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Pests

Posted by RedBeard92 z7a NJ (My Page) on
Sat, Jul 2, 05 at 14:56

Anyone have some type of little hopper that covers itself in a little "puff" of cottony substance. They seem to hangout on the new and tender growth of my pathos, monstera, and crotons, but have been spotted elsewhere. They skitter away from your hand (like a squirrel running around a tree) and if you continue the persuit they jump off several feet.

Thanks,

Rob


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Pests

Mealy Bugs perhaps?


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RE: Pests

No, these little guys can hop. I'm seeing them on my sumac as well.

Rob


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RE: Pests

Funny - there's a thread on the Tomato Pest forum about this very same "mystery bug". I have it - so do a couple of others - and NOBODY can figure out what the heck it is.

Here is a link that might be useful: Help identify white insects


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RE: Pests

I have these bugs too and they are not mealy bugs. I looked them up last year and found the name easily and can't find it again. Will try. They are fast moving compared to mealy bugs and I remember alcohol was recommended. I didn't do anything because they kept my Buttered Popcorn ranunculus in check which was spreading all over. Now they have spread on the tomatoes and other plants.

Image hosted by Photobucket.com


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RE:maybe

I think this is what you are talking about...didn't notice they hopped long distances though.


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RE: Pests

That looks like it may be it. Looking at them they appear motionless and cottony like mealy bugs (only fluffier), but try to squish one and they will skitter to the opposite side of the bud and then finally "pop" off. Upon close examination they appear to be some sort of hopper that covers itself with a ball of fluff.

I started looking around the property yesterday and they seem to be invading everything!

Anyone having problems with sumac and/or ailanthus? The leaves on mine have been getting patchy white, withering to a crisp and the growing stems are getting a black look to them. Seems to be happening "en mass".

Rob


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RE: Pests

I'm from the tomato forum, and we have these too in Virginia, I have them on my tomatoes, citrus, and grape vines, they seem to be spreading very quickly. Still no definitive answer as to what they can be, any help is appreciated!!


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RE: Pests

Here's a picture - I also posted this on the Tomato Pest forum.

Here is a link that might be useful: The Mystery Bug


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RE: Pests

Nice shot felpec. I'm suppose to have a macro option but it hasn't worked as well for me.


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RE: Damage

Here is a shot of the damage from last year. My ranunculus was very healthy and lush at the begining of the season. Too lush actually, it was taking over.

Image hosted by Photobucket.com


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RE: Pests

How about a type of wooly aphid?
I just went back and looked closer. I saw little clear drops of liquid attached to them. Then scratched off the fluff and it looked like an aphid. What do you think?


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RE: Pests

Hello
I just spotted one on my grapevine today. The vine is new and just full of tender leaf growth. Where it had been (on the stem) had a very slight tan cast to it. Is there a safe control for these things? Don't we all have enough problems without these guys?
Pat


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RE: Pests

Might they be scale? But I'm not sure that scale runs away.

Redbeard92, is ailanthus not itself a pest down in south Jersey? Up here in the north, they are terribly invasive and my township is always urging residents to remove any growing on their property.

Here is a link that might be useful: white scale


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RE: Pests

I think you're right...woolly aphids. Daily spray downs with the hose have helped keep them from doing much damage. Some die in the process. Spraying with a soft soap solution may also help.
Gardens Alive, an organic gardening company, has plant-based, non-chemistry set insect control sprays that help control aphids. This is a link to one of them ->
It contains rotenone and pyrethrins...
Rotenone...a plant-based insecticide derived from certain legumes has an extremely rapid breakdown rate in soil and water. Pyrethrins...a plant-based insecticide set derived from certain members of the chrysanthemum family that have a fairly fast breakdown rate. When used reasonably and responsibly, both are far safer and less toxic than traditional chemical insecticides.

Also, some corn gluten meal(weed seed pre-emergent and nitrogen source) blends have Bt and other beneficial bacteria incorporated into their formula. I'm not sure if it is, but in many cases these bacteria attack insect pests during their larval stage. Prevent weeds and head off insect pests in one non-chemical step...can't beat it.

http://www.gardensalive.com/product.asp?pn=8659
http://www.gardensalive.com/product.asp?pn=8081


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RE: Pests

  • Posted by mprats z6NJ Plainfield (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 10, 05 at 22:43

I am so glad to see this here because I also have them in my garden. They have attacked the dahlias mainly, and I find that a spray of water does kill them. What gets to me is how fast and alert they are.


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RE: Pests

Well, I have since seen one jump and am not sure about the wooly aphids but maybe a type of psyllid as suggested.
Check out this image below. Near my infestation, I have found a green insect with orange markings on its back just hanging out and I am wondering if it isn't the adult form. I can't post the image yet because photobucket is doing some work on the server but will try to later. Still I can't get a real clear shot. Since they are inactive, I am wondering if they were just emerging. Do you see anything like that near your infestations?
They are everywhere this year. They are on my tomatoes, astilbe, among others. Last year, I did read an article that suggested wiping with rubbing alcohol. Haven't tried yet but seems like I will have to do something. Wonder if Ladybugs will eat them?

Here is a link that might be useful: jumping plant lice


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RE: Pests

Yes, RedBeard, I just found the same creature on my Fuscias tonight. White & furry, skitter away to the backside of the twig as you try to get a good look at them. Small amt of white web type stuff where they were located. We cut off the three shoots we found them on and ran for the Bug B Gone. As we spritzed them on the patio stone they hopped several feet-just tike a tiny, white, fuzzy hopper. They are VERY fast! Lost them in the chase and don't know if they died or not. It's been a few weeks since your post and I'm wondering if you've any new info avail? What is the damage if any? The pic from Loretta is exactly what we have here in Central NY area.


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RE: Pests

Found this in another forum. Sound like what we're talking about...

Here is a link that might be useful: citrus flatid planthopper - Metcalfa pruinosa (Say)


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RE: Pests

By the way, I don't think the green insect is related anymore. I just think they were leaf hoppers who maybe thought it was too hot to hop! : )
Anyway, I am going to try to bring a few to the extension center.


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RE: Pests

The first thing I'd try is putting a few drops of dishwashing liquid in a spray bottle, shake the bottle, and give them a squirt. I find the behind the sink stuff works just as well as the fancy stuff. Usually one application will kill any soft bodied critters, at least for a while.


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RE: Pests

Yikes! This bug is no good! I've been trying to identify this as well. It has killed my Hermans Pride archangel, then moved to my pansies (killed them too) and is on to my astillbe. It is NOT a mealy bug. The closest thing I've seen on the web is a planthopper species. However, it says that they don't normally kill the plant. What works to kill this bug? I'm trying Seven because I don't want to loose another plant!!


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