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All of them

Posted by ChickenCoupe 7a (My Page) on
Sat, Mar 24, 12 at 8:56

Every last one of them. All thirty tomato plants. Not a leaf has gone untouched. They are all in varying pots and are varying varieties. They were fine yesterday except droopy. Whatever the problem is, it's airborne.

I am very miserable. I worked SO hard to get them this far. They are not in a different location than they were previously (only 2 feet in front of a covered porch). I watered a few yesterday that were more sheltered from the rains. All are identical. Many of the spots on the leaves are not gold as in the following picture but are white in color.

Nice, huh?

src="http://s1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg546/boniferous/?action=view¤t=DSC01877.jpg">

"http://s1243.photobucket.com/albums/gg546/boniferous/?action=view¤t=DSC01877.jpg"


bon


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: All of them

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RE: All of them

I'm heading out to an auction so have to keep this post short. First I want to state it is hard to make a judgement on a picture and especially one picture. I assume these plants are outside exposed to the elements? Does the plants look ok otherwise or are they wilting and looking like they will die? My first thought was weather/environmental issues. Not being able to see the leaf up close it is hard to tell for sure what the affected areas of the leaves looks like. I've seen certain insects eat our areas but that is easy to tell if looking at the leaf in person. I still lean toward weather/environmental issues and unless the plants look worse than this leaf does I would expect them to recover. I have 2 trays that have experienced some issues but in 1-2 weeks they will be fine. I hope they survive and do well for you. Jay


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RE: All of them

Bonnie, I agree with Jay that it appears to be environmental stress. We saw it in a lot of photos on this forum last year. It can any kind of environmental stress, but most often I believe it is a combination of stronger winds than the plants have been used to and a change in the temperature...usually an upward change. It also could be that at the same time the plants were exposed to wind and warmer temperatures, they got a bit too dry. If that occurred, they wouldn't have had enough moisture in their vascular system to combat the wind and the change in the temperatures.

Environmental stress usually results as a combination of 2 or more environmental stresses in combination that put more stress on a young plant than it can handle.

I agree with Jay that in a limited number of cases, you'll see similar damage from some insects, but yours doesn't look like insect damage to me.

I am assuming these plants were hardened off to the wind and sun before the leaf issue hit? If you were in the process of just starting to harden them off, you might have let them stay out in the wind and sun too long. Usually, though, with that the leaves sunburn but don't look quite as bad as the leaves on your plants.

Relax. If it is environmental stress they ought to be able to overcome it. Don't remove the damaged foliage because even damaged foliage will conduct photosynthesis and that will help the plants recover more quickly. The damaged leaves themselves won't show improvement, but new growth that comes out in the next few days will be fine.

This sort of environmental stress is seen most often on young plants in early Spring when it is fairly windy and the weather is yo-yoing all over the place.

Dawn


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RE: All of them

Thanks

Yeah, they're completely hardened off, just potted up and I was moving them around to avoid excessive rain. The spots are topical only and not coming from within the plant leaves itself so it surely is something "environmental" or airborne.

While I was reading the comments I wonder did they need a hardening off period before I put them back out from under the porch into the sun? After all, they were fine when it was cloudy but when the sun came out and I moved them, this showed up.

I put these hardened-off tomatoes back on the porch to avoid excessive rain for 2 .. maybe 3 days. Then, when the excess rain ended I put them outside. In fact, that seems like the main variable that would do it. They weren't gradually exposed to the sun with at all. No other variables were different in any way (in culture). Poor things. I probably did it to them. lol

bon


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It all depends on how old the seedlings were and on how well-hardened they are. Very young seedlings or those that were barely hardened-off often will suffer damage if put back into shade for only a day or two and then put back into the sun. To play it safe, I always start the hardening off process over again if I have to interrupt it for a couple of days. One way to know if your plants are hardened off enough to tolerate being moved to the shade then back out into the sun is to look at their foliage. If the foliage is a deep, dark green and is fairly thick, it won't hurt to pull them into a protected area for a couple of days and then put them back out into the sun. If the foliage is still fairly thin and more of a very light green, the foliage is too tender to tolerate being moved into a sheltered area for a couple of days and then back out into the sun. In that case, you have to start over with the one hour per day, two hours per day, three hours per day, etc., escalation of hardening off all over again.

