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Echinacea? Replanting lavender?

Posted by ellen_portland z8 OR (My Page) on
Mon, Sep 17, 12 at 16:35

Hi,
I bought Echinacea for the garden at the beginning of the summer and it was beautiful. Now it's looking a bit tired. Can someone fill me in on the care and feeding of this plant? How can I keep it greener? Will dead heading produce more bloom? How do I winter it? I tried to look through google and couldn't really find much.

Also, I am hoping to replant my lavender for next season as it has gotten very long and leggy. What is the best time of year to do this?


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RE: Echinacea? Replanting lavender?

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 17, 12 at 17:19

Maybe your coneflower needs to be fertilized. Depends on what, specifically "tired" consists of in this instance.

If you buy lavender now you will get in on the superior fall planting time. But if you wait until the peak selection next year you will have more to choose from.


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RE: Echinacea? Replanting lavender?

A couple of thoughts on both these plants.......they are really picky about well-drained soils. For that reason alone I would be less inclined to plant now as opposed to early next season when they again become available for sale. While fall IS an ideal time to plant for most plants in this area, it is just too close to our wet season for good root development before saturated soils take over. Same for other fast drainage lovers like hebes, agastache, some of the more woody salvias, etc. Even well-draining PNW soils can become excessively wet in our usual winters.

Cultivars of Echinacea purpurea generally fair better in our area than the new, more colorful hybrids. First, most of the hybrids do not have a great reputation for their ability to perennialize regardless of climate and second, they seem to be even more sensitive to winter soil moisture than the purple coneflowers.

FWIW, I would not necessarily consider it out of context for a perennial planted this season looking a little "tired" by this time of year. I'd be inclined to let it be for now and look to see how well it springs back next year........if it does at all.


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RE: Echinacea? Replanting lavender?

Yes, deadheading will promote additional blooming. At least it does for mine.


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RE: Echinacea? Replanting lavender?

Thanks so much everyone. I so love lavender and they have been so beautiful it is surprisingly hard to have to pull them out and replant (sentimental- planted when we bought the house) I guess I will be buying a bunch next season.

Thanks on the Echinacea, this is the first time I've had large plants of these and was really unsure of their care and feeding. Hope they will come back next year.

Actually, when IS next season to buy Lavender? LOL- Spring? I will be wanting "regular" and "Spanish"


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RE: Echinacea? Replanting lavender?

Prune the lavender back now to correct the legginess. There's still time before first frost for it to start coming back, but if you're nervous about the tender new growth possibly getting frost nip, you can prune it back this fall after the blooms have faded, or first thing in the spring. If you wait until spring to prune it, it can delay blooms. Prune to about 2 inches above the junction between the hardwood and the greenwood. Lavender does not send new growth up from hardwood, so avoid cutting into the hardwood. I've included a link to a video from a lavender farmer below, but the website at this link http://treesandshrubs.about.com/od/pruning/a/how-to-prune-lavender.htm has more information. If you prune now, you can take cuttings to root. Depending on where you live, there might still be enough time for them to start rooting before cold weather sets in, but you may want to bring the cuttings in under cover, or mulch them for the winter.

Here is a link that might be useful: Pruning lavender


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