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Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Posted by pixie_lou 5 (My Page) on
Wed, Oct 2, 13 at 9:04

This is a place to post photos, and to discuss, what is in your garden. This is the thread for October 2013. All garden photos are welcome. As we enter autumn, the emphasis starts to shift away from blossoms and we start to think about leaves, berries, branches, etc. However, all landscape and garden photos are welcome. If it is a photo taken in your garden or your yard, it is fair game to post it here.

Here is the link for the October 2012 thread.

For previous 2013 threads:

September 2013

August 2013 part 2

August 2013 part 1

July 2013 part 2

July 2013 part 1

June 2013 part 2

June 2013 part 1

May 2013

April 2013 part 1

April 2013 Part 2

March 2013

February 2013

January 2013

To see all of the 2012 threads, please click on the December 2012 link. The first post will have links to all previous months.

I am (still) in process of moving all the 2011 threads over to the
photo gallery
. I need to look up who I�m supposed to e-mail. Plus I have to make the list. Maybe I'll get it done before 2014!

FWIW if we have 50 posts in this thread by 15 October, then I will make an October Part II thread.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I thought I might get this month off to a good start, so here are a few photos I took on October 1. Still a lot of color in the garden.

Montauk Daisy
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Prickly Pear (opuntia) fruits and Callirhoe (Poppy Mallow)
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Hesperaloe parvifolia (Red Yucca) flower detail
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Hesperaloe flower spike.
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Prickly Pear and Poppy Mallow
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Lavender
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Prickly Pear and Poppy Mallow
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Coleus
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Nest three are general views. Knockout rose, Crape Myrtle "Pink Velour", Potentilla "Goldfinger"
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Golden Japanese Forest Grass
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Next two are Knockout Rose
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Next two are fruits of Dogwood - Cornus"Cherokee Princess"
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Albizzia julibrissn ("Mimosa") and boulder garden yucca.
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Black-Eyed Susan Vine
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Million Bells (Calibrachoa)
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Osteospermum
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Black-Eyed susan flower.
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This post was edited by bill_ri_z6b on Wed, Oct 2, 13 at 18:14


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 2, 13 at 17:07

Beautiful, Bill, but we need identification!

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Claire, I have edited my post with names of plants.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 2, 13 at 19:16

Thanks! I guessed a few but not enough.

I have opuntia and hesperaloe envy - I just don't have a reasonable site to make them happy. The wet soggy winters would probably be the final straw. Your opuntia looks absolutely joyful with all its fruits.

I also like the way you've used the Knockout rose as a standalone plant. It seems to fit in the more Xeric type landscape just as well as it would in a cottage garden. Boulders suit it.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Wow, BIll, your garden is so neat. And I do mean neat, lol, as in tidy and orderly. Mine is such a mess.

I realized when I saw your Montauk daisy that I don't think I have any buds on mine this year! I'm going to have to go take a closer look. My poor garden has been so neglected this year. I don't even know what's going on out there (except that everything is crying out for a good watering!)

Dee


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Dee, thanks. That upper garden (with the paved paths and mulch) is still quite new and a work in progress. I want to add more things as time goes on, but I also want to see how the things that are planted develop as they mature.

Claire, that red yucca has been in bloom since May! This year it had 5 flower spikes which are about 4 feet tall and sway in the breeze, and they just keep growing more flowering stems from those 5. And the seed pods look like little fat birds perched on them. I think you could grow one if you have a spot in full sun. All you need to do is to slightly raise the soil and plant it at the top of the mound (and by mound, I don't mean Everest.....just a subtle rise in level maybe 8 inches in a 5 foot in diameter mound). Then, if you mulch with stone (as I did in my front xeric garden) you can even hide the mound in the soil by making the stone level. Water will easily drain through the stone, and then away from the center of the mound (and the plant of course). The stone mulch keeps things neat and dry, and even holds a bit of warmth. Same would work for the prickly pear. The one I posted in the photo is a very large one, with pads about 10 inches long and 8 inches wide. It has beautiful, large yellow blooms around June and into July. The fruits are 4-5 inches long.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Hi Bill, Nice to see how your garden has done this year. I agree with Dee, so very clean and well cared for! I can’t believe how much lavender blooms you have for October. I see your line of Arborvitae and I can just imagine how much privacy that is going to continue to provide as they mature. They’re pretty tall already. And your trees are looking good too. Another couple of years they should really start taking off. Isn’t it hard to wait for plants to mature? (g) I have felt many a twinge of impatience, but at the same time, I’m always very distracted by other plans to make changes in the garden, that all of a sudden time has gone by and suddenly they are really on their way.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Hi Ann, I was looking at some photos of the same upper garden areas from two years ago, and it's amazing how much bigger most things are now! The dogwoods and flowering cherry have doubled, and the roses are three or four times bigger. The grasses have matured too. I still want to add more things, so that there aren't as many ugly, empty spaces of mulch, but over time it will be nice to browse nurseries and find something that I really want to have. And then I'll know that there's a spot for it. How many times have we all seen a "must have" plant, but realized that we just didn't have a place for it?