The only things I've seen cause damage like you have on your plants other than environmental stress is when something chemical gets on the leaves, including soap or oil sprays that are stronger than what a young plant's tender vegetation can withstand.

Dawn


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Speaking from my experience many times I move plants back and forth and with the cold frames during cold weather many times early in the season I will cover them for a few days and then expose them again. Like Dawn said on older plants you won't see any issues normally. Early in the season on younger plants you do. I notice more trouble with exposing them to wind again. I've been grafting this year. And it has reinforced the need to be very gradual in re introducing light again. A very slow and gradual process. You remove all light for 5 days or so and then start introducing it again. A very slow process. I have learned a few practices to help but when you first start 10 minutes of room light can be too much. So again like Dawn said the more tender and young a plant is the more it might be affected by environmental changes. In your case nothing they shouldn't recover from. Jay


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RE: All of them

Thanks again! They're doing okay despite the damage. I'll be certain to re harden them in the future just to be safe or at least move only one to see the reaction. I'm pretty certain that's the culprit unless there was something in the air that morning. Never know. :)


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RE: All of them

Last year, a lot of people had that type of damage. Everyone always wants to blame it on something in the air, but unless you're near an oil spill or an area with heavy ozone, it isn't what's happening. lol


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My tomato plants have a little damage as well. I put them inside for 24 hours then back outside again. There was no sun when they were put back out but only cloudy sky and misting rain for a couple of days, plus heavier rain for short times. It still did some damage and the leaves have some brownish spotting on them. They look healthy otherwise, but I suspect the rain was enough to wash the nutrients right out of the pot. I am going to give them a little fish emulsion later today and see if they snap out of it. They are not growing fast at all so I know they need a boost of something.


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RE: All of them

A few of mine have done that too and I didn't even move them. The damage isn't as bad as in your picture, it's just a couple of spots on a few leaves, so I'm not too worried about it. I figured it was just because we had a few cloudy days.

Leslie


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RE: All of them

They're starting to look a bit wimpy and aren't growing well. The new leaves are OK. Meh, I just don't much care any more. I've been out looking at my dirt and I'm sick of it, really. Can't do nothing without miracle grow or some chemical crap.


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RE: All of them /

By the way, I live in an oil town. Cushing: The world's pipeline central. A superfund site sits 1/2 mile away as well as a grain mill constantly barraging the air with crap. I still think it was the result of Obama showing up the day before I found them this way.


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RE: All of them

Bon. I hope they perk up. That must be heart-breaking. :(

Jo


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Bon, just sit down and rest, things will get better. My pepper and tomato starts looked terrible. I have family members that have been very sick and every thing around home has been neglected. My daughter went back to work Monday and I have had a little time to catch up on things around here. The garden is starting to look good, the plants that were a month old and less than 1" high are starting to grow. I have mowed two lawns. I still have the rest of today and tomorrow to work on things here before starting back on projects for my daughter.

I know that at times it seems as though things will never fall into place, but they will, just keep chipping away and you will be amazed at how well every looks in the future.

Larry


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RE: All of them

Bon,

Practice the art of patience.

Plants can look great one week and bad the next, and then look great the week after that. This early in the year, their condition can change a lot as weather conditions change.

Gardening is not a pasttime that gives you instant results. We've been here for 14 springs now and have heavily, heavily enriched our soil every year and it is just now starting to reach the point where I am even kinda, sorta happy with it. Does that mean that the previous 13 springs have given disappointing results? No, not at all. It does mean that I have spent a lot of time working hard each year to ensure that "next year" will be better. And for the most part, notwithstanding all the things weather can do to plants, each year is better than the year before because the soil does continue to improve and the plants in that soil continue to improve.

