Return to the Oklahoma Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Wildflower ID?

Posted by Pallida Zone 7b (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 26, 11 at 17:28

Found this neat wildflower growing in full sun, in horrible soil, with zilch moisture. Surprised me, since the wildflowers have been extremely scarce this year.........

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Jeanie


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Is this it?

Here is a link that might be useful: ruella


 o
RE: better example

This has more information good and bad. It grows along my long wild country driveway. That is a good place for it. I enjoy it on the way to the mailbox.

Here is a link that might be useful: wild petunia


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Shoot! It's not even a REAL Petunia, or my little crawly friends could really help keep it from becoming invasive. LOL!


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?/two

That is probably what it is. It is really quite pretty. I would be hesitant to plant seeds in a bed where I didn't want it taking over, but in a problem area with concrete soil, it could be a blessing! Thanks for info.

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Pallida,

Most likely your plant is Ruellia humilis. I have these growing in my garden intentionally as they are a host plant for the beautiful Buckeye butterflies. So far mine have been well behaved. I do have a nice colony, but they haven't spread beyond their little group.

On the other hand, the Mexican Petunia or Ruellia brittoniana is becoming a pest. I planted this plant and had a heck of a time getting rid of it. Check the leaves. The Mexican Petunia has long thin strap like leaves and is usually tall. The native wild petunia has small hairy leaves and looks like the link below. The flowers are similar on both plants.

Here is a link that might be useful: Native wild petunia


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?Three

I think it would be the native wild Petunia, as it looks just like the link pic. and is only about 8" tall. I'll try to get some seeds when it finishes it's blooming cycle. Thanks.........

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Jeanie, if you aren't able to collect seeds, Prairie Moon has them for a reasonable price. Although they will self-seed, I've had difficulty collecting the seeds.

I have the shorter, pinkish Ruellia humilis (like your picture) planted in front of the taller, purple R. brittoniana and it's a really pretty display.

Here is a link that might be useful: Wild Petunia


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Helenh, Butterflymomok, Tulsarose:
Thank you, so much, for the links and info! I checked on the little wildflower this AM, and it has, indeed, already faded and does have the exact appearance of the description in the links of Ruellia Humilis. If unable to catch seed pods before they explode all over the place, at least I know Prairie Moon carries them. I love wildflowers, but this year there have been so few that it startled me to find this pretty little thing growing in such adverse conditions, especially since I had never seen it before. Of course, that is why the wild plants are so interesting, managing to survive in horrible conditions on roadsides, in ditches, in fields and tucked into rocks on hillsides! I have been switching my flower beds to cacti, succulents and native perennials this Summer, because I'm tired of fighting to keep my English Cottage theme going. There is no guarantee that this isn't going to be the weather pattern for years to come. Why fight it?! Besides, I LIKE the clean, SW look. Cactusgarden in OKC got me started on the theme switch. She is very knowledgable and has lots of experience in this area. Again, thank you for your follow ups, and, oh yes, for discussing gardening facts and not farm reports!

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Hi Jeanie,

If your soil is bad outside of your garden area, that would be a good one to try to naturalize and encourage in the wilder areas of your property. Thelosperma is another that needs no watering and naturalizes well too. It would reseed too aggressively in a moist garden but on a dry piece of land, that would be its good quality. Anything like that you see growing and blooming this year would be a good one to collect seeds and scatter about in the transition zone. I'd love to hear what you have growing there because I get the feeling you are close to the Arbuckle Mts. and there are a lot of interesting natives around there. Its a good collection area. Maybe when the weather normalizes we can try to ID some as they bloom. That would be fun. I am still looking for Plains Greasebush. You might have it there.

If you want to read about interesting plants (besides the typical bedding plants) and native plants, the Texas Forum is the place to go. Texans are very interested in native plants and have a lot of interesting posts to read, I have learned a lot there. I have nearly given up on the Oklahoma Forum. For more than two years, I have checked in from time to time to see if its changed but its almost entirely devoted to farm subjects such as chickens and mostly vegetables. I always wonder if other gardeners do the same because I know there are many people living in Oklahoma who are interested in a wider range of gardening subjects. I tried posting here but do not fit in very well as a gardener because I am not at all interested in okra, tomatoes, squash, worms, chickens and weather reports so I went south.


