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Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Posted by macmex 6b (My Page) on
Tue, Sep 22, 09 at 16:27

Hey folks,

We're harvesting Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins now, and so far, we're impressed! Just have to cut one and learn about the flavor and texture. But the harvest is truly impressive. The first three squash we picked weighed 15 lb each, on the dot. I picked three more this morning, and they may weigh in a hair lighter.

We received this seed from Rodger Winn, a GW member and also member of The Southern Seeds Legacy with Univ. of GA. Rodger tells me that this is the traditional pumpkin, grown in or on the edges of cornfields, in that part of the Appalachians. He said that they come in all different shapes. Ours have all been different “pumpkin shapes,” long or short. Some have more noticeable ridges than others. All ripen to a dark beige.
Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin Vines
Picture taken in August

I planted about 8 plants, in four hills, and as you can see in the picture, they really took that garden over. But we're happy. They had no pest problems and never even hinted at wilting during our hottest and driest part of the summer. Unless they have terrible quality, this one is a definite keeper. I estimate that we will harvest a minimum of 12-15 large pumpkins.

Our old standby, Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin, didn't do nearly as well this year. But that may have had something to do with having planted it in a couple of feet of fairly rotten barn scrapings and manure. WBPP got hit big time with squash bugs, when the weather turned damp.

George
Tahlequah, OK

2 Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins
First two pumpkins harvested

3 Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins
Harvest from 9/22/09


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George
You are SUCH A GARDENER! Those really look good. I'm taking notes on your garden varieties-and lore.

Barbara


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

If the quality turns out to be incredible will you have seed to share?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, you could be describing the L.I. Cheese squash. The vines aren't variegated though and the fruit is flatter. I will be interested in hearing how you think this one compares to L.I. Cheese.

I am just now getting squash bugs on the fruits. Usually I am overrun with them, but not this year.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I don't believe this is Long Island Cheese. Though I haven't grown that one, I've seen it many times. Long Island Cheese is... well, cheese shaped. But somewhere down the line all moschatas are probably descended from some common ancestry.

I did a ton of hand pollinations on this one, being careful to take male flowers from as many different vines as possible, to ensure as much genetics as possible. I intend to take the seed from each hand pollinated squash and mix them all together. Then, I'll take seed samples out of that big batch, so those who get seed also get the most diversity possible. So, Dorothy, to answer your question, I plan on having A LOT of seed to share.

If you look closely you'll notice that one of the pumpkins in each photo has a letter p etched into its skin. Those are marked as "pure/hand pollinated."

One, in the second picture has a large "x" etched into the skin. That was an experimental cross between this squash and Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin. I'll keep some of that seed and try growing it out to see what the cross is like.

Presently I'm picking a couple of these a day. I just like to extend the pleasure. I have found a couple "lunkers" hiding in the foliage, which may tip the scales at 30 lb. But they're still green.

Glenda, your comment does remind me that the extreme insect resistance, I believe I have observed in this squash, could after all, be just a coincidence. Only several years of trials will confirm if this is so. Our Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin has generally shown itself to be quite insect resistant, though I have never found any squash resistant to squash bugs, once they get going. Still, at the end of the season, WBPP got wiped out by squash bugs. (Our different squashes were planted in different patches, separated by several hundred feet.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

Every buff-colored pumpkin I've ever grown has been really healthy, very rampant growers, very disease-resistant and great producers. I think Seminole is the only one I've grown that the squash vine borers didn't get eventually--in the years that SVBs are a problems. I have trouble with SVBs only about every other year.

It makes you wonder that most of the American agricultural system insists upon planting orange (and, in more recent years, white) pumpkins for Halloween and selling them in stores, and yet you hardly ever see a buff pumpkin (winter squash) for sale commercially. Sort of reminds me of the way American agriculture "decided" that all tomatoes had to be red, and it has taken a slew of seed savers to reverse that trend...and only among hard-core gardeners who grow their own.

I hope the first frost is still a long ways off so your big green lunkers have a chance to turn buff!

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, those look just great! I'm looking forward to getting seeds for those!

I have, like you, had a few challenges with Warsaw Buff. But it has been a weird summer and maybe not fair for me to judge anything just on its performance this summer. I planted mine on June 4 and, after getting one rather smallish pumpkin, lost that one plant to what I thought was wilt and was more than likely sowbug damage. The remaining plant in that same bed has been putting on fruit prolifically but even with the sowbug population under control, lots of them are turning yellow and rotting starting at the blossom end. The fruits on this particular plant are shaped and colored like zucchini though. I do have some survivors and they have grown to be about 10-12 inches long and maybe 10 inches around. They are dark green, almost black. I have no idea how to tell when these are ready to pick as it doesn't look like they're going to turn color. Then the third Warsaw Buff plant that is in a different bed has about four buff-colored fruits on them, the largest of which is probably 8-10 inches tall and maybe 20 inches around. The one I'm watching in particular still has green streaks running from the stem end and it is quite attractive.

Other than the sow bugs, I've seen squash bugs, but they have been white, or, at least, light gray. I've never seen squash bugs this color before. They tend to sun themselves on the leaves. I've killed whatever I've seen, and looked for their eggs but haven't seen any. I haven't noticed any of them out there for several days now. We had a low of 49 last night. For the next two nights, Mesonet projects that it will be 45.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

In 2006, growing out some seed which had been frozen since 1986, I got a crook necked Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin. It and a couple others, in that batch, were darker green before they too turned buff. So, Ilene, that may be what you have.

I think that many things in our culture are determined by pre-conceived ideas. I remember learning how the Pilgrims lived off of orange Jack O'lantern type pumpkins, which helped to save their lives during that first winter. Then, when other squash were available, I read that it took them years to come around and recognize that others were better.

If I was growing a winter squash, and I really NEEDED it for my food supply (Guess that's true of me now!), I'd definitely go with a c. moschata, like one of these. This is all the more important when one lives where squash vine borers are found.