You cannot just go out and do soil improvement for a year or two and expect amazing results, unless you spend a huge amount of money to import a large amount of really rich and loamy soil. Soil-building takes time, and when you are gardening, no matter what you are planting, the whole process starts with building that soil on an long-term, on-going basis. Heat eats compost, so no matter how much you add, much of it will be gone by the end of the current season. That is the reality of gardening in a hot climate.

You just have to focus more on the long-term results you will get from continual soil improvement, and not let little setbacks get you down. In gardening, it is all about the journey itself, not just the destination.

Hang in there,

Dawn


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Bon, I have heard a picture is worth a thousand words. I want to show you a picture of my native soil. It wont even perk test for a septic system, but I am trying to grow a garden on it.

The first picture is where I piled compost at the edge of the garden last fall. The first 2" is compost that I have not moved yet (black), the next 8" is my native soil that I am trying to amend (tan in color). The 2ND picture is of vegetables I have growing this year. My soil is always late drying out, I just mudded these plants in a few weeks back. They are not great, but they are growing, this part of the garden has been amended for 6 years.

I am nowhere near where I want to be, but I think I am headed in the right direction. I think you are also, but it will take some time.

Larry
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Photobucket


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Larry, I see a few corn plants that you had better dig up and move because that row is not perfectly straight like the others. LOL


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Larry! Yeah.. that speaks volumes LOL You poor thing but what a great job! I keep telling myself that, at least, I have some decent soil to work with as the "yarden" area has had white clover as ground cover for years and patches of the topsoil have good tilth. I noticed tons and tons of worms in the mud yesterday. I did a mock site/civil plan of the lot the other night and realized everything is draining right in the garden area or is washing over it to get to the ultimate water source. LOL So, it's still very wet. Live and learn, eh?

@Dawn I keep telling myself this over and over. It is a bit tough when they look great and then all of a sudden.... but I don't realize that's normal LOL Actually, I addressed this after your comment in the other post. I'm trying to turn my attention to some flower beds to keep from obsessing over these poor victims. When my willow sticks start sprouting I'll have something to focus on, too. In pots! (LOL)

Here's what I'm going to do about my impatience though. Maybe this will help any other newcomers who are very impatient as I: I've decided to use some very large planters I have stuffed with some miracle grow. That way, if everything else goes to pot because of soil problems or from weather extremes I can baby those and maybe still have "something" to take pride in. hahaha

And then why do I forget about the coming fall garden?!

My soil finally warmed up! I got the beans in the ground.


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Carol, don't be picking on my garlic. I know its sickly but I just pulled the Elbon Rye from around it less than two weeks ago. It looks naked and sunburned, but it has feelings and would be hurt by your remark. It is crooked because when I planted it I was leaning over that drainage ditch (just to the left of it, now full of Oak shavings) to try to find a bare spot in the rye to plant it.

All rows are crooked, I was told as a child that you could get more in a crooked row, and the mule didn't get as bored walking a crocked row.

Larry


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Larry, I think the joke is on me because I really thought it was corn. LOL Probably because I have never had garlic that looked as good as yours. I think your garden looks nice. With everything you have going on in your life, I don't know how you have had time to do anything in your own garden.


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Thank you, Carol, sometimes I get spread a little thin but things always work out. This one garden is the only one of 5 that I have even started on this year. The other 4 will equal about 1.6 times what this one is.

I will look after Mom and my SIL tomorrow and try to do a few things for DD after that, then a big weekend here, DW is 73 tomorrow, all 6 of her children will be here and heaven only knows how many others.

I bought corn, southern pea, and green bean seed today, sure hope I can work the ground soon.

Larry


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I thought it was the ornamental striped Japanese maize, but without any of the pink color showing.

Larry, that garlic sure does like all that water and mud you've had all year.