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?Two

Cactusgarden,
Checked out Thelosperma and really like it. It reminds me of Threadleaf Coreopsis. This plus the Ruellia Humilis, plus Ratibida, plus Castilleja would make a really pretty little "wild area" in my clay/caliche soil! Might have to order seeds from Prairie Moon, as practically NONE of these wildflowers bloomed on my property this year. That is why stumbling on to the Ruellia Humilis surprised me. Yes, I live very close to the Arbuckles. Hopefully we have an Autumn with cooler Temps. and don't jump right into Winter, so can do some exploring in "them thar hills!". If this weather pattern is going to be with us for a number of years, there will be a LOT of people going South, so look over your shoulder; Texas forum, here I come!

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

A good plant for your caliche area is the mountain pinks, antelope horn milkweed. I live on Caliche and they bloomed this spring for me in Texas and we had no winter rains and then no summer rains. Nothing else bloomed but the antelope horn milk weed. We had a few blackfoot daisies. I think you would also like damianita. It can stand up to dry conditions and is insanely fragrant when you crush the foliage.. It likes a bit of rain in the spring to set it off but it will live and bloom another year if it doesn't get it. Another plant that just plain loves the white caliche is silphium albiflorum AKA white flowered rosinweed. Old field soldago takes caliche and dryness, so does liatris muncranata. I am missing many of my regular flowers. Things are burnt crispy out there. I live in Central Texas, rugged caliche limestone hills. It sounds like your country, but my limestone is most likely newer than yours. I love my natives.


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Mara,
Thank you for the plant suggestions. They sound great. As I said, I will probably have to rely on seed companies like Prairie Moon to get started, especially with these that I am not familiar with. Thankfully, there's hope for gardening in horrible conditions such as mine. I live on a hot, dry, windy, shadeless hill with the world's worst soil.

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Prairie Moon has great seeds and they are reasonable. I bought a lot of seeds from them when I was growing natives to sell at Farmer's Mkt. But, I'm not selling anymore due to health. Prairie Moon has a great catalog that they will send you free that has directions for growing the seeds. It's the best source for seed germination that I have found.

I'm a flower girl myself, as is Susanlynne. Haven't seen her on here lately. We just need to be more vocal! I hang out on the Buttefly Forum most of the time.

Sandy


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

I do find that adding sand , pea gravel and compost is a good thing for caliche. I also bring in a Xeric mix from a local bulk soil guy. Oh I forgot to mention, (there are so many) Oenotherae speciosa, Oenothera macrocarpa, salvia farenacia, Salvia regla,salvia gregii,Plox pilosi, Calirhoe involcrata, Craig lily (echiandia texensis), calylophus berlandieri (any of this family),zexmania, cut leaf daisy, skeleton leaf daisy, Heteratheca villoussa, scutelleria drummundi, There are many many.

Think xeric when it comes to your shrubs, Like Yuccas, agaves,hesperalo, dasylition, Fragrant mimosa, Flameleaf sumac, western redbuds.

I had a book about gardening in difficult soils that was a great help. But choice of plant is the most important thing and soil ammendments will please any plant. Also terracing and creating hollows to slow down your progress of water and the ability to hold back topsoil. I garden on a caliche hill also . I have some shade in places and other soil types in other areas.

I recommend the LBJ wildflower research sight below. I Use them for research all the time. I do find that seed collecting in Fall is the best way to get color and ease of gardening.

Here is a link that might be useful: LBJ wildflower Center


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Native Amderican Seed (seedsource dot com) is also a great source for native plants. They mainly focus on central Texa so you might have to research the cold tolerance on some things but most that work in TX should work in OK as well I think.