I weighed some more squash, which were picked over the last two days. So far we have 101 lb of squash from that one patch of Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins. More than half are still in the garden. The smallest so far weighed 11 lb. The largest actually weighed was 20 lb. We'll have to cook on up to try it out. But right now we have Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkins which urgently need to be processed, since they have damage and are spoiling.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Ilene,

How big do they get before they turn yellow and start rotting?

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Dawn
I was wondering that myself,and-what does one do with over a 100 lbs of pumpkin? That's a LOT! And I guess, 'by the book'you can't can it.

Barbara


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Well, we do eat a lot of squash. We have frozen it in 2 cup servings. But this year we are planning to can it. Yes, it can be done, even if the USDA doesn't recommend it. We also give squash to our children and some friends. If we had way too much we'd simply use some for poultry feed, and, of course, the seeds are good to eat.

Squash is for me, like peppers are for Dawn (and me). Some years we get a huge harvest. Then, like last year, our squash harvest was but a fraction of what we're getting this year. So it is good to have some extra on hand!

George

Here is a link that might be useful: Nancy Today: Canning Pumpkin/ Youtube


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I need to find a good squash or pumpkin for making pumpkin pies (or a squash pie that I can pass off as pumpkin). Is this a variety you'd suggest for that?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

I was wondering how your Old Timey was doing this year. I would sure like to try it next year if it proves to be tasty.

My WBPP did great this year as did almost all of my squash. Just a lucky year as most of the time I don't get any Maxima to survive. Maybe 1 in 3 years. I probably have about 12 plants in in 4 hills and will have 60 or so squash. I picked a couple that were 10 pounders.

I also noticed the color variation. Some plants had the light tan color while some had a dark green. I suppose one could select for which one a person wanted. I only had one plant to produce the round shape and was unable to hand pollinate as there were no ready male blossoms so they must have pollinated with the normal shape. I think the seed I got from you was 2007.

I also had several rot at various stages. Just the year I think. Several other varieties did the same thing and I have had more than a few Greek Sweet Red pop loose right where the stem attaches to the squash. I have also had some split. Only WBPP and Canada Crookneck and CC more severe.

Note one darker green

Photobucket

This one appeared to have the neck shrink as it developed.
Photobucket

The only round plant I had.
Photobucket


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Dawn, they start turning yellow at the blossom end sometimes before the blossom falls off. The blossom is big and wet and I have even removed it from a couple of the fruit and then set the fruit on a brick and put a knee-high over it. There's a picture of the young fruit and what happens to them on the Sow Bugs thread that I posted, at this time it's fallen down to the second page of posts. It kind of looks like the yellowing is happening without assistance of the sow bugs and then the sow bugs, if they are present, move in to eat the yellow ends. Since broadcasting Slug Bait the sow bug population is now under control. I had one fruit that rotted inside one of the knee-highs. I pick the fruit that starts to turn yellow on the ends. At one point I cut off the bad parts and sliced the remainder and fried them like I do zucchini. They were kind of cream-colored on the inside and the taste reminded me a little of eggplant. I think, like George says, that the inside will go ahead and turn pumpkin color but I've been watching these dark green ones and the way things are going I'm beginning to wonder if they're going to turn color before we get a frost.

Here's a picture of one of the fruit that long ago escaped the yellowing problem, taken this morning. I have about four of them this size, and they are actually a little darker green than they look like in the picture, but when I said before that they were green, almost black, that was too far over the top, even for me:

Photobucket


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Ilene, if at all possible, I'd let those stay on the plant in hopes they do mature. It's been a hard year, at least here, for this variety.

Gamebird, we'll have to cut one real soon and let you all know how Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins are for eating! By the way, there is essentially no clear distinction between squash and pumpkin. A squash pie is a pumpkin pie, and vice a versa.

Festus, great to see you are getting a harvest of Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkins. When I got my first seed I automatically selected for my preference, which was the "round" form. But after something like 13 years, I realized that was all I had left, and I missed the original mix. Fortunately, I was able to get the original mix back, from a friend who had frozen seed back in 1986. Now I've tred to grow the original and let it cross pollinate naturally, without crossing with any other kind of c. moschata. Well, this year it didn't work. I got very little seed of either my round selection or the original. I need to do better next year.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Barbara,

Every year it seems like canning "by the book" gets harder and harder but I try to go by the rules. Still, you can steam it, puree' it and freeze it in plastic freezer containers, so at least it can be preserved that way. Or, you can make pumpkin pickles, but I'm not a huge fan of them (some people love 'em though). Another way to preserve it, for someone with freezer space, is to make pumpkin bread, pumpkin muffins and pumpkin cookies and freeze them. Dehydration is an option too, and then it can be rehydrated and used in cooking.

George, Lots of people do can pumpkin and I am almost positive that when I was younger, canning it was approved by the USDA. I don't know when they stopped approving canning it, but it seems like the official canning guidelines get more restrictive every year.

Ilene, Sometimes when pumpkins start to mature and then suddenly rot, it is because they have a viral disease. Other times, it is because the plants have been too dry for too long. Sometimes they rot because they are on heavy, slow-draining soil but I think it is more of a systemic issue in that the plant is holding and transmitting too much water...not that the fruit themselves necessarily are sitting directly on wet ground and rotting that way. Those are all my ideas, and George may have others.

If the fruit only seem to grow for just a few days and then turn yellowish-brown and drop off the vine, that's a lack of pollination, but yours are growing more than a few days, aren't they?

You also can see misshapen fruit that fails to grow and often drops from the vine if your plants have a mosaic virus, but you'd see evidence of that in the form of mottled leaves as well. OK, now I really am out of ideas.

Game bird, Almost any winter squash will make a great pumpkin pie that tastes better than the ones made from almost all the traditional large Halloween-type orange pumpkin. I grow the orange ones mainly for decoration and for the kids and I grow other winter squash for eating.