Enjoy spending DW's birthday with her and the family.

Dawn


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Larry, sometimes I find it amazing how plants behave. Last year, I planted a bed of carrots following seedmama's instructions of spacing on a napkin, etc. I probably planted 60 seeds and I think about 6 came up. One came up this Spring in that same location.

I am truly carrot challenged, so I was very pleased when Dawn wrote instructions of how she plants and gets a crop so I had great hopes for carrots this year.

I had a couple of huge packages of seed so I decided to be very generous with them. I planted late one evening and it was getting dark so I decided to just leave them for the night and cut some cardboard the next morning to cover them. I thought the birds probably wouldn't bother them overnight. The next morning we had to run to Arkansas, and we had only been home for a few minutes when the rain started. I gave up on the carrot bed since we got 7 inches of rain in the next few days. After the rain stopped, I saw birds down in that bed a couple of times, but noticed that I had a lot of radish plants coming up which were planted on the opposite side of the raised bed from the carrots.

Guess what? I did everything wrong that you could do wrong and I have little carrots coming up all over. LOL Now it remains to be seen if I can actually grow carrots, but at least I have a fighting chance this time.


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Carol, If 7" of rain didn't carry off all that carrot seed, then you must have the luck of the Irish. If I'd had 7 inches of rain in that brief of time span, my carrot seeds would have been floating down the Red River.

My favorite way to plant carrots and lettuce in Fort Worth used to be to rototill the plot, plant six tomato plants in it, and the scatter sow mixed carrot and lettuce seed all over the bed. They'd pop up all over and serve as a living mulch. As I thinned the lettuce, we ate the thinnings as baby lettuce, and I didn't thin the carrots very much until they were big enough that the thinned ones I pulled could be eaten as tiny baby carrots. I harvested everything closest to the tomato plant root zones first, and by the time the tomato plants were large enough to really shade the soil, the lettuce was burning up in the heat and finishing up, and the carrots were not too far behind so then the tomatoes had that space all to themselves.Up here, though, the nights stay colder longer and tomatoes generally go in later and I don't do it that way anymore. I did plant my lettuce and carrots that way the first couple of years here with good results one year but not the next. The soil here is less cooperative, it slopes a lot, and the rain either doesn't come at all or comes in huge downpours that wash away seed.

I wish I had planted carrots in the 2012 potato bed in the Peter Rabbit Garden because it has very loose loamy soil this year after tons of amending and the potatoes in it are growing like crazy. You can bet that next year it won't be the potato bed--it will be the carrot bed. It is raised 16" above grade level on perfectly flat ground. I wish I had 40 more beds just like it. By next year, I bet I have at least 2 beds like that instead of one. It takes a lot of growing medium to fill a bed 16" high, but I bet it would grow incredible carrots.

Dawn


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RE: All of them

I had hoped to have a carrot bed by this Spring, but you know what my life has been like this year, so it didn't get built. Al is also going to build me a flower bed and as I was reading your message above, he was asking me about the size so maybe I can get both done at once. So much of my yard is shade that I never get to plant the annuals that I would enjoy having. I am also trying to cover an eyesore.

I have a raised bed in my garden that has never been very productive. I have only used the free 'mulch/compost' that the county makes available one time and it was for that bed. It was really sorry stuff and I have been adding leaves and compost, and bags of this and that, now for several years trying to correct it. It spent the winter filled with tons of leaves, then got compost about a month ago. My plan was to plant a strip of carrots down one side, and strip of radishes down the other side and squash down the middle. I was really just trying to utilize the space until the squash got big. I plan to cover the entire bed with row cover until the squash needs to be pollinated (and maybe longer if the bugs are bad). The radishes should be gone before the squash is big enough to shade them out and the carrots should still get plenty of sun. The seed couldn't wash out of the bed, so I guess I just got lucky that any came up and I must admit that I was very surprised.