Teri


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?/Sunday

Just got in from church and am reading all these great suggestions for plants and the two seed companies, Prairie Moon and Native American Seed. I DO have one other problem other than bad, bad soil. I have ravenous deer and rabbits who will gnosh things right to the ground, which means I will have to amend the soil AND read up on critter-resistant plants. Tain't easy gardening on my hill! The deer destroyed my beautiful Hemerocallis and Roses by nipping off the buds before they could open this Spring. The rabbits love Callirhoe, Shasta Daisies and Sedums. SO, I have ripped out all roses, most daylilies, shastas, callirhoe and the rabbits literally ate ALL the Sedums! Guess I had better order a very informative catalog. I know HCG catalog lists zones, drought tolerance and critter proof plants. Thank all of you! I KNEW there were some gardeners out there who discussed flower gardening and NOT toms, peppers, squash, okra, chickens, etc.! I have no problem with farming, but aren't there forums for veggie growers? I was thinking more in terms of Gertrude Jekyll and Penelope Hobhouse or Victory Gardening. I have to find some new heroes, though, who are into Xeric Gardening! HA..........

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

What is cool about Native American seed company is that they tell you in the graph on each seed if it will grow in Caliche and what the water requirements of the plant is. oh, and Check out my seed list. I have a lot.


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Please do be more vocal. I love all the active veggie/ farm posts but I also have wildflower gardens! I am really just getting serious about gardening, I recently finished school and finally have time. So far I have purple cone flower, rudbeckia, and Prairie verbena ( super easy to grow here in NE ok) plus all the wild things on my three acres that I can convince my husband not to mow down. For example prairie partridge, some (very contained) honeysuckle, rosa multiflora, blackberries...on and on. I am also glad to see everyone advocating seed companies, it is so hard to convince folks to NOT go out and dig up wildflowers. It's best to let the population exist where it is and just try to spread it with seed to your garden. Anyway I'm rambling here I just wanted you all to know I enjoyed this thread and the great links!
Amanda


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

No, no. Don't dig. Collect seeds. I just KNEW there were more flower people out there growing flowers, especially forbs! With this heat, the natives are the heroes......

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

We are here kind of nibbling around in between forums, never finding a good home.

We did not get your winter and spring rains here in Texas so even the natives are stressed to the max. I have had many go dormant, not grow this year at all, and some of my large native perennials have died, ones that are indigenous in Arizona and the Big Bend. It is BAD out there. I only hope that they will return with the rains. I will be there with my seeds when they do. I need to preface that I live on acreage and rainwater so I do not water AT ALL, my ornamental/wildflowers are on their own, unfortunately.

I collect seeds all the time. The seed companies collect from ranches in different areas, Some grow them, but not all. I know that NAS co. collects from ranches around the state of Texas because I know a ranch down my road that they have contracted with for a grass & forbe mix.

I think the act of collecting seeds gives me a purpose to be in the outdoors and I am more aware of my surroundings. I am like an animal with seeds in my hair, or the wind spreading seeds onto my land. When I collect I collect from healthy populations and grow plants that are mostly not endangered. I never dig up wildflowers. It is so easy to get a few seeds. Learning to Identifiy them might take a few years. I have been known to tag things and come back later. Wildflower books are not set up for the seed collector. They do not show what seed pods look like in the fall.

I have been noticing this week that "snow on the mountain" (ludicrous name if there ever was one blooming in 111F), a Euforbia, is alive and blooming up a storm on our desicated hills and everything else is turning to dust or spontaneously combusting. I like that stuff but one needs an area to let it do justice. It looks great in the wild but often looks like a scraggly awkward form as a single plant in a garden.

You have some gorgious wildflowers up in OK that I am wishing to add, a sand lilly.
As for seed companies:
I like Plants of the Southwest
http://www.plantsofthesouthwest.com/
If he is still open , Reid lewis
http://www.vvm.com/~reid/seeds.htm

And a new favorite, Southwestern Native Seeds for experimenting with Arizona and NM seeds
and for the odd ones, They do business a little oddly. They treasure their privacy. it is with with checks and no phone # so one has to trust them.

Here is a link that might be useful: Southwestern Native Seeds


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

I have been off line for awhile due to computer issues which have hopefully been resolved now.

You echo my sentiments exactly, altho I do occasionally have questions about veggie gardening. The Texas forum in a word, is FANTASTIC! And, of course, so is the Butterfly forum. We do discuss natives frequently on the BFF, because most butterflies and moths are attracted to, and use, natives as larval host plants and nectar sources.