The lavender self seeds a lot, and the younger plants bloom later as they mature.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

It's really nice to have photos so we can see the difference from one year to the next. It is really amazing! lol You are in a lucky position to have all that empty space, Bill. I just came in the house from digging out yet another plant that has to go. I've been doing it all week. It is a lot of work creating the space when you don't have it. Taking your time to choose just the right plant that you will love for a long time, is a good plan. Sounds like you have a lot of fun to look forward to. :-)


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 3, 13 at 16:31

Bill: I just don't have much in the way of full sun areas for a plant that needs it. The closest thing to full sun is in an area near the driveway that occasionally gets driven or parked on - not a good place for a plant to live. It's also close to a woodchuck burrough - also a drawback.

I'll just have to admire your hesperaloe and opuntia when you post photos.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Claire, I'd have to research the sun requirements for Hesperaloe, but the opuntia family is fairly adaptive. I've had many of them flourish and bloom in half day sun and half day shade. In fact, in my travels out west, on the higher plateaus in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada and Utah, I often see them blooming beautifully in a grassy meadow under high pines. True that they're not in dense shade, but it's definitely not full blazing sun all day. They're not expensive plants, so maybe you could try one next year. If there were a swap, or even by mail, I could easily send you pads which you merely lay on the soil and they make a plant.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 3, 13 at 18:29

Bill: I just did a quick search for 'opuntia in New England' and found out that there's an Eastern Prickly Pear (Opuntia humifusa) that's native to Massachusetts, although extremely rare. I also looked in William Cullina's NEWFS Native Wildflowers book.

This really interests me since I like to grow locally native plants, although not exclusively.

He talks about the glochids, the nasty little spines that make prickly pears prickly. Is this a problem for you?

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 3, 13 at 19:54

Bill (and others): You might enjoy this site Tales From The Ranch: more Opuntia tales about the history of opuntia in this country and all sorts of interesting information.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Claire, I will read that as soon as I have time. Thanks!

Meanwhile, the eastern prickly pear (O. humifusa) is one of the ones I grow, and have grown for over forty years. It thrives with virtually no pests or problems, and no care really. Pieces will occasionally break off, and, voila!, a new plant! Covered with yellow flowers in June and reddish-purple fruits in fall. But there are others (I have two others) that thrive as well. One is the one in the photos here, and another is O. englemanii, which has bigger pads than the native O. humifusa, but not as big as the other (whose name I don't know). I think you'd be able to grow one or more of them if you'd like to try.

As for the glochids (the small spines in little clusters patterned all over the pads), they do make it imperative that you don't touch the plants. Gloves aren't really effective, since the spines can penetrate the fabric, but even if they don't penetrate, they will embed themselves in the gloves, and the when you handle the gloves...........well you get the "point"! But I use tongs when I have to handle a broken pad, or pull a weed out, etc. so not a problem. Just look but don't touch.....and enjoy!

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Oct 4, 13 at 10:16

Bill: I need to rethink this. The one place where I can get reasonable sun is also periodically overrun by the young dog next door. He's a very enthusiastic type that loves to jump all over everything, and I don't think the neighbors would appreciate him getting spines in his feet.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I think he would only run into a cactus ONCE! LOL!

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I with Bill on that one, lol!

Not to mention, IMO, if the neighbors don't want THEIR dog getting spines from YOUR cactus in his paws, they should restrain THEIR dog, and you should grow what you want in YOUR garden!

Just give them fair warning so the pooch doesn't get hurt. Wouldn't want him to run into that even one time...

:)
Dee


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Bill, your garden is spectacular. Looking at these beautiful pictures I would think that I had accidentally stumbled upon the Arizona gardening Forum.

We are at peak color-fest here in Vermont. Apparently the two earlier mild frosts that we had were enough to bring out the red shades in the foliage. Here are a couple photos of our land and the adjacent meadow.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

And a couple others looking down on our house and barn from our hill on the eastern part of our property.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Fri, Oct 4, 13 at 19:25

Very pretty fall foliage, spedigrees - classic Vermont. We're not there yet here in southeast Mass. and, to be honest, we don't usually get a big show.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I took a ride to Newport today and there is quite a bit of color already. I think it's going to be a good year. Last year it all just sort of stayed green quite late and then went all brown.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Yes, I'm hoping for a good year, and that's what I've been hearing forecast. My boring old oaks might even have some nice color this year. Some are starting to turn early, and they are quite a nice rusty color!

