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A flowering vine for the shade?

Posted by stillh20gardenjunkie 7 (My Page) on
Wed, Apr 19, 06 at 17:33

I am new to this formum (which I was thrilled to find) and frankly, new to gardening (which I am addicted to.) I am looking for a flowering vine that does well in part sun. The gardening experts at Lowe's assured me the Bower Vine (Pandorea Jasminoides) would do fine. I have been searching online for helpful tips, and have discovered lots of info from our more tropical neighbors (Mississippi, California, and Arizona.) I suppose I am somewhat committed to giving it a try, but I would sure be interested to hear if anyone has experience with this vine. Anything I must know before planting? Am I a fool to give it a go?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

I don't know that one... But in shade you can do climbing hydrangea. In part sun I am sure there are multiple clematis varieties that would do well. I imagine one of our fellow gardeners could suggest one specifically, since I don't know the types that well. Also, is this to grow on a fence, a wall, a trellis(sp?)? Where it is growing will factor in...
Dustin


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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

Dustin,
Thanks for your response. The Bower Vine has delicate pastel pink flowers with burgandy throats. I have to admit it was an easy sell. I would love to make clematis work, but I have been kind of scared off by clematis nay-sayers...aren't clematis somewhat finicky? I know they need "warm faces, cool feet" but I am otherwise unfamiliar with the kind of care they require. They certainly are beautiful though. Is the hydrangea the way to go?

Our house faces the west, with a huge (as in rainforest huge) sycamore right in the middle of our yard. Makes for a wonderfully cool place to sit in the summertime, but a lousy place for sun-loving flowers. There is an very empty, lonely looking spot right next to the porch that really needs something with a good deal of height. I have a large container, with a 5 ft metal tuteur/obelisk that I was planning on using to train an easy-to-grow, flowering vine. I am only marginally optimistic that this will be possible. The little spot it will go in receives sun through the leaves from 2-5 and direct light from 5 until sundown.

Thanks again for your input, I will look into the hydrangea option.
Erin


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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

The only problem with the climbing hydrangea (petiolaris) is that it takes a few years to really get going. Slow to start. If you have time and patience, that's great. I have several clematis in my backyard that do great. I also have morning glories that absolutely insist on reseeding every year. One clematis, Sweet Autumn, flowers, as the name indicates in late summer to fall, and is very, very fragrant. It is a bit rampant. There are lots and lots of clematis varieties that do well in partial shade, but if you are looking at deep shade, that's another story. There are lots of non-flowering vines for those situations, but not too many that will flower in deep shade.

Carolina jessamine might do well because it would probably bloom before the deciduous trees leaf out. It has yellow blooms, and blooms in early spring. I have a new one that I think I'm really going to like which is supposedly good for part sun/part shade, which is jasminum x stephanense. It is a fragrant pink blooming vine. Has little pink trumpet shaped flowers, blooming in clusters, and the hummingbirds are supposed to be attracted to it as well. It blooms in late spring/early summer, and sporadically throughout the remaining season. I doubt you will find it locally - maybe TLC or Marcums or Satterlee's.

If you get a clematis, get one in a gallon pot at least. Otherwise, you will need to pot a small one into a gallon pot for a year at least before you plant it out. Yes, they do like to have cool roots. I just plant other things around the base, or cover them well with mulch, rocks, or broken pottery. Look at the Clematis forum if you're interested in getting a clematis. They can recommend some for a beginner.
Susan


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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

The Bower Vine is hardy for zones 9 and 10.. so you might want to consider that it isn't a perennial here. I personally wouldn't plant it because of that alone. I would do the Carolina Jasmine or climbing hydrangia. They are really beautiful even if they are a slow grower.
Have fun.

Karen


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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

Thank you for your advice. I think I fell victim to my own curiosity re: the Bower Vine. I planted it six weeks ago and it has grown wonderfully...no blooms though. The vine is planted in a large container with a tuteur, so I assumed even the hardiest vines wouldn't survive the winter. If nothing else it could winter indoors assuming it shows itself worthy!

If I give it another go next year I will definitely look into a shade tolerant clematis. I have become a bit of a vine nut and planted two clematis plants (bought from a nursery) and about 2 dozen morning glories/cardinal vines (from seed.) I can't remember exactly how big the clematis containers were...maybe just 8" pots?...They are already in the ground. I mulched them with pecan hulls...do you have any specific advice for helping them survive? Is it standard procedure to reseed MG vines in zone 7? I was really looking forward to seeing them come to life again next summer. Maybe I should replace those with the climbing hydrangea?

thanks again,
Erin


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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

Oh, you'll see the Morning Glory come to life next year, alright, and bring lots of their siblings! The Sweet Autumn Clematis is a great climber. It is not as fussy as the large-flowered Clematis, but it gets really big, and likes sun. However, I have seen it growing on the edge of the forest where it gets a good deal of shade also, so you might give it a try.

Another nice flowering climbing vine is Black Eyed Suzan Vine. It will also reseed, but likes sun. A flowering vine for shade is difficult to come by with the exceptions mentioned by the other gardeners here, as far as I know. Good luck with your "experiment" - sometimes the search is the most fun!


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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

I thought of another couple vines that would do well in partial sun/shade, and those are the Silver Lace Vine and the honeysuckle 'Dropmore Scarlet' which is not invasive and has red blooms on it, that the hummingbirds love.

Susan


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RE: A flowering vine for the shade?

whew...I am glad to hear the MG's will come back next year. I loved some of the new suggestions. My sister's name is Susan, so I've always been a little partial to Black Eyed Suzans. What is it about vines anyway?...I would plant a dozen tomorrow if I had the time. I am going to print this discussion to keep for future reference...this forum is so helpful.

Speaking of the fun of experimenting, I had a bit of thrill last week when I discovered the Bower Vine had bloomed! The flowers were soooo pretty...pale pink, burgandy throats (just as planned.) The plant seems extremely happy...it is absolutely thriving. I have to say it felt like a real victory. I dragged my mom out to see it and DH tried to be supportive with his blank stare and grunt (God love him.) So it is fun to have other gardening junkies to share my success with.

thanks again for your help,
Erin


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