Winter Luxury Pie Pumpkin is a pumpkin that makes an outstanding pie. I also like Seminole in pies and pumpkin bread. Others winter squash that make great pies include Musquee of Provence (a cheese pumpkin type with great flavor), Sucrine du Berry and Red Warty Thing (aka Victor). Some of the Hubbard types make great pies too and so do many of the Buttercup varieties.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Why are some squash or pumpkins called "cheese" type? Is it in reference to the shape, flavor or texture or some other thing?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

gamebird - I think it is shape only.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I think it is shape only too--because they look like a old-fashioned wheel of cheese. Every cheese pumpkin I've ever seen is just an ordinary old Cucurbita moschata, and all of them have the somewhat flattened wheel shape. Many are buff-colored, but others are orange-ish. Moschatas are considered the tropical pumpkins and thrive in hot, humid areas like Central and South America. Not all moschatas have the cheese shape and, in fact, a lot of them don't. A lot of the cheese types do not have much flavor and are better used for decorative purposes, but some cheese pumpkins are very tasty.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

The Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin, Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin and any Butternut or Tahitian Squash are all c. moschatas. I will only rarely attempt to grow a c. maxima (Hubbard, Big Max, Turks Turban, Banana Squash, etc.) as they are so extremely prone to squash vine borer damage. It is a rare c. pepo (most summer squash, most orange Jack O'Lantern and pie pumpkins, Acorn squash (just the name makes me distrust these :o ) that can withstand borers very much. Yet c. pepos generally do better than the c. maximas. The only reason I have tried the c. maximas again, after initial failures is that many of these have the absolute BEST quality: dry, stringless, dark orange, sweet flesh!

Jerreth and I cooked up an Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin last night, just so we could say how they are for eating. They're good! Of course, as with most of the c. moschatas I've tried, picked and cooked up right away, the flesh of this one has a drier texture, which I really like. It will probably become more moist over the next couple of months. I ate two bowls of it!

This squash weighed 15 lb. When it was halved and the seeds removed, each half weighed 6 lb.
squash,winter squash,pumpkin

squash pumpkin,winter squash You can see the steam rising off of this flesh.

It looked grainy, much much more so than would a Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin or any Butternut I know of. Yet, it did not feel grainy in the mouth and the flavor was very good. We've decided that this one is a definite keeper

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, I love that dark orange color. I haven't picked another of my L.I. Cheese ones, but no there is one out there that is a prettier buff than the first one. Here is what the inside of the L.I. looked like. Notice the beginning rot where it cracked on the bottom (why I harvested it a bit early).

target="_blank">L.I. Cheese Squash inside

I may harvest it out of curiosity just to see what the inside on it looks like.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Actually Glenda, I suspect that the two (mine & yours) are about the same tone of orange. There is not enough difference for me to conclude that it couldn't be due to the photography. The Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin is a nice orange on the inside. But generally the Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin is a darker orange yet.

Here's what we did with some of that cooked squash, from last night. We made pancakes.

Photobucket

We took about 1 cup white flour, 1/2 cup of cornmeal (from our own corn) 1 teaspoon of salt and about 2 teaspoons of baking powder and mixed them together real well.

Then we added a glug of olive oil and one egg. We then mixed this all together, adding 1 cup of cooked squash to the mix. The resultant dough was about like hush puppy batter.

Finally we added milk to this until the dough reached pancake batter consistency. The pancakes came out very nice!

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, keep giving me ideas of ways to use the squash! The pancakes look and sound delicious.

Now, tell me about cornmeal from your own corn. How do you do that?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Glenda,

I've been looking for the old thread I started, I believe in the vegetable forum, "Corn for Grits & Meal." But I can't find it. This seems to happen with GW every year. Anyway, I'll get you more info soon. I can't write much this morning.

We grow two kinds of dent corn, mainly for cornmeal. Both are Indian varieties (colorful). We let the corn dry down and then, with a hand grinder, we make or own cornmeal. It's delicious! Anyway, I'll probably start a new thread on that if I can't find the old one.

Growing corn for cornmeal is really not hard. But it does take some space.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Thanks George.

I have 175 acres......surely I can find room!


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

The Garden Web search function sometimes leaves a lot to be desired, so....

I googled using the words Macmex Corn For Grits and Meal GardenWeb Vegetable Forum, and found the following.

Is is the thread you were thinking of?

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: George's Corn For Grits and Meal Thread?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Yes! Thanks! I'm still picking Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins, one a day, more or less; and enjoying it very much. This one was traditionally grown on the edges of corn fields.

Unfortunately, our corn didn't do well this year.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Question: Why are you harvesting instead of waiting closer to frost? Remember, this is a first time for me to raise these squashes and pumpkins. Are the vines dying or what? Or do you just do the time to maturation on the seeds.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

It is a great thread (so very, very informative) and I read every word after I found it. One nice thing was seeing the words of Bill P. (Gonefishin'). I think he passed away just a couple of months after that thread.....so reading his words was like having him back here again.

Our spring corn (sweet corn) provided a good harvest but the raccoons got a lot of it. I planted two types for fall, and the first one is just now silking. The second one hasn't started tasseling or silking yet, but I expect it to start soon. After that, it all just depends on the weather.

Even if the fall crop freezes before it makes, I still have a bit of corn in the freezer, but not as much as normal.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Glenda, I am only harvesting those which pass "the finger nail test," which is to say that their rinds are hard. Also, they turn a darker beige. Anyway, I try to leave most, which are destined for seed, at least one more month, before I open them. Still, we can't wait to start eating them! We had pumpkin pancakes again this morning, since one of our daughters is home for the weekend. Also, if I wait to harvest everything, until frost, I will be really under the gun when it threatens.

Dawn, if you can believe it, I think there is yet one more Corn for meal & grits thread, one which I did after that one, when that one wouldn't come up. I'm not positive, but I think so. That was a great idea to use google.

Yes, I miss Bill P. He was a great fellow.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

You are very high maintenance! LOL I love Google and use it all the time to find threads that have dropped off GW.

If I had know there were two threads, I would have looked harder at the list google pulled up because I'm sure they both came up when I did the original search.

See if this new link is it.

Sincerely, your research librarian, Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: George's Other Corn for Grits and Meal Thread


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Thanks Dawn, uh... that reminds me of another thread I lost...!