Nice pics, spedigrees! Must be lovely to look out on that landscape every day, no matter what season!

Dee


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I still have some flowers going; the Franklinia altamaha is a little past its peak:
From Fall2013Garden

I really LOVE Mexican bush sage, worth waiting for although it seems to take forever to start blooming:

From Fall2013Garden

Crape myrtles seem to have been blooming for over a month, but still look good.

From Fall2013Garden

And some of the sedums bloomed late this year:

From Fall2013Garden

Japanese anemone is another good late bloomer.

From Fall2013Garden

I think this is Lady in Red - a close relative of 'preziosa' (hydrangea serrata) that has flowers that retain a lot of color for a long time:

From Fall2013Garden

I'll see if I can fill n my picasa album, I've been kind of lazy about that this year.

Here is a link that might be useful: picasa web - fall garden 2013


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

DTD,
I really like that Franklinia! Your crape myrtles are great! Mine still has a few blooms on it, and the fall color is starting to show in the foliage. But mine is nowhere near as tall as yours. It's only on it's third season. Maybe four feet tall now?

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I have crape myrtle envy! They are so beautiful, but it's too cold for them here.

Your sedums are very pretty too, Digging. I really should plant some next year.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Love the photos of your gardens, Bill. I've been inspired by some of your plantings and have added them to my gardens. As for your stonework and the stone paths --- oh, my!

Sped, the fall color around your Vermont home brings back such wonderful memories of VT and NH, two states I lived in over 40 years ago. Last week we drove up through the Mohawk Trail with the dog -- had to see some color and it was just beginning along Rt. 2 so, of course, it has to be glorious now in Vermont. Fall has started to show Her colors here along the CT coast.

Since the end of September I've been cleaning up the gardens then suddenly with a stretch of better weather, lots of perennials filled out again. Here are a few photos from this month.

Agastache surrounding Rud. Herbstonne 'Autumn Sun'

Veronica that popped up in front of Phlox. To the right is my new 'Light the Way' daylily bought from a CT grower. Can't wait to see it next year.

A favorite 'forgot the name' Sedum

Newest sedum, 'Mr. Goodbud'

Dick Clark rose filling out again behind Etienne

Dick, up close. All my roses have perked up since the heat wave passed.

Here's Rose 'Oragold' --- a body-bag rose from HD that's thriving.

And my oldest, Queen Elizabeth. She's been with us for many years--- one tough lady.

Molie

This post was edited by mjc_molie on Sat, Oct 5, 13 at 14:03


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Sped, I'm jealous of those views - nothing like that around me!

And I'm practically drooling over Bill's lavender - I never got around to cutting mine back or even dead-heading, so all I've got left are rangy subshrubs with spent flower spikes still poking up. Not quite as pretty as yours, and there are dozens of them all over my gardens (my DH loves fragrant plants). Also, I LOVE those red yucca flowers - very unusual.

My crapes are reproducing, so if anyone wants to try one, I'll see if I can bring a couple to the spring swap. A few years ago I moved an old white one to within about 6 yards of the pink - and now there are 3 or 4 seedlings in between them. Apparently they need to be fairly close to cross-pollinate. They popped up in an area where I normally plant annual salvia, and I was too busy to do it for the past 2 years, so the ground was undisturbed there. Kept meaning to weed, and now I'm glad I didn't.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Spedigrees, you are so lucky to have such gorgeous views! I think I would find all that space and the natural beauty around me so satisfying, I might not feel I had to have a big garden. Beautiful!

DtD, I didn’t realize the Franklinia blooms so late, very nice. Your Crape Myrtle is so BIG! I am in the same boat with the lavender. (g) My DH loves fragrant plants too.

Mollie, you still have a lot blooming in your garden. I like your ‘Mr Goodbud’. It’s a pretty pink color, does it still turn rust color after the bloom fades? Your Queen Elizabeth is very pretty. I’ve thought about getting one but I haven’t yet.

We’ve been out chopping down a tree all day. Our neighbor rarely steps foot in their yard and allows it to fend for itself and Poison Ivy, Bittersweet, and many weed trees end up causing problems for us. The tree we took down today was at least 25 ft tall and was 9/10ths in our yard and I’d finally looked at it long enough. At least it was not a full canopy due to it’s dire growing conditions. Oh joy…still have a huge pile of branches to cut and tie up for the Yard Waste removal next week.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Here is the trunk leaning into our fence....


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

And the last cut before it came down. So happy to have that done!