Now back to the flower bed. It is probably going to be 4 by 8 with a trellis across the back which is the south side. I realize that is not the best way to go, but I am trying to cover a view I don't want to look at on my south property line. I think with as much hot sun as we get that it will not be a problem. What do you think?

The bed is probably just going to be made of landscape timbers either two or three high. I have a big pile of topsoil that I am going to use, plus some compost. So the purpose is threefold, (1) move the pile of topsoil (2) see less of my neighbors mess (3) give me a place for flowers.

Now give me ideas for what I can put on the trellis. I am mostly interested in summer coverage, but if there was something evergreen that was not invasive, I would consider that. I really don't like tea roses at all but have had a couple of climbers in the past that weren't too bad so I might even consider that. Is the honeysuckle that isn't invasive an evergreen plant?

So....if you were building a flower bed that had to have a trellis on the back side (which is mostly south), and you needed nice coverage, what would you do? I am thinking a couple of small shrubs so the bed isn't completly bare in the winter, and I would love things that butterflies would like. If I could get the trellis plants and maybe a couple of shrubs started this summer, I could work on the idea more this winter and plan a little better. This summer the annuals will likely be zinnias, marigolds, and nasturtiums because that is all I started, and I have lots of zinnias and marigolds. So this year the colors are going to be yellows, reds, and oranges, but I would like the back to be something that would be a good backdrop for other colors if I decide to change it from year to year. LOL

OK - gardeners - plan! Give me your ideas. It's wide open at this point.


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RE: All of them

Maybe a passionflower vine if they are not too invasive in your soil and rainfall.

The honeysuckles I have that stay evergreen much of the winter can grow twice as high as the nearest support and easily 4' wide, so they'd eat up your whole bed. However, they'd block that view if they stayed green in the winter in your climate. I assume y'all get a bit colder up there than we do down here.

I likely would put moonflower vine up on that trellis at least the first year. It grows quickly, and the beautiful flowers have such a magnificent scent that is just intoxicating.

For shrubs, someone in your area might have better ideas than I would. I only plant tough old shrubs that tolerate extreme drought and heat and clay soil. I have no real idea what would grow in good soil with lots of moisture. I like hollies because they are evergreen and provide berries for the birds, but the kinds of hollies I grow all get pretty big and would hide the trellis.


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Dawn, If I had a holly that would grow tall quickly I might just plant that along the property line and put the flower bed somewhere else. I don't know what to plant because the lateral lines are probably only about 6 feet from the property line so I am trying to use the space in between and not plant something that would cause a problem by working it's way into the lines. It is an infiltrator system so it isn't pipes, but I don't want anything that might interfere.
I am not only dealing with heavy rainfall, but ground that is likely to be constantly moist.

I should have planted something there years ago, but I just couldn't decide what to put there. It wasn't a problem when we moved here, but then it became a rental property. No one has lived there for a year or so because the last tenants trashed it so badly that it couldn't be rented again without work. They did part of the work but didn't rent it again, thankfully.

I have never grown a passion vine, but I think they are very pretty. I wondered about honeysuckle spreading. I have one of the common types on a fence and I hate it. I finally got rid of it in one place, but on the other side of the gate, it has grown around the fence and even bends poles. I cut it drastically every year, but it lives on.

I just haven't figured out the best way to solve this little problem, and I have waited much too long. I could have had a big hedge there by now if I had planted it when I first started talking about it.

Which holly do you grow and where do you get them?


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Because of the lateral lines, I'd likely go with a vine, but that's because I don't know what shrub roots would or wouldn't interfere with the lines.

The holly I use the most is Burford Holly. I have both the regular one and the dwarf one, although the dwarf one--if not pruned into a shape God never intended for it to be--is still quite large. It is dwarf only in comparison to the huge Burford Holly, which at our house has so far reached a height of around 10-12' and a spread of about 8'. When allowed to attain its natural shape and size, Burford Holly makes a large sort of pyramid-shaped shrub with beautiful dark green glossy leaves and red berries. The tiny flowers are barely visible in early spring but have an amazing scent, and the bees, moths and other pollinators have been visiting ours for the better part of the last two weeks. I like it because it is the right scale for our two story house and I used it for shade along the south wall of the house. It tolerates very dry conditions once established (as do most hollies) but also tolerates really wet soil.