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Dawn, I am so glad you are George's research librarian!
These were both such interesting threads. We have some very knowledgeable people on this forum.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

Finding those lost threads was the least I could do. You do so much to educate us, and I don't have to spend nearly as much time outside as you do, because I don't have goats to milk.

Glenda, We do have some very knowledgeable folks on this forum. One of the cool things, too, is that different people have expertise in many different areas. That's terrific. I just love how we all share ideas and information, and not just practical 'how to' info, but also hopes and dreams and wishes as well, and garden triumphs and failures too. Nobody else understands a gardener's "thrill of victory" or "agony of defeat" like another gardener.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Well, I've got a couple of things regarding pumpkins I'd like to share.

I got a nice Warsaw Buff off the vine and processed it, along with one of the long green ones I had to pick because it was splitting. The seed were not developed at all in the green one, even though, ounce for ounce, it was every bit as big as the one that was round. I got some very nice fat seeds from the round one. I thought I'd clean these seed and save them and I let the seed sit covered in some water until today when I noticed a couple were starting to germinate! So guess you can't clean seed of pumpkin/squash like you do tomato seed. I don't know if the others will be good or not. Should I just go ahead and use them for food, or should I continue to try to save them for seed? I have some others coming ripe out in the garden, and barring getting stolen in one way or another, should have some pretty good seed in it. I do want to save some seed, even though I want to plant some of George's cornfield pumpkins instead next year. Since the insides of the green pumpkin was lighter in color than the round one, I pureed the two together and poured the puree into freezer containers. I only got three pints but that's three pints I didn't have before.

I made some really good "Health Muffins" today. What I did was I saved the pumpkin seed that got sliced in half when I cut open the pumpkin, and the center stuff (there wasn't very much) and added enough pumpkin to make one cup. I used this instead of the banana and vegetable oil called for in the recipe. I also didn't have oat bran but I had oat flour, and I substituted half the sugar for some Stevia. I used regular oats instead of quick and didn't notice any problems with it. I like pieces of things in my muffins. I also substituted dried cranberries for the blueberries because that's what I had. Oh, and I added about a teaspoon of Ceylon cinnamon:

3/4 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup whole wheat flour
3/4 cup white sugar
1/4 cup oat bran
1/4 cup quick cooking oats
1/4 cup wheat germ
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup blueberries
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 banana, mashed
1 cup buttermilk
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 egg
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Mix baking soda into buttermilk and then add other wet ingredients. Add dry ingredients and stir to moisten, spoon into greased muffin tins, bake 350 for about 20 minutes.

Just as bakers have been substituting applesauce in cake recipes for the oil, ounce for ounce, so can you do with pureed pumpkin. Today I baked a boxed strawberry cake. The strawberry flavoring in the cake completely hid the pumpkin flavor. What I think would be really good would be pumpkin in a spice cake mix. The two flavors would complement.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Ilene, you have been busy!

Here's how I save squash seed. No, I don't ferment them. If some haven't germinated you have a fair chance of still saving them if you dry them immediately.

Cut the mature fruit in half and scoop out the seeds.

Remove the largest chunks of fiber and flesh, by hand, and then drop the whole mess into a large bowl.

Add some dish detergent and warm water. Then, work the seeds and water with your hands. This will help clean them.

Keep removing whatever isn't seed. Finally, you should be able to finish cleaning the seed by rinsing it in a colander.

When you have nothing but pure seed left, spread it on a newspaper or tray and let it dry until you can easily snap a seed in half. It's ready to be stored at this point. Most squash seed will germinate, if stored at room temperature, for 8 to 10 years.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Oh, I meant to say that the cut seeds and stuff from the pumpkins that I put in the muffins -- I ran them through my food processor till they were smooth. Don't want y'all breaking a tooth or getting choked on part of a pumpkin seed from a muffin! While I did say I like pieces of things in my muffins, I didn't mean to go quite that far.

George, it wasn't hard to get the seed free of the pith, I just kind of pressed them out. But they were orangey around the "seams" of each seed and this was what I was trying to clean off. Your seed always looks so beautifully clean and professional. I'm drying the ones I have now so it's probably too late to get them wet again to wash them with dish detergent. But next batch!


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Ilene, I'm laughing at your substitutions in your recipe. I don't think you made that recipe at all, you just made up a new one. Sounds good.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

For pumpkin seeds a person wants to eat, how do you get the tough hull off the seed meat?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

LOL Carol, I guess you're right. But that's how I cook sometimes. And I guess from the looks of it, there's others that are the same way. I go to Allrecipes.com to look at their daily selections and Recipezaar.com to look at the first few pages of reviews, and most of the reviews are about what somebody did to make it different. I had two muffins for lunch today and they were really good.

Gamebird, when I have enough pumpkin seed to eat, I usually chop or grind them and put them in baked goods. When my kids were little we would spread the pumpkin seed from their jackolantern pumpkins on a cookie sheet, add a little olive oil and bake them till they became lightly browned. Then add salt and eat when cool. We ate them hulls and all. FIBER! I bet George will come on and say what he and Jerreth do. There are those hull-less pumpkins that you can grow, I've heard the rest of the pumpkin is not very good though, and I think it's a hybrid, but not sure.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I saw a recipe on-line for pumpkin seeds and it said to boil them first, THEN toast them in the oven and eat the whole thing. As for me...I don't know.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

If the seeds have hulls we eat them hulls and all, like Ilene said. We once grew a pumpkin with hulless seeds, but it was more trouble than it was worth, due to pest problems. Still, if pumpkin seeds were one's main passion, I'm sure that there are some good ones out there.

Picked a 20 pound Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin last night! The ripe ones are running out now, so I can't pick one a day. A couple of the green ones are starting to turn now. So, hopefully we'll get more.

My porch thermometer reads 44 this morning, and Tahlequah airport reports 39! Yikes! I'm not ready for cold weather!

