

This post was edited by nhbabs on Thu, Jul 11, 13 at 21:25


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Dee, well hopefully at some point, you will have the time. Maybe you will win MegaBucks. :-) With the earwigs, I think if we have a drier year next year, it would help without you doing much about it. I also have a smaller garden then you do.

I just looked up if there are predators for earwigs, and they suggest toads and birds. Also an interesting idea, chickens and ducks. Want to have fresh eggs and less earwigs? lol Now I'm sure you have time to raise chickens too Dee!!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

LOL! Actually, I have indeed considered chickens! As a matter of fact, my co-workers and I (at ONE of my jobs, lol - a non-profit that promotes organic ag and gardening) were just discussing the rather new problem of homeless chickens, and the growth of chicken sanctuaries. Seems people don't realize chickens only lay eggs for a few years, and then folks don't have the heart to slaughter the chicken for food, but don't want to keep a bunch of non-laying chickens around, and so they need to find a place for them. Hence the opening of chicken shelters. Keeping chickens certainly is a commitment!

It's not earwigs that are troubling me, PM2, but oriental beetles. Or... are you saying YOU have problems with earwigs? I don't think I would ever handpick earwigs, not if I had all the time in the world, lol! Yuck!

Mega Bucks.... I like that idea......

Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 11, 13 at 18:17

Thanks all for the compliments on my path and garden. The path kind of keeps the jungle almost under control.

Tina: What a lovely found daylily! Are you going to move the others into the sun too?

Lovely true lilies, PM2 and Molie. None of mine have flowered yet.

Very pretty hydrangea/clematis combination, nhbabs.

Homeless chickens and chicken sanctuaries, Dee? Oh great, keeping chickens is such a hot new trend and the reality has just sunk in. Farming is not for the faint of heart.

More daylilies here:

Joan Senior with meadow phlox.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

American Revolution with meadow phlox.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

and hostas:

Paul's Glory in bloom in between variegated Solomon's Seal and good old variegated hosta Undulata.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Blue Angel hosta next to Blue Billow hydrangea with some meadow phlox. The itea are gone by.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

and on my deck,

Clivia 'Golden Dragon' is blooming in July as usual, not in the winter.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The clivia is joined by Christmas Fantasy "Christmas cactus". Fourth of July cactus? Another "Christmas cactus" is about to bloom too
Image and video hosting by TinyPic.

I think they're trying to tell me that the winter conditions in my house are not acceptable for blooming houseplants.

Claire


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Chicken Shelters?! Now I have heard everything. But completely understandable, because I could never kill a chicken either. I didn’t know they didn’t lay eggs after a few years. On the other hand, isn’t there anyone who wants a few chickens to have for dinner, instead of sheltering them? Such a dilemma, who knew? (g)

I just looked up whether chickens eat oriental beetles and evidently they do and they eat Red Lily Leaf Beetles and Japanese Beetles too. I assume the beetles would have to be on the ground though? Some people catch them then feed them to the chickens and how is that a help?

Earwigs, was the discussion on the Perennial Forum today, but I did mean the Asian beetles…. and chickens eat both. Sorry about that!

And no, would not handpick an earwig, but a paper cup of soapy water, held under a leaf they are on, and flick them in or shake them off the plant into the cup works great, without touching them.

Claire, I LOVE the color of that American Revolution Day lily! And that area with the Blue Billow is really pretty. I thought Clivia were difficult to get to bloom at any time of the year, so I think you are doing well.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Ooh, Claire, that American Revolution is wonderful! I never cared much for red, except for the stunning red of lobelia cardinalis, but I'm coming round! I bought a Chicago Apache on a total impulse - at the supermarket of all places! Was walking through the lot to go in and they had plants along the front of the store, and I fell in love with the Chicago Apache. And so it begins....

:)
Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Everyone's gardens are looking great at this time of year. Claire's in particular. I too am fighting Oriental Beetles which are more active at night and thus are hard to catch. Thus far they have eaten my roses, echinacea, clematis and even the new growth on a young Cercis canadensis Forest Pansy. URI entomology recommends killing grubs, but I won't use imidacloprid which is implicated in honeybee colony collapse. The alternative is "Catch Can" traps. I think I'm going to give these a try. Link below.