The "original" Oklahoma Gardening forum was outstanding as far as growing natives and ornamentals. Over the last 2 or 3 years it has evolved into a vegegeble gardening/weather forecasting setting. Weather forecasting I can certainly do without since I am literate and can either read or watch TV reports. So, it's kind of insulting to me that I am given weather forecasts on a gardening forum. As a native plant enthusiast and ornamental gardener, I am sorely disappointed in the trend of the forum and the clickishness (is that a word?) that has developed between many of the members. I have since graduated from high school.

As to seeds and seed descriptions, I think that Prairie Moon shows images of seed pods and seeds as well. I will attach a link as an example and I grow this specific plant known as Wingstem, or Actinomeris alternifolia, which I think has since been reclassified as Verbesina alternifolia. They also provide germination codes which is very helpful, especially for those difficult seeds. I would never have known about semi-parasitic plants and how to sow the seeds had it not been for them. (I grew Gerardia tenuifolium from seed and it is a semi-parasitic plant on grasses). So paying strict attention to the codes can help you avoid problem issues. They also recently added range maps to their individual seed descriptions as well.

Mara, I think I got my Flame Acanthus seeds from you, and in their second year, they are 4' tall and wide, and blooming profusely!

I utilize natives a lot but in my limited city yard space I don't have as many as I would like. Fringed Puccoon, or Lithospermum incisum, is another native I would love to grow that is supposed to be very drought tolerant.

Susan

Here is a link that might be useful: Example from Prairie Moon website


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Hi, Susan,
Wow! It is good to hear from you. Glad to know your PC is up and running , again. Ditto, on everything you said. I came "on board" GW only about 7 mos. ago and became quickly disenchanted when I realized the members seemed to be a "tight-knitted" group of "farmers", not gardeners of ornamentals, natives, perennials and butterfly and humming bird interests. After struggling to "fit in", I have simply given up on posting here and now seek out the Texas, Arizona and Butterfly forums. I have included Arizona, since this Summer of temps. and drought. I truly do wish the OKGW forum would actually swing around and become a "GARDEN FORUM". As I said earlier, I have nothing against farming, but there are forums for that. Thanks for the link. See you on BFF.

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

I'm interested in a lot of kinds of gardening and I'm glad that there is a lot of variety in the Okla forum, even if some areas are smaller than others. I've learned a lot from the vegetable gardeners that I wouldn't have known from the general gardening forum. Gardening of any kind in Okla involves a lot of special knowledge and I'm glad to hear from anyone who has faced these problems and can help me before I run into them. I thank the vegetable gardeners for Wilhite Seed and Gourmet Seeds and others and for the names of varieties that do well here. I thank everyone for the weather comparisons because it makes me feel like I'm not alone with my .4 inches of rain all summer.

I thank you, Jeanie, for Prairie Moon Nursery. I had never heard of them before, but after you mentioned them I found 6 types of seeds I would like to have. I just placed an order a few minutes age, so I can sow the seeds this fall. Last year, I started to try to recreate an area of wildflowers that we had at the last house. It wasn't planted, just happened naturally on a sandstone slope and it was beautiful. I've bought a lot of wildflower seeds and plants over the years, but nothing has turned out as pretty. It's been so dry at our house that the plants I had started in the new area didn't even sprout, so I may have to start over again. I don't think that there were many seeds scattered from those plants to count on them lasting until next year. One plant that I would love to have is Prairie Sabatia - Sabitia compestre. If anyone knows where to get some seeds, I would love to know.

Also, my main interest is in fragrant plants.

Loretta


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Thanks, Jeanie! I believe in what goes around, comes around, so hope the trend changes in the future. The Texas Gardening forum is a great one! I'll have to check out the Arizona. I do check the Natives Forum often as well, and, of course, the Butterfly Gardening Forum.

Susan


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Loretta,

We have prairie sabatia in our pastures and sometimes even in the front yard under the pecan tree, which has better soil than the pastures. I don't know that my meadow pinks survived long enough this year to set seed, but I can collect seed for you next year if they bloom next year.