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Yeah, George, it was 40 this morning here when I got up. Brrrr. Growth of my Moon and Stars has stalled, what with these cool nights, so I imagine I'll be picking those two I was babying along, trying to get them to edible size. What do you do with your pumpkins when frost is imminent? Do you pick beforehand and will they go ahead and finish ripening, or do you cover them, or just put the ones that got frost in the compost? I cringe every year when they have those pumpkin smashing contests. I always think what a waste that is. They'd be so much better donating those pumpkins to a place where they feed people, or at least to some farmer that would feed them to his pigs.

The bushel basket gourds are still bowling ball size. I know that they can get bigger but I don't think these are going to. The vine has been setting on gourds like crazy and I've been breaking them off whenever I can reach them, so that more energy will go into the big ones but I can't tell that has helped. I probably already let the vine make too many, but I didn't see those last two till they were almost as big as the ones that I knew about. With four big gourds on one vine, I reckon that's a lot for one vine, but it's a big sturdy vine, trying to spread everywhere, so maybe not. At least I'm pretty sure we'll have seed.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

It was 44 here at our house earlier, but now it has warmed up to a relatively balmy 46!

I'm not ready for the colder weather. They were forecasting 42 for some places in the northern portions of our local TV station's viewing area, and that made me nervous. Forty-two is pretty close to 38 and we often have frost at 38. So, even though it was 44, it could have been worse and I am relieved---on behalf of our gardens and yours as well--that it only went to 44.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

The remaining pumpkins seem to be turning pretty rapidly. Nevertheless, it is inevitable that there will be green ones on the vines when frost does arrive. I'll pick any which are close to ripe, and hope that they are ripe enough. Really small ones will get picked for summer squash. Others will have to go to the compost pile. The vines had begun setting on more fruit.

Ilene, I sure hope your bushel basket gourds ripen! I purchased a packet of seed this spring and none germinated. So, you are definitely doing better than I am.

Dawn, you are so right. Anything close to forty is getting too cold! I'd sure prefer a warm fall. But it looks like things are going to be on the cooler side.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

I said back in mid-summer that I expected an early fall/first frost because we were overdue for one....but that doesn't mean I wanted one! Apparently, we're going to have one though, if all these recurring cold fronts and cool nights are a sign of what's coming.

I hope to have our actual first freeze in mid-November like it usually is here, but I bet it happens at our house by mid-October. After a night in the low-40s, I'm just hoping we make it to mid-October without a freeze.

My pumpkins are setting more fruit, but you know they aren't going to amount to anything. The gourds are setting more too. Wouldn't it be nice if we had a late first freeze in December? I don't expect it to happen, although it did in about 2003 or 2004.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Have you noticed that the coldest night time temperatures, during a given month, seem to coincide with the full moon? I think we made it this time. But when the full moon (or close to it) arrives next month, I would expect a frost here.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

The weatherman on the Tulsa TV station said we were going to have a warmer than usual fall. So far I haven't seen that.

October 15 is normally the approximate date of our first frost here. If we manage to cover everything, sometimes we can extend it a full month, but most of the time the covers don't help enough. So discouraging to get ONE night of freezing temps and then after everything in the garden is dead, to get a full month of beautiful warm weather.

I hadn't known about the coldest nights being on the full moon but it makes sense. Is that what the "harvest moon" is about? My dad used the Farmer's Almanac and would always go by the phases of the moon for his planting and such. I haven't done much of that, although I did try to plant around the full moon this year because someone said the gravitational pull is greater and it makes the seed germinate faster. I guess I could do with a few lessons on the moon's role in gardening. Anyone know of an informative website?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

I do think we often have especially cold nights on the night of the full moon, especially if the sky is cloudless. We know that the moon affects tides, so I don't know why it wouldn't affect weather patterns as well.

Ilene,

I get mixed results when I cover plants too. One of the key factors seems to be how many hours we're below freezing.

I always try to cover them though, because some years I luck out and the covered plants survive and go on to produce for a few more weeks.

I am just now starting to pick fall green beans, sweet corn and cucumbers, so I hope the first freeze stays away for a while longer. The fall tomatoes are slow too, but I have picked a few ripe ones from them. I need at least another month of non-freezing weather for the fall tomatoes and pumpkins to mature. I'm not real worried about the cool-season crops. I have frost blankets to cover them and they should be fine, but the warm season crops need to hurry up and produce before time runs out!

As nice as the cool, cloudy, misty, rainy, foggy September weather was (and maybe some of y'all had some of that in August too?), it sure did slow down the garden. Once the sun returned, everything kicked back into production.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I have not read anything about colder nights with the full moon. That's just my own observation. We seem to have close calls with frost on the full moon, and it seems that when it finally hits, more often than not, it's on a full moon.

Studying about the effects of the moon, on planting, is one of those things I want to do, but haven't had time!

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Well George, when you start getting into studying the moon, let me know what you're reading and I'll give it a try, too. Might be a good thing to do during the winter months. I just truly believe, and I don't mean to be preachy here (I've been flamed by Atheists before for talking about God on a public forum but I still do it sometimes anyway), but I know it is true that God put everything on this earth and in the solar system for a purpose, to work in synch with everything else. But so many, in these modern times, have not been taught how to work within the framework. We pump chemicals into the air and into the ground and into the water and create so many of our own woes, just out of ignorance. OK, preaching is over.

Dawn, my problem with the first fall freeze is making the decision as to whether to pick everything or not. If I don't pick, and my cover doesn't work, I've lost the opportunity to make relish out of my green tomatoes and other baby veggies. If I do pick, and the cover does work, then the new stuff that sets on doesn't have time to ripen before the next freeze. The more I think about it, I think for me it's not worth covering things, unless the freeze is expected to be very light and very short. I don't have quite the two harvest seasons, here in "almost Kansas", as those of you in the "almost Texas" part of Oklahoma enjoy.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

I haven't read anything about the full moon affecting the severity of early fall freezes or late spring freezes, but my personal observations over the years are the same as yours. This would be a great topic for us to explore when it is quieter here on the forum in the winter months.

Ilene,

If I lived as far north as you, I might not bother covering up stuff either.

I have a hard time making myself do it here. It is so much work, and if the wind is blowing hard, it is really hard. I argue with myself about whether or not it is 'worth it' to cover up stuff. Sometimes I think I should just go with the flow and let the plants freeze whenever the first freeze comes. If I do that, though, then I'll wish I hadn't if the freeze is followed by a month of nice weather!