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 6, 13 at 17:01

Lots of flowers still blooming in people's gardens!

DtD: Are any of your crape myrtles in part shade? I just bought a Hopi crape myrtle today (posted the question on an old thread) and I'm trying to decide where to put it.

Lovely roses, Molie!

I have some roses still blooming, Blushing Knockout in particular, but I'm enjoying the transition of flowers to hips in the Carefree Beauty rose.
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Most of the hips are still green but a few are turning orange.
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A volunteer aster is flowering next to the tall phlox that are almost gone by.
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Virginia Creeper is turning a good fall color. It's next to an Ilex opaca 'Goldie' which unfortunately is not going to have many yellow berries this year. It's erratic; sometimes lots of berries, sometimes just a few. I have two of them and they work in tandem - just not many flowers this year (I have a male pollinator).
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Pieris now have formed flower buds for next spring - here next to the winterberry.
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Sweet Autumn Clematis is now entering its seed head stage - not fuzzy yet:
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Hydrangea 'Blue Billow' is pretty now and it's next to an Itea which is just beginning to turn color.
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I've let a few volunteer trees grow (well, more than a few) and some of the mystery ones revealed themselves this year. Last spring some flowered and I identified them as crabapples. One of the crabapples has a few little fruits.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

And the other type which I thought was some sort of fruit tree produced an apple! The Sweet Autumn Clematis climbed up the apple tree - I'll probably remove it in the spring.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

I'm still waiting for one really late aster (Fanny) and for the cotoneaster leaves to turn color.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Hi Claire -
That aster is a beauty!

My old white crape started out in shade, actually fairly deep - but it blooms much better now that it's in more sun. Still shaded in afternoon by a giant maple, but it's in bright light until mid-afternoon. The red may be getting late afternoon shade from some willow oaks, which are getting tall (funny how that happens) but their shade is a lot lighter than the maple's.

Does SAC seed all over the place for you, or just a little? Here, it's a terrible pest; an annual chore to dig up as many as I can and try to keep the rest from setting seed. I wonder if you're in exactly the same zone, or if it's just a little milder here.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 6, 13 at 20:24

DtD: When that aster goes to seed I want to broadcast them nearby - this is the Phlox Protection Zone and the aster goes well with the tall phlox, overlapping in bloom for a little while. There are also a few similar ones down by the road and I may move one of them up as well.

It sounds like my Hopi crape myrtle may be OK in the spot I'd like to put it. Shaded in early morning then sun during midday then part shade in the afternoon, depending on how high the sun is. It might get a slow start in the spring when the sun is lower and some tall pines are blocking it.

It took a few years but SAC suddenly is producing seedlings. Maybe I just didn't notice them before but this is the first year I've seen flowers in any place other then the mother plant location. I think I'm in a slightly colder zone than you. The weather, particularly the rain/snow line, seems to change just north of the Canal (my own observation, not necessarily true). It also probably matters that I'm on the Bay with colder water than the ocean with the Gulf Stream nearby that you have.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I loved your photos, Claire. I think the reds, rusts, fading whites into cream and yellows of flowers in the fall are very appealing. They balance the changes in green leaves here in New England. To me, it signals "Go to bed!" I'm putting my gardens to sleep in preparation for the winter. Actually, as much as I love gardening, I do get a bit tired of all the weeding, trimming, etc. that I do spring, summer and early fall. I'm ready for a warm cup of tea or a nice glass of wine and a pile of garden catalogues.

Yes, my roses are still showing well even though some of the leaves are ratty. Here are a few photos I took today when I was out in the yard checking out the rising river (we're getting a huge thunderstorm tonight).

The first one is a Weeks Rose, Double Delight. This blossom is mostly white ringed in pink, but a blossom from a few days ago had much less white. You never know with this rose.

Here are two Dick Clark roses from today ---

And to answer PM2's question about Mr. Goodbud sedum, here's the photo of him today. He has striking coloration. Old fading blossoms are deep red, the ones in flush are pink/magenta and the new buds are white. Kind of neat.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Here are some other views of the gardens today. I'm picking mostly longer shots that show how plantings relate to each other. We have a very long, west-facing back area that gets a tremendous amount of sun. At the very edge close to the river it's dry. This shot goes from the Chamaecyparis obtuse 'Special Variegated' that we moved down to the Cabaret grass.

Here's a view across the end of the garden into the drier area.

A striking deep purple/red annual Celosia appeared this summer in front of one of the Karl Foersters. It really shows up well from a distance.

