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Snow weight damage help

Posted by toad_ca z7b Bellingham, WA (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 3, 14 at 13:16

We got 18 inches of snow on Sunday, Feb 22nd. It was too deep (and the ground was too saturated) to melt much, and then we got socked again last Saturday. Today it's 45 degrees and raining, so I can begin to see the damage.
What should I do for shrubs that didn't spring back up after the heavy snow left? So far, I'm seeing a Daphne that's leaning almost parallel to the ground. The same for my Nootka roses. As the rain continues, I'm sure I'll see more of the same. Suggestions?
Thanks.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Snow weight damage help

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 3, 14 at 13:53

Try staking the shrubs up. The root of your problem with those may be deformities due to careless container culture, so that they have wadded roots that are not anchoring them adequately. Or if planted recently, they have not taken hold yet - although there should have been good rooting out last fall, if they had a high percentage of intact roots, and were in their current positions in time for that.

Being suckerous the roses have the advantage of being able to grow out and away from their original planting situations. The daphne may have to be staked indefinitely if it does not become adequately rooted later. And if it is Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' those often have a sideways orientation anyway - although I don't know if this is an inherent characteristic or due to deformed roots not being able to keep them fully upright.


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RE: Snow weight damage help

  • Posted by toad_ca z7b Bellingham, WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 3, 14 at 18:25

Thanks bboy! The daphne is a Daphne x burkwoodii 'Carol Mackie' and it's been in the ground for at least two years. Possibly a dumb question, but should the stake be placed close in to force the plant upright, or should it be placed a few inches away with some fabric (like pantyhose) looped around it, pulling it upright?


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RE: Snow weight damage help

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 3, 14 at 21:11

Whatever seems to work, when you try it - including what looks good. But don't drive a stake of some diameter through closely grouped roots.

As with most container grown ornamentals Burkwood daphnes I see have a bird's next of circling roots beneath the crown.


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RE: Snow weight damage help

  • Posted by corrine1 7b Pacific Northwest (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 13:02

After the ice storm a few years ago our daphne was damaged. Unfortunately, once the summer heat came turned brown & died.

Other leaning plants that I could see the soil was so moist it tilted the rootballs I was able to use my garden fork away from trunk to insert & tilt back upright. We tied up the huckleberries since they had trunks flat to the ground. Carex Ice Dance was tattered, but didn't cut back until April. Slow regrowth, but looked great by early June.

Everything else except the daphne survived.

Those roses are tough, but you


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RE: Snow weight damage help

  • Posted by toad_ca z7b Bellingham, WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 20:25

Thanks again bboy, and thank you corrine1. I hope the Daphne will make it. It's the first one I've ever had survive and flower!


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RE: Snow weight damage help

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 5, 14 at 2:19

Apart from pandemic problem of bound roots on woody plants produced in containers main issue with daphnes is root rot. Many other kinds of small shrubs are prone to this also; the most dwarf types are basically rock garden plants needing the sharp drainage of rock gardens, walls and troughs.

There is also a virus that is affecting daphnes in this region. Luckily it may be including the nuisance Daphne laureola in its depredations.


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