Still there are a few photo worthy plants blooming. Here they are:

Hydrangea with H. montana Aureomarginata
Hydrangea with H. montana Aureomarginata photo DSC02377_zps4d75f9b8.jpg

Purple Cone flower with a visitor. I'm sure someone will know what variety it is.
Echinacea photo DSC02376_zps2a2caee2.jpg

Black eyed Susan self seeded
Rudbeckia photo DSC02357_zps9d30b0c7.jpg

Annabelle
Annabelle photo DSC02356_zpsea0c92c7.jpg

Sea Holly (winter sowed) with Bella Anna (pink version of Annabelle)
Sea Holly & Bella Anna photo DSC02311_zpsfb4a31fe.jpg

Hosta flowers are so underrated. This is the inflorescence of H. Cracker Crumbs
H. Cracker Crumbs inflorescence photo DSC02339_zps538df6cf.jpg

Hemerocallis Ruffled Apricot - the Oriental Beetles were having a team meeting in this bloom about 7:30 p.m. so I removed the bloom and squished about a dozen of them.
Ruffled Apricot photo DSC02308_zpsf03d9f0c.jpg

Mary Chastain was probably the greatest dabber of pollen in the Hosta world. Her hybrids all bear the prefix Lakeside. If you see a Lakeside Hosta for sale, likely its a good one. This is Lakeside Prophecy.
LS Prophecy photo DSC02320_zps62003e13.jpg

Echinacea Sunset and Geranium Rosanne
Echinacea Sunset & Geranium Roseanne photo DSC02305_zps4392335a.jpg

Can't remember the name of this Rudbeckia
Rudbeckia photo DSC02307_zps410d6766.jpg

Hemerocallis Stephanie Returns
Stephanie Returns photo DSC02301_zps2e878769.jpg

Hydrangea Twist N Shout. This is the first time I have seen honeybees in my garden in many a year. They prefer these flat topped flowers like Lace Cap Hydrangea and Asclepias, but now they are on everything.
Twist N Shout photo DSC02277_zps496ea071.jpg

Steve

Here is a link that might be useful: URI - Oriental Beetle control


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Ann,

The Gardenia has been in the ground since 2009, but I had to move it in 2011. Other than it's first year it has no protection. It has about 6 flowers now and maybe another 6 buds right now. Fragrance is the real gardenia fragrance that we all know.

Although I do have some health issues, it was my brother, in hospital for about a month and so I was going back and forth and all that one does for a brother. He passed away on June 21st, and I really never expected any of it. But slowly getting back to normal. Now if the heat will let up, I may be able to catch up on some gardening chores.

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Bill, I'm so sorry about your brother. That sounds like such a shock. I guess many of us are at the age, where things can change so quickly. I'm sure you are glad you were able to spend that last month with him and do what you could for him. He appreciated it, too, I'm sure.

I think this weekend the heat is supposed to let up and maybe getting out in the garden will help. Take care.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

My sympathy, Bill.

I always appreciate your postings of zone-pushing plants, though I haven't a hope of growing any of them myself, and I wish the internet could convey scents along with the images.

It looks like this is generally a good month for day lilies, true lilies, and hydrangeas. I am enjoying looking at all the lush looking plants and vibrant colors, and I haven't noticed any weeds, which is amazing considering the weather.

And since there have been several comments on beetles, nematodes can be used to reduce populations while they are still grubs. They are most effective on smaller grubs and they need to have moisture to move, so best success (according to some research I read) is when the area is watered daily for the first two weeks after spreading. Unlike Milky Spore, the nematodes will work on a variety of grubs, not just Japanese beetles.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Bill, so sorry to hear about your brother. My condolences.

PM2, sorry, I was typing while you posted above. Never realized chickens ate such a variety of beetles, lol. Too bad they couldn't be trained to seek and destroy. :)

Steve, great photos. Love, love, love the buds on that Cracker Crumbs! By the way, just last night I happened to read that exact article you linked to. It seemed to be more concerned with lawns and the damage the grubs do than the actual beetles and the damage they do to blooms. And honestly, I don't believe (almost) any article on oriental beetles unless there's a photo, since they seem to confuse or at least use the term loosely to mean orientals, asiatic, and Japanese.