Here's the river "edge" at 2:00 pm today. That dock should be off a lawn area. Our river is turning into a lake because the tide is high now :(

Molie


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Very nice Molie! That celosia is really colorful! I like the open look across the river.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Thanks, Bill. We used to have many taller things at the end --- Japanese Iris, Shastas, a huge old fashioned Aster, even an Azalea --- but these all blocked our view of the river. So now everything is low and flat except for the original ornamental grasses we planted and now we have an open view of all the river life.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I love your riverside landscape, Molie. It is lovely.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Molie, such a wonderful location where you are. Amazing view you get to borrow from and to frame your garden with. Is that salt water?

Thanks for the second photo of your Goodbud. It does have nice coloring all the way along, looks like.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

PM2, we live on a tidal river which flows to Long Island Sound. And, yes, it does influence everything we do with and put into our gardens. The river's level and flow are influenced by the tides. During the last year's tropical storm, the narrow river became a lake and had whitecaps on it!

The river is peaceful and calming. Too narrow for anything but kayaks or canoes, it doesn't get much boat traffic --- a real blessing because it's so quiet. The wildlife and bird watching are great reasons to sit on the deck.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Just took these today. I love this weather!

Penstemon "Dark Towers"
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Scutellaria ("Skullcap") volunteer
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Crape Myrtle "Pink Velour" still going strong (3 photos)
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Rosemary "Barbecue" flowering agin!
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New Guinea Impatiens, fig tree and euonymus
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Common "Geranium" (Pelargonium) seems to have a new vigor with the cooler weather
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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Bill, does the Dark Towers penstemon have that color all season or does it turn this time of year?

That photo of geraniums would convince anybody that you live along the Mediterannean!

Dee


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

LOVE that Crepe Myrtle, Bill. :-)


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Dee, I sure wish I did live along the Mediterranean! I'd move to Italy tomorrow if I could!

The penstemon does have purplish foliage all season, especially when in bloom with the pink flowers. But at this time of year it gets very red, and I really like it against the warm colors of the boulders. Here it is in bloom (with Japanese iris "Wine Cups").

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Bill, add my name to the list of "Lovers of Penstemon 'Dark Towers'"--- it really is lovely and looks so vigorous, compared to my varieties. I think I'll put it on my list for next year.

Question: Tell me about how you keep your Rosemary 'Barbecue'--- you must bring it in for the winter because it's a warm zoned plant? Rosemary happens to be one of my favorite herbs, and I love the plant indoors, though they've all died for me when I tried them.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Molie,
The penstemon really looks great with the iris. And it has nice foliage all season and even the seed pods are red now.

I have two hardy rosemary plants. One is the "Barbecue" which I posted, and the other is "Arp". Both of these plants are finishing their third growing season, and so have been in the ground since spring of 2011. They both bloom, but the "Arp" usually only once in spring, while "Barbecue" is on its third flush of flowers. The bees love it too! It was named "Barbecue", as I was told, because it grows long, strong stems that can be used as skewers, and I believe it was hybridized by the folks at "The Farmer's Daughter" nursery. They said it was exclusive when I bought it. "Arp" is about three feet tall and maybe four feet wide, and "Barbecue" is about four feet tall and wide. It really should have been tied up after last winter's crushing snow, and now it's too woody to try that. If it were upright all the way, it would be close to five feet tall now.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

So much variety among the gardens of New England!
We have had some frosts and the foliage has colored.
My driveway is through a rehabed sand and gravel yard. Here is a photo from Monday; a very cloudy day after a rain storm.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Thanks again, Bill. That's helpful information about the growth of your two rosemary plants after three years. I do like the long stems of Barbecue and the fact that it has three flushes of bloom but worry about its possible height.

With our long, but relatively narrow back yard, I'd have to select one that would fit our yard's conditions. We only plant on the right, sunnier side because the neighbors to our left have an old privet hedge that goes the length of the yard plus tall trees that also shade that side.

Glorious Monday photo of your driveway, franeli! I love the lacy look of the lighter yellows intermixed with the darker pines.

Molie

This post was edited by mjc_molie on Wed, Oct 9, 13 at 9:58


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Molie, the rosemary can easily be pruned to shape in spring. I've seen very beautifully clipped and sculpted hedges, or even topiary-like shapes, in California, Nevada and Italy, where they grow so much of it as a landscape plant. Being a native of the Mediterranean, it's also quite drought tolerant. The "Arp" tends to grow a bit lower if you're concerned about height, but really, either variety can be kept in check, and will get bushier just like most other shrubs.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

True about shaping the rosemary plant, Bill, and we certainly do have a dry area. I only wish I could plant it closer to our deck ---- love the smell of rosemary as you pass by them. I've been lobbying for a patio area at the bottom of our deck but it's not looking good :(

Molie


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Franeli, your driveway would make me very happy even to shovel it in the winter, with such a special setting. (g) All the color in the trees is like a tapestry and the evergreens make a great frame. LOVE it! Thanks for sharing!