Most of the wildflowers here likely burned up before they could set seed this year, so I think I'll probably sow some wildflower seeds this fall as well if any moisture seems likely to fall.

Dawn


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Loretta,
Actually, I first heard of Prairie Moon from Susanlynne. There are some great seed companies, but I am mostly interested in "natives", so this is a really good one.
I, too, love Lavender and fragrant plants, but where I live prohibits growing many of them. Have you checked out High Country Gardens' offerings of all the different kinds of Lavender? I am curious about the Lavender Farms in Oklahoma. Would be a great week-end trip to visit one of them, at least until frost.
Dawn's right about the wildflowers. Practically none appeared this year and for the few "toughies" that did, probably didn't have time to set seed before burning to a crisp in the heat. I sure hope we don't have another
Summer of triple digits facing us next year. I miss the pretty natives dotting the road sides.

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Dawn, I would love for you to save me some seeds next year, if you can. I'm hoping that we get actual wildflower bloom next summer. One of the lakes here usually has a very pretty display of wildflowers, but this summer I didn't see any at all. I've googled prairie sabatia but never found any source. I guess they sell more of the larger, showier types so they don't bother with the smaller things.

Jeanie, I've never ordered lavender from High Country. We used to go to New Mexico a lot and I've bought natives from their retail store and from Plants of the Southwest. We've been to the lavender farm near Apache, I believe, a few years ago. That year, they had lost almost all of their display plants to flood the winter before, but they had plants to sell, so of course, I had to buy some. I think they have their display garden going good again, although I don't know what this summer has done to it. They had the prettiest peacocks there when we went.

Susanlynne, I owe you thanks, too, for Prairie Moon. I ordered bush morning glory, dotted blazing star, Missouri evening primrose and prairie blue-eyed grass for my recreated bed. I've collected some seeds locally and had them flower a little last year, but I may have to do it all again after this heat.

Loretta


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Ah drat. Thank you all for these posts and pictures. I'm afraid I know what is the pretty volunteer my mil and I have been sporadically trying to identify-- Mexican petunia. It has seeded one plantling in about three years in a watered, shaded flower bed, so might that be enough to hope it is a less invasive strain of the plant? If memory serves, there is one?


 o
RE: Wildflowers of Oklahoma

Thank you, EVERYONE, for your "follow-ups" on wildflowers! My faith is being restored! HA. Have stumbled across a website that is unbelievable, if you are interested in wildflower pix and ID. Google (Richard Allen Galleries) and then click on wildflowers of Oklahoma by Richard Allen. This photographer, in alphabetical order lists almost every wildflower I ever heard of, and then some, with beautiful close-up pix, info and where he took the picture and, yes, the Prairie Sabatia is included.
As to the Mexican Petunia, I understand it IS invasive, but that the little, short Oklahoma ruellia is not and easily controlled.
Check out the Sand Lily. I've fallen in love, again. The info with these pics is "right on", and some of these plants I would NOT want among my wildflowers. It helps to know which ones to avoid..........

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

OH god, I saw that website and I really want to grow some sand lilies. I have frilled puccoon growing on my land . They are a plant that is very sporadic. There is never a "Showing " of them. They also, what I hear have two kind of seed. I think one is not a true seed. They do not make many seeds. I have not figured them out yet. They come and go. I actually see them more on wet years than dry years. They were a no show this year. They are one of the first to bloom in the spring. I do like to discover them on my walks.

I wander here from the Texas forum. I like them but I found that the Oklahoma forum was very refreshing because I could feel that they were very effected by THE WEATHER, But like the weather, it got tiring. The fire advise was great. Most of the Texas forum were ornamental gardeners watering their gardens in on a city watering system. During this drought, there is a huge divide between those that live where water comes unquestioningly out of a faucet and those that live on land. There are watering restrictions in place, and they are there every year in most cities in Texas. Restrictions can be gotten around. I don't have water. What I hear is that many in the OK forum are seriously effected. My Natives are mostly dead or dormant except for my flame acanthus. I am trucking water in and nothing gets water. Everything is burnt. On the Texas form, I was irritated by pictures of green lush plants in lush gardens exibbited as hardy water wise plants when I know that they died a while back in my yard. I suspect that If you have a green garden here this year, you have been cheating on your watering. It is also true that since my garden, veg garden have died, I am in withrawal and becoming b!tchy and the Vegetable talk is now like fingernails on a chalkboard also. I should not complain being a visiter and all. (Hey , Texas was hotter that OK last month).