Oh, and your Anna Bella is quite nice. I had considered this hydrangea, but the color in photos never quite appealed to me, and I have yet to see one in bloom at a garden center. I like the color that yours looks to be more than the photos I've seen on-line. And your rudbeckia might be an Irish Eyes - I always get this mixed up with Prairie Sun, which I think has more rounded petals.

Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Geez, sorry Steve. I just realized it sounded like I was bashing the link you provided, and by extension your attempt to help, and that was not my intention at all. I apologize if it came off that way.

What I meant and did not express clearly is that my general observation is that in my search for a solution to (specifically) oriental beetles, I've found both an emphasis on lawn damage by grubs, and also the loose references to all three types of beetles under the name "oriental". I was not picking on your particular article.

I hope I've removed my foot from my mouth and not shoved it further in!

:)
Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Thank you all for your words of sympathy.

I do like to push the zones, for sure, although for me, that gardenia 'Frostproof' is sold as hardy to zone 6 so technically not really a push. The past several winters have been zone 7, since I've seen no temps below zero for several years right here. I do consider trying my windmill palm as zone 6 as pushing though.........but it was planted out in the ground in spring of 2012, so it spent its first winter outdoors, and it's pushed out 4 new leaves already, and that's more than it ever did in a pot and wintered indoors.

Nice to have all the tried and true garden treasures, but nice to mix in a surprise here and there too! Keeps it interesting.

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Amazing photos of Lilies, Pixie, PM2, and Molie. And your roses are beautiful Claire and PM2! I don't grow either but appreciate them in others' gardens. Somehow roses just seemed too fussy and the lily leaf beetle has put a damper on them.

Lots of nice hydrangea pictures. The blue hydrangeas are quite beautiful and it's nice to see the bees like them too.

Tina, I think the earwigs are probably eating your Echinacea. They are all over mine! Go out with flashlight about 11 PM and check, my guess would be either earwigs or beetles.

Spedigrees do you know which Monarda that is? It's a nice lavender color.

Steve your butterfly is a great spangled fritillary and I think the Rudbeckia is 'Prairie Sun'.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Bill, I didn't find a 'Frostproof' Gardenia in the spring and bought non hardy varieties for pots instead. They had buds already when I bought them and bloomed once and now another round of blooms are getting ready to open. I'm sure I will never keep them alive over the winter though, so I'll make another try to find 'Frostproof'. I could probably order it from Logee's, I just haven't made a mail order this year, so far.

Steve, that Hosta ‘Cracker Crumbs’ bloom is a delight. Such unusual coloring. and a fat flower bud. That is a mini Hosta, right? Also wonder about Bella Anna, is that pink regardless of your soil PH?

Glad everyone is enjoying the lily photos. Wish there was an ‘ap’ for adding fragrance to the photos. :-) Terrene, you are right, roses and lilies definitely need a little more of your time. You have a lot of natives though, right?

That fritillary butterfly is so pretty. I haven’t seen one of those in the garden. I’ve been seeing a few monarchs on the echinacea this past week. Not as many numbers as other years, but maybe it’s early?

Gee, with all this talk of earwigs, I hate to go out and see if I have a lot of damage from them. I haven’t been checking things out this week. Between that and the beetles, I guess I better get out there.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 12, 13 at 7:01

It's sad to hear that you lost your brother, Bill. Working in your beautiful garden should help you adjust, and maybe you'll add a special plant in his memory.

Steve: I agree that hosta flowers are underrated. The hummingbirds and I always look forward to them and there's a long succession of bloom with pretty colors and sometimes fragrance.

Claire

This post was edited by claire on Fri, Jul 12, 13 at 7:06


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Thanks Claire. I have been doing some gardening again, although some cooler weather would help.

Ann, Dave's Garden website lists 8 vendors for "Frostproof". Fry Road nursery in Oregon has a 1 gal. for about $30 including shipping. Almost Eden in Louisiana shows a smaller size for only $9.99, but I didn't check the shipping. Logee's has it, but they are usually pretty high on prices for quite small plants.

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Thanks Bill, that gives me some choices! :-) I have to remember to check Dave's Garden once in awhile, too.

It's nice and cool here today. Expecting it to be tomorrow too at least, but then back into the heat and humidity. If we would just at least get some sun with all that heat, my tomatoes would grow. It's not going to be a good year for tomatoes and peppers.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

I'm very sorry to hear about your brother, Bill. That is sad.

