Return to the Northwestern Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Eucryphia Report for 2011

Posted by larry_gene z8_Sunset6_OR (My Page) on
Mon, Sep 12, 11 at 23:51

The Cult of the Eucryphians is small (there may be 2 or 3 of us on this forum), but they deserve an annual report:

This is the first year all three of my varieties bloomed profusely, with some overlap in the bloom period.

milliganii x lucida (two plants), planted 2002, height 11 feet

...blossom close-up

lucida "Pink Cloud", planted 2000, height 15 feet

...blossom close-up

intermedia "Rostrevor", planted 1992, height over 25 feet

...blossom close-up

------------------
I have another Rostrevor that blooms sparingly, but has achieved a height of 37 feet (measured by shadow comparison).

All three varieties attracted bees this year, as the quantity of blossoms was ample and the local bee population increased.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 12, 11 at 23:53

Nice effect from the 'Pink Cloud'. One I spotted in a Seattle yard I figured to be about 18' tall.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Way more blossoms and more honeybees on my E. x nymansensis this year than the past 2 years.
Did they like the wet spring?


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

I have two E. x nymansensis which seem to be quite happy this year. They are 12 to 15 feet and really beginning to fill out after heading for the sky during their first few years with me.

Such a luxury to have a flower filled tree at this time of year.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Very nice, thanks for sharing. Apparently mine are growing about half as fast as yours, judging by your comments.

So who can tell me how to definitively distinguish 'Mt. Usher' from 'Rostrevor'? Supposedly I have both, but I really can't tell them apart.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Another nice thing about this group of eucryphias is their small footprint--sometimes I think my two clumps of rhubarb take up as many square feet as the large Rostrevor.

The one Rostrevor has been a heavy bloomer for about ten years now, so it took nearly ten years to get going, although it bloomed some from a young age.

Wet springs are fine--the Rostrevors didn't mind our 64" rainfall in the mid-1990's. Summer water is more important, I noticed some green leaf drop a couple of weeks ago and put the sprinkler underneath again. They normally only shed yellow/red leaves.

I've heard of Mt Usher, but you would have to research complete descriptions for each type to see what the difference might be. My two potted Rostrevors were purchased from differently labeled rows (one being Nymansay) but turned out to be the same.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Sep 14, 11 at 20:24

It's Eucryphia x intermedia 'Rostrevor' and E. x nymansensis 'Mt. Usher': they're not even from the same cross. Like 'Nymansay' the latter produces bigger flowers, but differs in that these are often double. And its leaves are usually simple. In this respect it resembles 'Rostrevor'.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Then perhaps Mt. Usher would not have the "intermediate" leaves, smooth-edged on the stem-end half and toothed-edged on the tip half (like Rostrevor leaves)?


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 15, 11 at 10:56

Should look more like 'Nymansay' but without as many divided leaves and with more petals. In fact, it looks more like E. cordifolia than does 'Nymansay', and neither has any E. lucida involvement - or characteristics.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

I got mixed up. I meant to say that I can't tell apart 'Mt Usher' from 'Nymansay'. I'm wondering if they are both the same plant and one of my sources didn't identify it correctly.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 15, 11 at 13:59

How come it's not more widely grown? I like the blossoms. Does it have any Fall color?
Is there a hardy issue, and it can't be grown up here in the foothills?
Mike


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Somewhat hard/slow to reproduce--offered only by specialty nurseries--a bit expensive even in 1- and 2-gallon sizes--many interesting hybrids only offered in Australia and the UK.

The varieties I have are considered evergreen.

The Rostrevor has a springtime flush of yellow leaves once new growth is underway and an autumn flush of yellow leaves with red spots. Each flush involves less that 20% of the leaves, but is interesting.

Lucida leaves that want to fall simply turn brown.

The magic number usually published is 15°F. I would say the lucida with its smaller leaves is good for a few degrees cooler and the milliagnii hybrid with its tiny leaves might do OK in single digits above zero. The low temperature here since 1992 is 11°F so they have not been severely tested.

They do right themselves after an ice storm or heavy snow and do not become deformed.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Fri, Sep 16, 11 at 11:34

I get down to single digits every few years up here in the foothills so that lets me out. Thanks for the info larry gene.
Mike


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Sep 16, 11 at 11:47

Yes, hardiness is the problem. Yet another group that often grows for a long time here - and then gets nailed. How long a time depends on when the next single digit winter comes around. In Maple Valley your best bet would be E. glutinosa. That species is certainly worth a try, it has even been called

One of the most glorious of woody plants

by The Hillier Manual of Trees & Shrubs.

Local independent garden centers have had several kinds of eucryphias in recent years:

Here is a link that might be useful: Xera Plants - Trees


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

I've found E. milliganii to be hardier to cold than E. glutinosa, in a pot anyways.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sun, Sep 18, 11 at 1:06

Now how is it that you had occasion to find this out?


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Where do you find these Eucryphias in Washington or Oregon? I am looking for a large one and I am not having any luck!


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

I'll tell you - send me a PM if interested.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Do you want an already mature specimen or one that will grow to become large?

Gossler Farms (Springfield, OR) currently offers a half-dozen varieties.

My plants, as a group, were in continuous bloom from the beginning of July through the end of September.


E. milliganii x lucida, nickel-sized blossoms


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

Still have blooms on the later of my two. They were covered in bloom and all a'buzz for months.


 o
RE: Eucryphia Report for 2011

I'm down to one petal and one opening bud on the Pink Cloud and about a hundred blooms on the milliganii x.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Northwestern Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here