There are many wonderful hollies and I prefer the evergreen ones to the deciduous ones, although we have a lot of the native Possumhaw Holly, which is deciduous, here. In my climate and with the rainfall we have here in southcentral OK, I'd clasifify them as growing at a moderate speed. With your soil and average annual rainfall, they likely would grow faster for you than they do for me.

For constantly moist soil in my zone, I use Southern Wax Myrtle, but even this far south it can struggle with cold injury and dieback in very cold weather like we had in the winter of 2010-11, so it might not be cold-tolerant enough for your county.

Given that the house next door is a rental and tenants may or may not keep the yard looking neat and tidy, I'd probably choose an evergreen shrub if I were there dealing with that situation.

With some hollies, you need pollinator plants of a different variety in order to get good fruitset. One of the Chinese hollies might do well there for you. They don't like my clay here.

Instead of a shrub you could plant an evergreen vine but I have no experience with evergreen vines so don't know which one would do well in your conditions.. If you did that, you could put smaller mounding shrubs in front of the vine for interest--maybe one of the dwarf abelias or dwarf yaupon hollies. Oakleaf hydrangea would look good in spring, summer and fall, but it is not evergreen.

For a quick annual screen, you can't go wrong with castor bean plants, but I wouldn't plant them if there are dogs or small children around because of their toxicity.

You might want to go to the website of Sooner Plant Farms and look through their listings of shrubs to see if you see anything that interests me. That wouldn't have anything on their website that is not well-adapted to Oklahoma, and sometimes I see their plants in big box stores. You also could look at the Proven Winners website to see if anything there catches your eye. It may be tricky to find something that gets too enough but not too tall since you have oodles of moisture in the average year.


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Thanks Dawn. It isn't the lawn so much since the landlord comes over and mows that. It is junk and some of the people that have lived there, that I don't want to look at. LOL

Our side yard is where the picnic table is and where I am always out working, where I grill, etc., and there is nothing between my yard and the neighbors.

I really would like to have a nice tall wooden fence but have several projects ahead of that one, and that is the only side that is an issue. It isn't that my yard is so pretty, because it isn't. I have way too much junk myself, but I'm working on it. LOL It seems we have lived through one small construction project after another, for 10 years now. Everyone has boats, or jet skiis, or motorcycles, or something, so it isn't ever going to be pretty, but I just need a little more privacy on that side. My permanent neighbors are all great, but each time one of these three rentals (all owned by the same person), get a new tenant, we all form a little 'neighborhood watch' until we know what we are dealing with. So far it has never been good. I can only see one of them from my house and that is what I want to cover.

Oh well, I guess I'll keep working on an idea. Thanks for your help because you have given me more to think about.


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Carol, I did Carolina Jessamine on our chain link fence for evergreen foliage and pretty yellow spring flowers. it can be helped to grow laterally on your support, and you can grow flowers or small shrubs in front of it. The only thing that didn't do well with it was some catalpa tree wisp we put in... the vine constantly climbed it and pulled it towards the fence. Easy to control when it overwhelmed the fence, and got a major trimming with no lasting ill effects (possibly fewer flowers the next season, but bounced back) so my neighbor could ride his mower through.

Here is a link that might be useful: carolina jessamine


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Oooh Mia, I like that. After reading Dawn's comments I am thinking that the trellised vine and the raised bed should be two features rather than the one I was considering. I think I will start looking for that vine. Do you think that two plants would be enough to eventually cover an eight by eight trellis, or do I need more? I like the evergreen idea.


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I don't mean to throw a wet blanket on great plants, but....