Chicken shelters? I thought seriously about getting a few hens after our old pony died, and converting the little barn into a chicken coop. I wouldn't care so much if they laid eggs, and I can't kill any animal that I've had a relationship with, so meat would also be out. But I would like them around, and they are fantastic predators of all sorts of insects. They will even eat frogs and mice when they can catch them.

The deal breakers are their longevity and never being able to go away. You can board a cat, dog, or horse, but not a chicken! Apparently chickens can live to be 20 and beyond, and I want to be sure not to leave any pets homeless when I go. I already have a 10 yr old pigeon that I expect to be with me for the next ten years. So the chicken fantasy will just remain one of those unrealized dreams.

The Japanese beetles are back this year with a vengeance. They were completely covering the leaves of my stunted sunflowers yesterday. I wish I could unleash a flock of chickens upon them!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

I only planted a single cherry tomato plant, some basil and some parsley. Returns from last year are tarragon and chives. Actually I had a large clump of chives but I had to move them and they're getting established again. I have armloads of rosemary though. Third year for R. "Barbecue", which had loads of blossoms earlier this season. The other one is R. "Arp" and it's in its fifth year. They only damage to either of them was from heavy snow loads that flattened them a bit, and broke a couple of the branches. They are both over two feet high and three feet or so across. I grow it as much for decorative reasons as well as for culinary use.

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

The rudbeckia is prairie sun. My favorite :)


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Well, for once I have some photos to post! Borrowed my husband's phone to get some shots of my non-blooming monarda for another thread, and decided to take a few pics of other things. No long or wide shots here - my garden is too messy for that!

First off, a daylily that survived the deer! I can't remember the name but I love this unusual color, which is unusual in itself because this isn't a color I would normally like!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden

Thanks to Marty for my beautiful new Quickfire hydrangea, still living in a pot, with a few balloon flower blooms in the background.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread

Some volunteer reseeders in a bed I haven't finished redoing yet - ignore the weeds!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - July 2013

My Prezioso hydrangea, from George a few years ago. It has really taken off this year (about 3' x 3') and unfortunately the variegated color of the blooms doesn't really come across.

I'm struck this year how on one hand my hydrangeas have done very well, but the blooms on them seem smaller than usual. Almost like with all the rain they grew too fast and bloomed before they were quite ready!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

And lastly, the widest shot I took, showing another surviving daylily with a (I think) rudbeckia. Or it might be echinacea Henry Ellers, but I don't think so....I think he is spikier and perhaps later... I'm having a terrible time with names this season! Also some dying feverfew, and you can see that damn sassafras poking up. That stuff is taking over my yard!

This is my new yellow/orange/red bed, which seems to be rather distressingly yellow so far, lol. I have to work more on coordinating my bloom times!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Molie, the no name lily's color is very nice. The Oenothera 'Siskiyou' smells so good. The one I got from you during the spring swap quadruple in size and smelled wonderful until some critter pulled it under ground. I found part of it sticking out of a hole.

nhbabs, the clematis and the hydrangea do really complement each other.

Dee, thanks on the names of the beetles. The Oriental ones are decimating my plants. I think I'll go complain in the "What can we complain about..." later. As for the chickens, I would give them homes but my dog would chase and eat them all. All my animals, past and present, are rescues. I do volunteer work by training dogs so they will be more adoptable. I'll have to wait until I have an animal friendly dog.

Bill, my condolence. My sisters and I see each other at least once a week. I couldn't imagine them not being there.

Your gardenia is BEAUTIFUL. How does it smell? I went to Logee's a couple of weeks ago to get one. I bought a small one in the 21/2 in pot. I didn't think to ask if they had bigger ones in the 'other' greenhouse. I was too excited. It's going to be years before this one bloom. I'm dying just thinking about it. I'm so envious of your blooms. Truthfully, part of the reason I bought one is because of your earlier posts on the 'Frost proof'.