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Molie,
If your rosemary grows the way mine has, you'll be able to pick bouquets of it and enjoy the smell of them anywhere you want.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Franeli, Molie used the right word to describe your photo - glorious! Even on a cloudy day it is just gorgeous!

Bill, that Dark Towers is really great. The first photo was so reddish, and "hot" in terms of color, but it looks just as wonderful with those beautiful irises, and so "cool". Of course, you've got that beautiful stone backdrop to those plants there in Italy! ;)

Uh, Molie, I don't understand what you mean by "don't plant on the left side.... in shade"..... please explain. ;) LOL. Seems to me you need to install a lovely, soothing, refreshing shade garden along that side of the yard!

Still trying to wrap my mind around the thought of a four-foot-tall (and wide!!) rosemary plant...

Dee


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Ann - the crape myrtle has performed well. It's nice to have a shrub flowering later in the season.

Diggerdee - the rosemary plants really take off the second and third seasons in the ground. Last winter's heavy snowstorm did flatten them a bit. I should have staked them soon after, but I didn't. Now they are too woody to try to bend up again, but they make a lot of growth and gain height anyway. "Arp" is a bit less upright, while "Barbecue" blooms more.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Dee, it's a funny story ---our neighbors on the left are wonderful people and we get along well with them. The present owner grew up in that house and he believes that his plot line swings into our back yard, claiming that his father planted those hedges along the "real" boundary line but tried "straightening them out" over the years by pruning instead of letting the hedge grow in a slanted line. He's spoken to us in the past about "removing some of our plants on his side of our yard in case we ever want to sell some day." He doesn't want any neighbors he doesn't like using his land.

So we generally just stay away from that side of the yard when gardening. We're certainly not intending to sell or wanting to get the yard surveyed to settle this verbal misunderstanding. I do have plot info from the town showing our lot in relationship to all the others --- with straight lines heading to the river and a rectangular lot rather than a trapezoidal one. I showed it to him once, and he was sure that it was drawn incorrectly because he has (someplace) the original deed.

What can one say to that?!?

The funny thing is, my DH is a grass lover and so takes care of the lawn, which has caused our neighbor's privet hedge to become more lush than it was when we moved in. It was scrawny and not growing well before we arrived ten years ago.This guy loves those hedges (planted by his dad) and so often thanks my DH for watering/fertilizing them!

Even more ironical is the fact that this neighbor barely takes care of his property --- it's basically a weed farm.

Molie


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 10, 13 at 17:04

Molie: Your Miscanthus 'Cabaret' looks like it's blooming very well. Does it bloom reliably and very late? I had one that only bloomed once. It wasn't in a great full sun position and that may have been the problem. A very beautiful grass when it's happy.

Bill: I like that combination of the fig tree, the impatiens and the euonymus. The fig tree looks happy - do you take special precautions winterizing it?

Wonderful driveway view, franeli! It's a great progression from the immaculate landscape close by and then moving into the colorful wild woods beyond. It must make driving to work or to the store a special experience.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Claire, yes, that Caberet is in full sun as are all of our grasses. It's always bloomed tremendously and is huge --- about 6 x 7 ft. To give you an idea of its size, the fence that runs along the garden is four feet high. My DH hacks it back --- cutting parts out and throwing them away every few years. We don't know anyone who wants this grass so we, sadly, just mulch what he removes.

Molie


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Claire, the fig tree has to fend for itself. Some years it used to die down to the ground and regrow every spring, but over the last several years it only dies back to the larger wood. If we have warm enough weather into October, usually, I may even get a few ripe figs. It really depends on late summer being hot though. I really just like the leaves.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

WOW!! Great batch of photos in this thread. Spedigrees, Molie and Franeli, I love that you have long views/vistas. It makes such a difference and all are absolutely gorgeous even though they at very different. It's so much fun to see everyone's properties.

Bill, your garden is pristine and looks fresh as spring! There are so many ideas to take away from your garden including hardscape as well as planting ideas. Botanic garden worthy!!

DTD, I'm tempted once again after seeing your Franklinia picture to try one. I remember your pictures from a few years ago, but never did get one. I know they can be a little fussy. I'm surprised its still putting out some blooms. When it goes through its main bloom, does it all bloom at once? I put in a stewartia instead of Franklinia and this was the first year it bloomed. I was a bit disappointed as although it was loaded with buds, about six per day opened! There was never a massive flush of bloom. But, with the bark, fall foliage and form, I'll give it a pass. LOL!