Every Native I put out this year died. I am still collecting seed and scared to start them with the La Nina starting up again. I was just missed by the 7000 acre Pedernales Bend fire this weekend. I am spending all my time in defensive gardening. I am cutting all my natives to the ground that are anywhere under the oak trees by the house. Most are dried twigs anyway.There go the flame acantha, alive and well. If anyone find a native source of Sand lilly or find out what they like. I am all ears.

I think that Natives are a regional affair and belong in regional forums. I have been left feeling like an outsider on the natives forum. The natives of New England, North Carolina, Florida, and the PNW do not do not help me. I am glad people are doing them but they die in my yard. Even many northern and midwestern prairie plants don't make it here because of extended heat and dryness issues. Most gardeners on the SW and arizona forums are suburban irrigators. I skim through many forums and hope that I get something that I can use and contribute something that others can use.


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?/Sand Lily

Mara, The Sand Lily pic was taken around Vici, OK. which is a tiny little town in far NW OK. I would think that is pretty rugged territory.
If your FP ever yields an abundance of seeds, please let me know.
I did not see the little wild petunia or clammyweed on his list, but who knows how many wildflowers OK grows?!

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

I have a lot of clammyweed seed


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Clammyweed, I've got. Really interested in:
1. Sand Lily
2. Frilled Puccoon
3. Dotted Mint (Monarda Punctata)
4. White Prairie Clover
5. Prairie Smoke (Geum Triflorum). This one I'm not sure of, because what I read about it says "full sun/part shade, moderately moist" which
means it probably would not survive my location, but sure like the look
of it!
6. Echinacea Pallida. This one I had, but seems to have fallen prey to
either the heat or rabbits.

Would like some feed-back on Prairie Smoke, if anyone has had experience growing it.

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Is Frilled Puccoon the same as Fringed Puccoon?

The Prairie Smoke is a gorgeous plant. I would love to have a field of them. Can you imagine?

The Flame Acanthus is very pretty. I love that the foliage stays nice all summer in this drought, too. It just keeps on trucking no matter what. I wonder how it will do in a wet year - like we get a lot of those. 2007 was the only one I recall ever.

I have a new Salvia darcyi and it is bloomin' like crazy this year - not a native, but tolerate heat and drought pretty well. Well, except for Black & Blue, which likes its regular watering.

I am having such a horrible problem with Southern Pink Moth this year, that I almost want to give up on them, though. They really cause a lot of damage, and the blooms get eaten, too. I dare not spray due to my "butterfly friendly" environment. They seem to have taken up residence in my garden, and spraying or sprinkling BT is not an option. Black & Blue they adore, and they have also taken a loving to 'Lady in Red'. So far, they have not eaten much of S. darcyi, so maybe they don't prefer it.

I haven't been able to water as much as I would like this past month or so due to daughter's illness. Still, all has survived. The Verbesina encelioides has marched on thru the drought. I keep hoping for Bordered Patch butterflies, but have barely had any butterflies this year. The Flame Acanthus is host to the Texan Crescent butterfly, but none of those this year either. My natives that really suffer without water and the extreme heat are False Nettle aka Boehmeria cylindrica (for the Red Admirals), Ptelea trifoliata, a native small tree, host for Giant Swallowtails, my new plants, Dooryard Plantain or Plantago major (Buckeyes), Verbesina alternifolia or Wingstem, Hibiscus coccineus, Buttonbush or Cephalanthus occidentalis, and Liriodendron tulipifera. or Tulip Tree, Wild Cherry tree (Prunus serotina), and Lindera benzoin or Spicebush, which completely died.

Some of these most folks would not plant, so I don't often mention them as suggested natives to grow. However, they are butterfly and/or moth nectar and host plants that I continue to struggle with. The Spicebush is one I have attempted 3 times now, and probably will not try again. But other members of this family (Lauraceae) are difficult, too, so there is not really a good alternative.