Claire, I am definitely moving some more of the dayliles to that sunny spot. And, I'm going to sound light a jealous kindergartner....hey, why is your cacti blooming now? mine aren't. ;-)

Steve, your echinacea looks good. My leaves and petals are gone on most of them. In fact, my echinacea looks like globe thistle....but, not as nice as yours. I second terrene' s naming of the 'Prairie Sun'. You don't know how many nurseries I visited looking for those with the green eyes.

terrene, I went out two nights ago with a flash light and beetles started to dive bomb me. Well, they were attracted to the light and flew toward me. That's all it took for me to do the heebie jeebies dance and run back into the house trying not to scream bloody murder. I have a phobia with certain beetles and bugs that remind me of roaches. I lived on my own in high school and rented an inner city project apartment....need I say anything else?

-Tina


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Dee

No worries about your review of the URI article. I was a bit put off by the lawn/imidocloprid thing myself. Usually the URI entomology articles are quite good, but that one wasn't. I did however, find a link through that article to Arbico Organics that sells a variety of different kinds of beneficial nematodes. I've been looking for Steinernema Carpocapse for some time. Not only does this nematode control grubs, it also is the only beneficial nem that will control foliar nematodes. Foliar nems are a real problem in Hostas and are hard to control. The link is below.

Thanks for the Prarie Sun ID. Lost the tag on that one.

H. Cracker Crumbs is a mini. I little bright gold thing.

Bella Anna is always pink, regardess of pH. The only drawback is that it flops like Annabelle does. I need to get some Peony supports for it. I bought that one for $5 at Weston Nurseries in November after the pallet sale broke up. It's grown well.

Enjoy the weekend. It's going to get hot next week. Remember, nothing lasts in the garden.

Steve

Here is a link that might be useful: Arbico Organics


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

LOL, Tina, that's why I never go in the garden at night! I always see people saying, "oh, go out with a flashlight and look for...." and I think, what, are you crazy?! LOL

:)
Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Everyone's pictures are great!

Bill, very sorry to hear about your brother. Was he a gardener like you? I'm glad you have a garden to help you through this very rough time.
Well, I picked up my first camellia this year thanks to your zone-pushing, and now I think I'll have to sign up for that gardenia after seeing your photos of it. I like that you take some risks in your garden because you're the brave guinea pig and then we all benefit!! Thanks for that!


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Thanks again to all for the kind words of sympathy.

Many of you have been interested in the gardenia, so I went out and took these today. The fragrance is definitely what we all expect from a gardenia, and G. "Frostproof" doesn't disappoint. Here is a closeup of the flower.

Closeup photo DSCF1790_zpsfb6f0d46.jpg

Here is the whole plant. Unfortunately today the open flowers were more plentiful on the backside of the plant. But there are quite a few more buds, and when they are open facing out, I'll try to get another shot. Also, excuse the few yellowed leaves. That was about the only minor setback of winter, but no more than many other traditionally hardy plants might get. I haven't had a chance to snip them. Maybe tomorrow.
Plant photo DSCF1792_zps4975687b.jpg

Photobucket


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Gosh we are a chatty bunch lately. I just posted a part II thread.

Here is a link that might be useful: July Part 2


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Dee,
That looks like heliopsis with your daylily.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 13, 13 at 11:12

Tina: "Christmas" cacti are induced to bloom by either long nights or cold weather. All winter they stay indoors next to houseplants that need all the light I can give them and can't stand much cold. So they don't bloom; they just sulk.

The clivia and cacti are the first plants to go out on the deck when there's no danger of freezing at night, days are reasonably warm, and light is much better. This makes them happy. Me too.

I've tried keeping the clivia dry all winter but it ignores it and just waits to bloom until it can go outside too.

Claire


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Steve, thanks for that link and the info on Bella Anna, and most importantly, your understanding! I didn't read through the article far enough to see the link, so thanks for that.

And capecodder, thanks for the heliopsis ID. I'll have to go back through my very disorganized records (or dig around the dirt at the base of the plant, lol) to confirm.

Dee


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Hi All,
Wonderful photos! I can hardly wait until spring bursts along next year!

Steve_mass: That is Rudbeckia, Prairie Sun---
the one with the gorgeous green eye.


 o
RE: What's Blooming in your garden - a photo thread - July 2013

Hi All,
Wonderful photos! I can hardly wait until spring bursts along next year!

Steve_mass: That is Rudbeckia, Prairie Sun---
the one with the gorgeous green eye.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the New England Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here