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Mimosa tree question

Posted by electrofunk 8 (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 5, 07 at 21:08

What are your thoughts on the Mimosa tree? I live in the Ballard area of Seattle and this would be going in my front yard. Also, I was at Swansons over the weekend and didn't see any Mimosa trees in stock. Are they special order?

Thanks,

MD


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Mimosa tree question

Hi There
Mimosa trees will grow here, but they do need a site protected from harsh winds. They have brittle wood and are prone to limbs breaking off. Keep looking, you will probably find one somewhere.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 5, 07 at 21:53

A common item. But most places are not nearly stocked up yet. Try later in the season, spring or summer.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

I like them. We bought two, last year.

Quite a few breakage problems are due to people neglecting them, and letting problems and weakness accumulate.

If you properly prune it, or at least keep an eye on it, yearly, that type of tree can do better than its reputation.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

I found the following site: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1764/index.html
There's a bunch of negative reviews about the tree. Does this pertain to the PNW? Seems like all the negative reviews come from the South Eastern part of the US.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 5, 07 at 23:49

Not a weed in this part of the country.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

Definitely weedy in the southeast. But so are a lot of other favored northwest trees and shrubs that don't seem to be a problem here (Paulownia...WEED!).

The purple-leaved cultivar is a knockout. There is one very mature purple specimen at the Atlanta Botanical Garden that almost takes your beath away.

Laura


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RE: Mimosa tree question

This is my favorite tree. I planted it 3 years ago and the trunk is now at least 4 inches through and the canopy gives wonderful dapled shade. The flowers continue right to frost and the leaves fold up at night time. It's lovely. The only downside is the droppings from the flowers and leaves. I have it underplanted with epimedium and a swish of my hand hides all of the mess "under the carpet". I love it. btw, seed pods but no germinations.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 7, 07 at 11:29

One of my paulownias apparently did seed into my neighbors frequently irrigated flower bed awhile back, as a bunch of seedlings came up there last year. I have also seen spontaneous trees growing out of a couple dry stone walls - another place where there would be some protection from the usual summer drought in this area. Without the Eastern summer rains we are unlikely to see these filling unoccupied land like they do back there.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

  • Posted by ian_wa Seattle area (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 7, 07 at 16:52

I've also seen Paulownia reseed itself here on occasion, but only in irrigated places.

Albizia doesn't seem to get adequate summer heat in our region to ripen the seed, until you get down to southern Oregon. It also does not have the same disease problems here that it does in the south, and can be quite long-lived.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 7, 07 at 18:59

Many local silk trees have dead interior branches, due to disease problems.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

  • Posted by ian_wa Seattle area (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 8, 07 at 2:25

I've noticed that, but I always thought it was just older/lower branches dying off as new ones developed above them. What disease is it, I'm curious?


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RE: Mimosa tree question

  • Posted by bboy z8 WA USA (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 8, 07 at 13:05

I haven't paid enough attention to remember. During the 1970s it came up in classes at Edmonds Community College where the list of prohibited and acceptable street trees for Seattle was used. Think that list mentioned it, and probably the instructor as well.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

I have a patio set with flagstones where I planted 3 mimosas, 2 straight species and one rosea. Patio is raised and gets direct summer sun plus radiant heat off the house walls. The rosea is fairly recently planted (last fall) and small, did really well until this freezing winter. Looks like tops have died down to about 1 foot off ground. Don't know whether to wait to see if the dead part resuscitates before lopping off. New to trees and their behaviors. The rosea was supposed to be more cold-hardy.

There are many mimosas around here, some big and full with beautiful summer flowers. Hope my baby rosea survives. They like heat and they like to be watered in the summer.


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RE: Mimosa tree question

Is it good idea to plant a Mimosa tree in your yard? Any problem about this tree?


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