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Hey folks,

I've been three days, in the time available to me, trying to upload a couple more pictures on Photobucket. Most of the time, I wait and wait... and then, when it says that the upload is complete, ... nothing appears! Anyway, here are a couple more pictures. I couldn't get the third one up.

Here's a picture of the collection of Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins, on our porch. We gave one away and this picture is one day out of date. There are now, actually, ten.
Photobucket

Here is a picture of the interior of a Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin. WBPP (as I often call it in writing) hasn't been nearly as prolific as Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (OTCP). Yet the fruit's flesh is of higher quality. Note the darker orange and smaller seed cavity. If the OTCP had a seed cavity proportionately that small, each squash would weigh roughly twice as much as they actually do!

Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin halves

I have to run!

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Wowee, your WBPP's are growing taller than mine, but I am getting that bright orange flesh. Mine are round and about as big as a small cantaloupe. I do have one out in the garden now that's kind of bell-shaped / teardrop shaped. I had to pick another one of the dark green ones and it is laying on the table on the back porch, showing signs of turning color. I check it every day because it was showing signs of splitting. The one I picked and processed earlier, because it was splitting, had very light flesh and the seed was not developed. Isn't it weird how many shapes and sizes these things grow into!

George, your OTCP's look wonderful.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, I love that dark orange flesh. I may have to try that one sometime. I just counted and I have 10 large LICS left in the garden....I won't be needing pumpkin any time soon. It is sad but I was trying to think of who I could give some to but don't know anyone who would work them up when they can just buy a can at the store. I guess we are the only crazies left!

Glenda


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

I want to try the OTCP next year but I sure had a good harvest of WBPP this year. I just picked this cart full off of two hills of about 7 plants total. Total area was about 20 by 30 feet. I picked about 300 pounds of squash and I still have some more to get but will wait for a frost. The squash in the middle is 13 pounds.

My Mesquakie corn is drying down but the Cherokee Squaw is still green so may be a little light if it gets caught by a frost.

I know what you mean about photobucket. I can only upload 1 pic at a time or an error occurs. I can only get this one size picture. How do you get a larger one like you post? The only options on resizing are tiny and small.

Jack

Photobucket


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Yes, these two squash do come in a many shapes. That's one of the unique things about them. Jack, looks like you got a very unique group there. I've seen WBPP put out fruit of that shape. But I've never seen an entire batch come out like that! On the other hand, this year, in my garden, with the exception of just a couple, all of ours came out more round. I consider it a challenge to keep all that diversity. So, next year, I'll have to grow out seed from at least one other year in order not to narrow things down and lose some shapes.

I wish I could tell you how to change picture size in Photobucket Jack. The only thing I do know is that I do all my sizing with my photo shop program and that does affect how large a picture shows up in Photobucket. They do have limits however, if one uploads too large of a picture it is automatically re-sized down. Our camera is set to take pictures which are about 700 kb in size. But before I upload to photobucket I re-size them to about 165 kb. That's what you're seeing in this thread. The 700 kb size takes up too much of the screen and isn't necessary. Personally I like the size you're using.

Glenda, you're right. How we have rarely found people who appreciate making pumpkin/squash from scratch, though there are some. Here in Oklahoma, I guess it's a cultural thing, but I have met a fair number of people who don't know that one can eat a squash unless it's a summer squash.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Isn't that sad, that people are too lazy or too inexperienced to be able to process a pumpkin/squash? I guess they're just not hungry enough.

Glenda, I bet that if you advertised, you'd get contacted by people who'd want your extra pumpkin. Does your local radio station have a swap time on the air? We have here what is called "Consumer Call" and people can call in and tell the DJ on the air about what they have to sell or give away, or what they're looking for. There's also Craig's list, but we have to use the Tulsa one and so for me that's not very helpful because most of the people who look at it are in Tulsa. Is there a church or an organization that feeds people? One of our local churches is involved in that "Angel Food Network" where people sign up every month and pay a certain amount, and they get food that's supposed to be worth a lot more than they paid. We were in it for a little while but we found that most of the food was stuff we wouldn't have bought, given the choice, and we were hard-pressed to use it up. There were cuts of meat that were really tough and shrunk up a lot when they were cooked, chicken tenders that were mostly breading, meat patties that had some kind of spicy breading on it that was so hot we couldn't eat it, tomato soup that had chili powder in it and so I used it up by making chili with it, and so on. But people in some areas say they get really good stuff. I don't know if it's dependent on regions and maybe we're not in that good a region or what. But anyway, maybe they would take your pumpkins and tuck one in each box. Or if there's a group that makes a daily meal for the poor, I know they'd be happy to have them. But I know what you mean about having an over-abundance. I haven't planted zucchini for two summers now because I had so much of it in the freezer. And we'll be eating okra out of the freezer for at least another year. We're down to about two pints of pumpkin from the last Jack o'lantern pumpkins that I bought for the grandsons, and that's been several years ago.

Jack, there's an edit function in Photobucket, just click on the "edit" link that's just above the picture that you want to change. When you get there, click on "resize". Most of my pictures are 640x480 but if I use a different camera the pictures are larger than that and they make the thread take longer to load. Just be sure that the box that says "keep proportions" is checked, and you can change one of the numbers and the other will change to correspond. Then click the "apply" button that's up there on the top. This will show you a different sized picture. There are three rectangular buttons under the picture. On my photobucket, only part of the buttons show and so what they are labeled doesn't show. When you are done editing, in order to save the changes that you have made, you have to click that button on the lower right. If you have already posted a picture on this forum, the change will take effect on it after you've done this, and refreshed the view of the thread. But personally, I liked the size of your picture, at least for that particular subject. It was a good pic. When you make pictures larger than they were meant to be, you lose resolution. I haven't had any trouble with Photobucket, but I only use it for here. When I want to upload more than one picture, I hold down my CNTL button while selecting them from the box that shows my files (after I've chosen the option to upload pictures from my computer), and that allows me to load as many as I want at one time. Hope this helps.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, So have I, and I've had people tell me it isn't worth their time to cook a winter squash when they can just buy a can of pumkin pie filling, or pumpkin puree, so I guess that even those who are "in the know" and know how to process pumpkins/winter squash stil only think of winter squash as a replacement for pumpkin in pie.