Claire, I really like the pieris/winterberry/grass combo. Really works well together. I want my winterberry to look like yours when it grows up!
I also found that it took a handful of years for my SAC to seed around. I always wondered why everyone called it a pest. But, this spring I must have pulled out hundreds of seedlings. Although the vine looks so good right now and not fuzzy yet, tomorrow I'm chopping them both down. I also noticed that the two of mine have distinctly different fragrance.

Molie, is that an orange rose near the agastache and rudbeckia? Would love to know what variety if it is in fact a rose.

Here are a few pics from my yard.

Chocolate joe pye playing nice with little devil ninebark.

The cottage area has been glowing orange with chrysanthemums and marigolds.

What a great, mild fall. The zinnias are still going pretty strong. The clematis in the foreground is only a fraction of the true size....of which all will be chopped tomorrow.

The amsonia is tricking me this year. Not getting its bright yellow fall foliage, but rather a mix of color, which I think I might like even more.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Thyme,
Thanks for the kind words! My Amsonia is still green, but last year it did turn a brilliant yellow. My Euonymus alata ("Burning Bush") are just barely showing some reddish, but I've seen some within a mile of my house that are flaming red already. Last year mine didn't get red, just had the leaves drop off. I hope this year will be better.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 12, 13 at 17:49

Very pretty fall garden, thyme2dig! That is one big clematis (or two big clematises). I'll bet you'll miss it when you cut it back.

The multicolor amsonia just looks so soft and fluffy, it'll be interesting to see if it settles into one of those colors.

My big old Osmanthus heterophyllus is blooming! I tried but I can't get a long shot that does it justice - it just doesn't make a show at a distance - you have to get up close and look up at 10 to 15 feet of little white fragrant flowers.

It's right next to the big old winterberry so the borderline makes a good show.

This is the view from the house and it's hard to get close with the grasses and winterberry in the way.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

If you go around to the street side you can really see the flowers in detail.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

It's never had berries - I'd love to see the dark blue berries on the osmanthus next to the red berries on the winterberry, particularly when the leaves drop. I've been hoping the little O. 'Goshiki's' would bloom and pollinate the big old one but it hasn't happened yet. It could be that osmanthus won't fruit this far north anyway because the cold would inhibit fruit development. I've also noticed that bees and other insects don't seem to be attracted to the flowers so they might not get pollinated here.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Claire, this gives an idea as to how large this vine has become. It is one vine and believe it or not, there's only about 10-12 stems at the base.

I have another at the other end of the porch. That one is my favorite smells in the garden by far. Sooooo sweet and fresh. Unfortunately, this one smells more like a mix of licorice and laundry detergent....hard to describe, but actually a bit nauseating for me. Never noticed such a strange smell from it before, so I'm going to see what happens next year. It it smells the same, I'm going to dig it out for good. Today it gets cut down to the ground. I have a new fence going in within the next few weeks! Very exciting, but I'm digging out and cutting back lots of plants. I'm planning a whole new look for the beds common with the fence. Fun!


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

First of all --- does the screen look strange for any of you? For me, the printed text has now crossed over into the area of white beyond the thin green vertical line.

Thyme, I love the shot of your cottage garden --- so different than the early spring/summer photos (loved your peonies!) but just as lovely, with the contrast of blues and oranges. I agree that the shadings of your amsonia are striking. And like franeli's fall shot, your long shots of the trees beyond the gardens highlight the more subtle markings of fall --- oranges and yellows that morph into browns. I love those! I know that folks look for the bright maple reds and purples of fall in NE but, to me, the green-to yellow-to orange shades have such a subtle, soft beauty.

You asked about my orange rose. It's an Oso Easy 'Paprika' rose that's basically carefree & continuous bloom. The blossoms are small and flat but cover the plant.

Bill, I agree with others that your gardens are botanical gems. Do you ever open them up for garden days viewing?

Claire, I have always longed for Winterberry --- wish I had a spot for them. But with such a small lot of only 1/3 acre, we have to be very selective. I know I can't have it all, but I sure do appreciate seeing it all in other people's gardens.

Molie


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 13, 13 at 9:58

Molie: That orange rose is a great color. I hadn't heard of that one.

I also see the text spreading across the whole window. It started with thyme2dig's Saturday, October 12 post and now includes the boilerplate Instructions on the bottom. The clippings, etc. are also moved over. I haven't seen this on other threads here or in a few other forums I visit.

Claire


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I too see the text spreading across the whole window, but in honesty I've seen this quite often in other threads. What's weird is that it does not happen to every post in a thread, only certain ones. It bugs me when it happens and the text goes over to the right and across an ad with a photo. Then you can't read the post!

Beautiful rose, Molie. Reminds me of a Bright Lights cosmos!

