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1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

Posted by moandtg 8 (My Page) on
Sun, Jan 9, 11 at 22:30

Hello everybody,

So I am interested in planting some trees this spring or maybe this fall. And was hoping to see some before planting.
And to learn about suitability, etc. I live in Portland OR

Persian Ironwood Vanessa. Thinking about this...
Tanyoshu or pinus densiflora umbraculifera....
Ecualypti. Snow gum, E. pauciflora subsp. debeuzevillei,
cornus controversa verigata

Thanks, Mike


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Sun, Jan 9, 11 at 23:00

Persian Ironwood, aka Parrotia persica, grows well in my garden near Seattle.
Good fall color.
Mike
Parrotia persica

Parrotia persica


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

Heritage Trees of Portland
Your pine tree is on this list.

Unfortunately, the Hoyt Arboretum website touts a plant inventory list, but it is currently unavailable. There may be printed material at the arboretum visitor center.

Any Eucalyptus trees may be a 20-year gamble in Portland with single-digit temperatures.


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

Thanks for your replies.

Mike, the new buds on the Parrotica, when do they come out and how noticible are they? How old is your tree?

Larry, Thanks for the link to Heritage trees... I will go look at the pine tree. I have already planted two ecualyptus, one in fall 09 and another in fall 10. I sure hope that they will be ok. They have mulch and I will keep my fingers crossed.

Thank You both.

Mike


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset (My Page) on
    Mon, Jan 10, 11 at 2:06

Some years ago the Hoyt Arboretum had comprehensive labeling but it was based on grid locations rather than identifications of each specimen confirmed by their appearance etc., hence some labels were way off. Hunting for particular accessions of interest could and often did result in finding the label hanging on a completely different type of tree.

A good place to look for less usual kinds, such as gum trees is Cistus nursery on Sauvie Island. Not a big display garden or sales yard but there are some plantings and a fair selection of some very special items. They also do mail order shipping from their substantial collection in the greenhouses behind the scenes. See their web site.

Another Oregon nursery with likely the largest offering in western North America is forestfarm in Williams, down near the California border. See their web site, they are not really set up for visitors at all - but most of their stock is photographed and shown on the site. If you know the plant you are looking for well enough you can often actually confirm it is the same exact item you seek using these pictures of at least one example of the specimens in the nursery.


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

...since you are planting Eucalypts, you may as well look into Eucryphias.

The Oregon Garden near Silverton has had some years to mature; perhaps they have one or more of your interests.
---------------
Considering the trail signage at Hoyt, not surprising individual plants have been mislabeled.


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

Mike, you didn't show the bark on the Parrotia! The bark is also a very attractive feature. There are Parrotias at the Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden.


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow. gum/ tanyoshu

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Tue, Jan 11, 11 at 17:41

Here's a picture of the bark. The tree is just over twenty years old.
Parrotia persica
Mike


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

Thanks for the replies,

"....There are Parrotias at the Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden." Your talking about the one in Federal Way?
I was thinking to go and look at some gardens for inspiration and was planning on visiting gardens near Seattle. So, that one would be one the way. :)

Larry, I went to check out the Tanyoshu Pine yesterday. Thank You for letting me know where to find one. NE 39th and Couch in PDX. A little too big perhaps, but very, very impressive. I will have to see what my wife thinks...

Thank You All,

Mike

Here is a link that might be useful: Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

Yes, the one in Federal Way. There are a couple of good sized ones on the south side of the gazebo.


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 13, 11 at 13:18

If you were to come to up here to pursue this interest then your best resource would be Trees of Seattle. A separate Seattle tree map has also been produced by a friend of the book author.

An inferior Portland tree guide book was also put out by Timber Press some years ago. I did not mention it earlier because it is so weak.

Here is a link that might be useful: Trees of Seattle - Second Edition


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

Thanks for the info bboy. I thought I had responded already. First I am going to look closer to home, but I do think that would be great to do a little road trip and check out gardens near Seattle. I am planning on visiting the elizabeth miller botanical gardens in the spring, Wife willing.

Mike


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jan 26, 11 at 21:20

The main woody collections here are the Washington Park Arboretum and the Carl English Botanical Garden.


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Jan 28, 11 at 2:10

Down there the Elk Rock Garden (near Portland, right above the river) and the OSU Experiment Station near Aurora have interesting tree and shrub plantings. The Oregon Garden is weird, except for the conifer collection.

And being like the typical over-planted enthusiast's conifer zoo, that is weird as well - but in a different, more amusing way.


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

bboy,

Went to the Washington Park Arboretum, as was in the area. Was able to find eucalyptus only. Ironwood there but was not able to find.... Really is a lovely place....

Thanks,

Mike


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RE: 1st post where can see ironwood/ snow gum/ tanyoshu

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jan 31, 11 at 1:46

The trees and shrubs belonging to the collections there are located using a grid map. You can get the coordinates at the visitor center during open hours. Jacobson's book (mentioned above) also gives the coordinates of trees in the park - when they are kinds treated in the work* - and contains a version of the grid map.

*Species and cultivars known in Seattle only from the Arboretum are not included


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