One thing that makes it all worse is that most recipes for pumpkin (pie, bread, cake, soup, etc.) in which some of us here would use winter squash instead of orange grocery-store Halloween-type pumpkins invariably call for one or two cans of pumpkin puree. It would help if food editors would publish recipes that start with a winter squash or pumpkin instead of a can of already-processed pumpkin.

I love seeing all the winter squash and pumpkins in the store this time of year, but I bet more than half of them are purchased by people who will use them for decorative purposes only. That's sad.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I would like to see some recipes for winter squash. Who will share?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)2

A question for the winter squash growers. It is looking like I will have to pick everything from my garden this weekend. It is obvious that the spaghetti squash is not going to be ready because it hasn't even changed color. It needed 3 more weeks to reach maturity. All of the butternut squash, though small, are the right color but the skin has not gotten hard. Will it still be good to eat and just not keep well or will it still be too immature to eat? I think it will be at about 81 days by the time I have to pull them. I got this seed from a trader so I don't know what the DTM is for this variety but most butternut appears to be about 90 days.

I knew I was taking a chance when I planted it, but I was willing to gamble in this case. I was hoping for a November first frost. There's always next year.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Carol,

The recipes I posted on the Above Ground German Sweet Potato thread are for winter squash, and I also put a link on that thread that takes a person back to an older post from midsummer that also had some squash recipes.

Maybe other folks will have more recipes to share.

You can substitute winter squash for pumpkin in any pumpkin recipe you have too, like for pumpkin bread, pumpkin cookies, pumpkin muffins, etc.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Carol, if you have immature squash, you can use them in things like soups and stir-fry. My immature WBPP tastes a little like eggplant, so I'd think you could even make a moussaka.

I grew spaghetti squash one year (seed from one I bought at the grocery store) and the squash bugs killed the plant before I even realized they were there. I picked the immature squashes, cut them in half and microwaved them, and the pulp was already spaghetti-ey. In fact, I think I put spaghetti sauce on some of it and ate it that way. It was good, even if it wasn't mature.

I, too, think I'll be picking everything this weekend, as there's a hard freeze predicted for Monday night here. NOAA predicts a low of 39 on Friday night so I may go out and dig my volunteer sweet potatoes today, as sometimes, even when temps are above freezing, we still get frost in low places. It's been an interesting summer, some things did well and some did not, but I learned a lot.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Carol, try one of those butternut. My guess is that, once they turn buff colored, they will be quite good to eat. Every now and then we harvest a Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin, which is not so very mature, and the taste and texture is really good.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Thanks Dawn, I remember seeing the recipes and I found some others on line.

Thanks George, That is what I wanted to here. They are not as large as butternut usually is, but they changed color a long time ago. I was looking on-line last night and found a butternut that stays small, so that may be what I have. I just thought it was the cooler weather, but maybe not, because they all look the same.

I also saw a picture of a mature spaghetti squash that was light green like mine are, but I think mine are just immature. I was expecting yellow. They were also a traded seed. I have bought seed for next year from Willhite. The green one I saw on-line is called "Vegetable Spaghetti" and is also on the page I'm linking.

I would like to plant one hill of as many kinds of squash as I can because growing them has been fun. Do they readily cross? I (mistakenly) bought a weird one at Baker Creek. I had chosen everything I wanted and still didn't have enough to meet the "package deal" they had as an in-house promotion so I thought I would finish it out by just grabbing a few more. I bought a crazy white squash with fingers all around it. Guess it will be a great fall decoration. HeeHee. You know you have too many seeds when you will just grab anythiing. It wasn't that I couldn't find lots more things I wanted to try, but I was buying from the leftover 2009 seeds that were on sale. LOL I had all the seeds I needed before I made the 2nd trip to take my friend. It was too good a deal to turn down. I bought several pink tomato seed that I have never heard of and a few of my old favorites.

Ilene, I am like you and I would have to try eating them, immature or not, but mature is better. LOL

We had a thunderstorm during the early morning hours with lots of thunder and lightening and heavy rain. Evidently the mesonet station didn't get it because they are only showing .16. The county north of me is showing .56 and I was guessing that we got around half an inch. I haven't ventured outside yet, because it doesn't look inviting although the temp is 62.

The ugly squash is called "Yugoslavian Finger Fruit" and is the last one at the bottom of the page.

Here is a link that might be useful: Ugly squash


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Carol,

All members of the Cucurbitaceae family cross-pollinate from pollen from other varieties within the same species, and crosses are very common since they are insect-pollinated and the insects really move around from plant to plant. Cross-pollinated plants can give you seed that produce all sorts of random stuff....To ensure pure seed for seed-saving, you'll have to hand-pollinate, bag blossoms, isolate plants, etc....the method you use is your choice.

It has been raining here, on and off, since around 3 a.m. and the weather radio went off once while we were sleeping to tell us a Thunderstorm watch had been issued. We've had thunder, lightning and rain, but nothing violent. We don't need more rain though, and it is much warmer today....in the 70s when I went outside early this morning to feed the chickens instead of being in the 50s as it has been lately.

When I grew Yugoslavian Finger Fruit, I let it stay on the vine a long time and then just harvested it and used it as ornamental in my fall pumpkin/squash/gourd decorative display. They say it is quite good as summer squash if harvested young, but it didn't harvest any of it at that stage.