Dee


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Molie,
Thanks. I've never thought about opening the garden for viewing. I guess I've never thought my small property was anything special. Some people here talk in terms of acres of course, set near forests and seacoasts, and here I am in the north end of Providence, in the city with nothing but other houses around me! I certainly wouldn't mind showing it anyone who may be in the area.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

You're on, Bill! If we come east into Providence, I'll contact you. We've often thought about some "Wandering Days" drives to eastern CT, RI and MA, just not in the summer. Nothing is worse than 95 with summer traffic.

It's funny but growing up in CT, living here all my life except for short periods in VT & NH, I've never experienced the Newport area or viewed its mansions ---- kind of like New Yorkers who've never gone to the Statue of Liberty (it's right near by --- see it all the time --- maybe some day).

As to your "small property" ---I don't think it's the size of the yard that matter but rather the particular slant people take with their gardens and with their environment. Seeing plants growing in people's gardens is so much more informative and fun than seeing them in pots at a garden center. And, as one who travels often into NYC, I find city gardens very exciting and am often amazed at what some can do with their small spaces and the light vs. dark issues of city streets. It lifts the soul to see a place where someone relates the land they have, no matter how small, to the larger environment.

Molie


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

I don't quite know what happened with my post. I've seen the text go to the right margins when a photo is too large, but my photos were all "normal" sizes.......

Molie, now I just want to cry!! I ordered a paprika earlier last year to go in a bed where I have crimson Pygmy barberry and wanted a hotter colored bed. They shipped me cherry pie by mistake. Called them and they sent a replacement. Sent cherry pie again, so they must have had them all mislabeled. I kept both in the bed, but they're both going to get ripped out and moved because the cherry color just doesn't work and I really yearn for the orange. Now that I see what paprika really looks like in your garden, I'm going to try again to find them.

Bill, your garden is VERY special. Don't ever underestimate it. You should self-nominate for the Garden Conservancy Open Days program. It's a real gem that other gardeners would really enjoy.
I just looked at my camellia that I purchased earlier this year (thanks to your pictures!) and it has ONE bud! Woo HOO! It's such a little plant I really didn't expect anything. In your experience with smaller camellias, do you think the bud will actually open? I'm half expecting it to whither on the plant. Or have you bought all of yours a bit bigger? If its better to answer this question on your camellia thread that's fine with me.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Molie, I don't recall exactly what part of CT you live in, but you really should try to see the Newport area one day. It's worth the drive. You can let me know anytime you're in the area here, but I would probably recommend sometime in May to see most plants in bloom.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Thyme,
What camellia did you plant? Is it a fall or spring blooming type? I bought my "April Blush" plants (2) as fairly large ones, I think maybe 5 gal. and 2x2 feet. The "April Dawn" and "April Kiss" were smaller, from Logee's, in maybe 4 in. pots and less than a foot tall. I repotted and grew them outside for one summer and then I kept in the unheated sunroom for one winter. The next spring I planted them out, and they were about two feet tall, a little leggy, but had some good branching started. The "Snow Flurry" was bought from Camforest online, and was a one gal. about 1 foot x 1 foot. It grew quite fast. I've had it for about 18 years, and one April Blush almost as long.

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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Bill, I didn't realize you've had those camellias for so long. I went to Camellia Forest this past spring. They have a great catalog with cold hardy selections for fall and spring. I opted for fall blooming for my first try. It was a pretty small shrub for abut $15. Very healthy and it still looks great. I bought 'Autumn Spirit'. I've planted it in a very protected area near my deck, out of any wind, etc.......I'm curious to see how it does over the winter. If I'm successful with that one, I'd love to try a 'Snow Flurry'. I'm sure I'll get back to Camellia Forest at some point. Aside from a gazillion incredible camellias they had a really nice selection of interesting shrubs and trees. I picked up a number of varieties from them. It was a very nice nursery and they take very good care of their camellias.


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RE: Show us your landscape - a photo thread - October 2013

Bill_ri_zb6, SOS. I need to know *why* you don't have weeds!! This thread was started almost 3 months ago, so I'm hoping Bill or someone else sees it that can help me.

I'm in Austin and had my backyard dug up and mulched a little over a year ago because of our summer draught conditions. I had the landscaper use landscape fabric underneath the mulch, but still have weeds coming thru the fabric! The weekly weeding is too much, especially with the summer heat, and need someone, maybe Bill, to give me some advice to curtail the problem.

I don't like the use of anything toxic, so am hoping there is an all natural treatment. I have been told using newspaper or cardboard will take care of the weeds, but that would mean I have to lift the mulch to get it underneath, and it's a big space. What did you use Bill???


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