Is anyone planning to do any fall plantings?

Susan


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Oops! My boo-boo. It IS Fringed Puccoon.
I really would like to try Prairie Smoke, but it's Southernmost limit is Z6 and needs constant moisture, which knocks me completely out of the ballpark.
You are growing some great butterfly/hummer plants. OKC has received
more rain than "Little Sahara" down here in South Central OK, and we are, usually, a little hotter. I have been changing my beds to cacti, succulents and VERY drought-hardy perennials. Tired of fighting the elements.

I've had practically NO butterflies this season. A couple of pretty
Swallowtails last Spring, and actually saw a beautiful Monarch a couple of
days ago. No HB moths, no garden spiders, and the red ants hide in their volcanoes during the heat of the day. The heat has really taken it's toll this year on plants and "critters" alike. Here's hoping we get some
moisture this Winter!
I've planted a few perennial seeds, but have post-poned planting any plants or shrubs to see what future weather has in store for us.

Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

Jeanie, do you grow the native Datura wrightii? It is one tough, drought tolerant plant. It starts blooming around July, and has flushes of blooms. It attracts many of the hummingbird moths. If you are able to go outside around dusk, or dawn, you will see them feeding on the flowers, dipping their entire bodies into the flowers to get the nectar. They have a very long proboscus, about 4-5 inches. There are several species of moths that nectar on them, and the Tobacco Hornworm use them for a larval host. This plant gets virtually no water.

Another really rugged plant that the butterflies nectar on is Helianthus maximiliani, or Maximillian Sunflower. It is a perennial sunflower and gets quite large, if one has space to give it. I love the grey-green rough foliage and it flowers up and down the stems.

Another plant that has weathered the heat and drought this year is Passiflora incarnata. But it is a thug in the garden, so you have to really want butterflies, e.g., the Gulf Fritillary and the Variegated Fritillary to grow it.

All plants, of course, need regular watering to become established.

This year, I got a new Gaillardia suavis, or Perfume Balls. It is a heat and drought tolerant plant. The flowers are pretty much rayless, but it makes up for lack of aesthetic in the fragrance. The foliage is basal. I can't wait till I have a nice patch of this.

I am finally beginning to see Monarchs and hope I get some eggs!

Susan


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?/2

Susan,
No, don't grow the Native Datura. In the Spring, planted the seeds of a beautiful two-toned purple, which sprouted but never did take off and grow. Think just too hot and dry, even though I was watering.
Also, started some giant sunflowers, but something ate the new sprouts.
I have to deal with bad soil, heat, drought, high wind and "critters". Rabbits even ate some cactus pads that were more or less spineless! Deer ate my rosebuds and hemerocallis buds. Poor things are hungry and eating anything they can find. I am now paying very close attention to what I plant. Haven't seen deer for a couple of mos., but rabbits are still around. Did you plant seeds or plants of the Perfume Balls? Gaillardia is one thing that has done well for me, and the "critters", for whatever the reason, have avoided them. Guess the cooler temps. are bringing out the Monarchs. Won't be much longer til the BF and HB will disappear til next Spring. Always makes me sad, but I know it is the natural life cycle for them.
By the way, go to YouTube and download "My Baby Hummingbird". It is an adorable clip!

Jeanie


Jeanie


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

I moved my huge native datura this year. I might have killed it. We will see. This summer has been murder. I needed to give my other plants a chance. It would not stay in it place and would take over everything.


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

I dunno, Mara. I have dug in and around mine. The roots are substantial, resembling rhizomes or tap roots. It never winced a bit from having its roots cut and disturbed. I think it will probably be fine.

Jeanie, I purchased my plant Bustani. I can save seed for next year. It didn't have too many seeds this year. Will try to locate the hummer clip you mention.

Susan


 o
RE: Wildflower ID?

I collected mine from an abandoned homestead. The roots were huge. I had moved it out from down town and the plant had definitely SPREAD OUT . The roots ran parallel to the ground for a long distance. I got as much as I could out and then I had plants coming up from root remnants. I dug those up too.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Oklahoma Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here