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Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

Posted by beckbunch WA 8 (My Page) on
Sat, Jun 16, 12 at 16:52

I have so wanted to get a rose to grow on this large, gorgeous trellis that my husband built a few years ago. It's in a part-sun area, and attaches to a hot tub structure, where a vine would look gorgeous climbing from the trellis onto the roof.

I first planted a Cecile Brunner rose and it got some truly disgusting rose disease and was removed and replaced with a Madame Alfred Carriere rose. I've had great success with roses in other areas of our property, but I think there's just not enough sun there for a rose to grow healthily and the Madame will soon be getting the axe as well.

So, if I went with a honeysuckle, would it just be too messy to have above a table? What about clematis? I want something that has a real wow factor and will get large enough to cover and shade the trellis, but I don't want something that will constantly drop things into our food.

Any ideas?

Eileen


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

Clematis take several years to get established but some do grow big enough for what you want to do. Many won't.


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

What about silver lace vine? Anyone ever planted it?


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

Sliver lace vine, Polygonum aubertii, is an unofficial noxious weed in western Washington. According to the Garden Wise association between the WNSLA and the WA State Noxious Weed Control Board, this planting option is suggested to be replaced with Clematis or our native honeysuckle, Lonicera ciliosa

Another option I'd consider would be chocolate vine, Akebia quinata, which is very tolerant of part shade, produces fragrant spring flowers and is mostly evergreen. Can be problematic in other parts of the country but no invasive issues here.


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

A neighbor had silver lace vine all over one side of his garage, took it out. Looked pretty messy to me.


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

In my experience Honeysuckle does not do too well in part shade simply because of powdery mildew.

I would personally go with a Clematis or Wisteria


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

What about Holboellia coriacea? I don't know if it commonly produces fruit or not, which could be messy, because my plant is small and hasn't even flowered yet. I also like the Akebia suggestion - it's one of my favourite vines.


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 19, 12 at 10:41

Would some variety of Grape fit the bill?
You wouldn't get the bumper crop you would get in full sun, but grapes can handle quite a bit of shade and still produce some grapes.
Mike


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

I love akebia as well, but already have it (the white and the purple) in a couple of areas and was looking to branch out a bit. Same with wisteria. I have a long wisteria walkway that runs the length of our house.

A grape might work. I hadn't really thought of that.


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

  • Posted by corrine1 7b Pacific Northwest (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 20, 12 at 11:32

Dutchmans pipe vine (Aristolochia durior)

fast growing vine with large heart shaped leaves
flowers small late spring or early summer
some say flowers stink
20 feet tall & wide


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

  • Posted by janezee Sunset 5, 8b, Whidbe (My Page) on
    Fri, Jun 29, 12 at 1:48

Have you considered a climbing hydrangea? My neighbor has one that is breathtaking. Probably doesn't get more than 4 hours of sunlight per day.


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RE: Part Sun BIG climber for dining trellis

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Jun 29, 12 at 21:07

Mildew is the result of genetic susceptibiliy combined with dry or drying soil and damp foliage. That's why it becomes noticeable as summer advances. Low growing season rainfall and summer fogs/dews of the Pacific Coast are probably just about ideal.

Some kinds of honeysuckle mildew readily and others do not. Lonicrea periclymenum 'Serotina' is quite a good one overall, and it does not get covered in mildew.


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