The last time I checked, Carolina Jessamine was considered toxic. I love the plant, especially when it is in bloom, but I won't plant it.

It is toxic to bees. The honey they make that contain its nectar is toxic to other bees. (sigh) It can be toxic to children if they eat any part of it, and it is toxic to some livestock. I am not sure if it is toxic to dogs and cats, but mine chew on anything green that is growing, so I don't grow Carolina jessamine.

You should Google and research this topic to your own satisfaction, but just based on its bee toxicity, I avoid it.

Dawn


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Oh my. I don't want to have a toxic plant. I got a pack of Caster beans last year but was afraid to plant them for the same reason.

My neighbor across the street has been putting up a short run of privacy fence this morning and it really looks nice. Maybe I will just hold off on the planting until I can put a fence up. His just goes from his house to his property line and ties to a neighbors chainlink on the side, so it's only a about four sections and a gate. I'm just not ready to spend the dollars on a fence right now because in our case it would be a lot of fencing.


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I don't know how it would work with your lateral lines, but I have a type of Euonymous I first bought 35 years ago and planted right in front of a porch on my dad's property. That little cabin is now storage and the plants in front of the porch are 15ft tall--despite Dad cutting them down to 3 ft at least twice. I have since planted them on a property line where I wanted them to grow that tall but unfortunately they are very tasty to the neighbor's cattle and they reach over the fence to trim them down. Still they are really tough, drought and flood tolerant and grow fast. And they are evergreen. When you come I have a pot full you can have if you want them.


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Dorothy I will take you up on that offer. I actually have 3 plants of some type of Enonymous that I started from root cuttings a few years ago. I actually managed to get four to root fairly successfully but one died after going into the ground. Now it looks odd because, naturally, it wouldn't be one of the ones at the end that died and they were in a row. The three that are left look very healthy but are only a couple of feet tall. They only get morning sun and I suspect that is why they haven't grown much. The plant I took the cuttings from was about four feet tall, but I don't know how old it was or if it had been cut back. I have been considering moving these anyway, but I don't know if this one would grow tall enough to solve my problem. Since you know that yours get tall I will be happy to get them. Thanks. We can probably come down in a couple of weeks. Right now I am planting like mad.

I don't know much about stem cuttings so this was just an experiment anyway. Now I am encouraged and would like to start some other things.


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One shrub I would suggest is Abelia. 'Edward Goucher' is a good one with pink flowers summer to fall. They attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Nice foliage, easy to grow, semi-evergreen, fragrant. I don't have one......yet, but I have friends that do and they love them. They get about 4-5' tall and wide.

Susan


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That's how I got my starts. Several years ago about this time of the year, Dad pruned the bushes and I picked up the newgrowth whips and brought them home as "greenery" in a vase of Iris. They still looked good after the iris were gone, so I replaced the water and kept them around. To my surprise they rooted right in the water. It was a dark colored vase which may have helped them root. I have since started a few by dipping in rooting hormone and planting in potting mix. (I have also tried this several times with a holly hedge of unknown variety with no success at all.) In addition to the pot, we can trim some whips off my shrubs and send them home with you in water.


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RE: All of them

Dorothy, That sounds like fun. Now if I could just borrow your green thumb and about 2,000 square feet of your garden....


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RE: All of them

Wow, Dawn, I never would have thought to look for that. I see it described as toxic to some livestock, but many plants have defense mechanisms like that so I didn't think anything of it. After googling for a few minutes, I see so many common plants are considered toxic to bees, from Rhododendrons to Moonflowers. Do you have a source where you've found a comprehensive list? It's difficult to sort out legit research from Wikipedia hysteria.


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RE: All of them

I did it. I'm guilty. I was wrong but I'm enjoying it. While sitting idle in my vehicle in the drive through of a local taco shop I stole some new growth from their untrimmed shrubs, dipped it in willow water, let them sit damp and now they're sprouting. Too bad I don't know what they are.


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