That reminds me.....if it ever stops raining, I need to harvest the dogs' gourds. They've already harvested several themselves (they play with them), but I want to harvest the rest and pile them up with your pumpkins and winter squash as a fall display. I think the dogs ended up with at least 5 different kinds of gourds growing on their fence around the dog yard this year, and they've been having fun harvesting them, chewing them up, and knocking them around the yard....they use the round ones as substitutes for tennis balls to chase. You know it is a good garden year when the dogs get a good harvest from their unirrigated gourd plants. I am starting to wonder if we're headed for a record rainfall year here. I need to search and find out what the record rainfall for Love County actually is. The rainiest years we've had since moving here were in the upper 40s--maybe 44 or 46" of rain--and I think they occurred in 2002, 2004 and 2007. I am sure we'll finish this year with twice the rain we had last year, and the plants have mostly loved it.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Years ago I grew Butterbush, which is a very small bush butternut. The quality of the squash was good. But the fruit were too small for my taste and the plants, being bushes, didn't produce enough for us. We also grew Ponca Butternut, which has a restrained vining habit and somewhat larger fruit. Ponca was very good. I simply stopped growing it because I wanted to maintain Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin (WBPP). WBPP was the ONLY seed which I managed to carry with me into Mexico and keep it alive nearly 14 years to bring back with me. The rest, I had to hunt down from people who had received seed from me.

Here's a link to a guide on hand pollination. It's not hard to do.

George

Here is a link that might be useful: hand pollination of squash


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, I learned how to pollinate squash from that thread when you first wrote it and actually put it into practice on my early squash this year when the pollinators weren't so active. I love your explanation and even taught a grandson how to do it. I am not sure if I will save seed from any next year because I am going to plant several just to try them. I will hold back part of the seed for the next season and then will plant only the ones I like and maybe save seed that year. Big plans, huh?

I have grown all kinds of summer squash but this was my first year to grow winter squash. My DH thinks they are all too sweet for a vegetable, but would probably like them in pie or muffins, etc. Also, they take a lot of space. I have the bug now and I want to grow them all. LOL

Dawn, I should have known that you had grown all the squash, warts and all. LOL

I went out and harvested a butternut and it was actually harder than I thought it would be. The seed cavity filled the entire opening and hadn't pulled away from the squash at all, but the seeds look fairly mature (not saving them). The flesh was not as orange as I was expecting but I am cooking it anyway. Maybe we can eat it. LOL I think there are probably 8-10 out there that are to this stage.

I noticed that the spaghetti squash is beginning to show ridges like the picture of the "Vegetable Spaghetti" on the Baker Creek site. It says 88 DTM on that one. I will probably miss that date by about a week. I will pull them anyway. I will keep a close watch on the forecast and maybe I can leave everything until Sunday or Monday.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Carol,

Is it Saturday night you're expecting freezing temperatures? That's going to be our coldest night of the week here, and maybe of the fall season so far.

I've kept winter squash from freezing before by piling up mulch (leaves, hay, straw) around the fruit (didn't waste them on the leaves) and then throwing a sleeping bag or two (cute carton character prints left over from DS's childhood, so they were oh-so-attractive in the garden) on top of all of it.

I've also had winter squash survive uncovered when other veggies froze, and they are always in the lowest area of my garden, in the worst soil so you'd think they'd freeze first because they sit in a low-lying frost pocket.
If all the need is a week or two to ripen up and reach maturity, it would be worth trying to cover them. Even if the foliage dies, I'm thinking the squash themselves might have enough stored energy to mature.

I did go winter squash and melon crazy for a few years here and it all was the fault of Baker Creek....because I wanted to try so many of their varieties. I've since cut back because they are space hogs. And, speaking of warty squash....Red Warty Thing (aka Victor) and Maria di Chioggia are two of my favorite warted ones. I like Black Futtsu too, although it isn't really warted.....just lumpy and bumpy and wrinkled. I saw Black Futtsu in Central Market in Fort Worth on the day we went there a couple of weeks ago and was shocked to see it in a store. When I started growing it, you could barely find seeds to plant and now you can find the squash themselves in a grocery store. That gives me hope that if there is consumer demand for good heirloom varieties, then someone will grow them and sell them.

I do still have 4 or 5 pumpkin vines producing--they are fall pumpkins I planted for 2-year-old Maddie. They have Jack-B-Little, Baby Boo and Small Sugar Pie pumpkins on them for her. None of them are ripe now, but they are coloring up nicely and she'd enjoy playing with them even if I picked them right now. I'm hoping they'll fully ripen before we pick them, but it just depends on the weather.

Our drizzly misty nonsense has stopped and we have a little sunshine. I hope the plant leaves are soaking it up.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

It was Monday that I was most worried about, but it looks like the forecast has changed a bit now.

Fri 42
Sat 41
Sun 43
Mon 40

I am usually a bit later to get a freeze than others around me, but this year it has been cool for a long time, so I don't know if that will hold.

I tried the squash tonight. It was small so we were able to eat the entire thing. My husband is always one to praise the food but didn't praise the squash. I asked him how he liked it and he said, "It's OK". If I had to give a close interruputation of that answer, I would say it meant, "Let's have this again......in about a year." Guess I will be eating the others for lunch. LOL

I thought it was OK. It tasted almost like a very mild sweet potato. If I could have it the way I would most like to have it, it would have butter, brown sugar and a handfull of pecans. I probably could have that for lunch if I don't eat anything else.

Al loves pumpkin pie, and he likes sweet potatoes also, but he will save them until the end of the meal and have them like desert. He couldn't believe it once when he ate with my mother and she candied the carrots. He just doesn't like sweet veggies. He doesn't like cranberry sauce and sweet vegetables, other than that, he is very easy to feed.

I saw one of those warty pumpkins at the grocery store also. I saw a lot of really weird shapes and colors with the vendors that were set up at Baker Creek. I started to buy one just to get the seeds. Like I need seeds.....

This is what I have for next year, not including the 6 types of summer squash:

Acorn
Golden Acorn
Spaghetti
Jack O' Lantern
Yugoslavian Finger Fruit
Hopi Pale Grey
Turner Family Pumpkin
Long Island Cheese
Upper Ground Sweet Potato
Golden Hubbard
Jumbo Pink Banana
Baby Blue Hubbard

So you see, I can have some weird and warty ones to if I want to.

I don't know yet which ones I will plant, but the rest of you may not have any squash bugs at all because they may all be at my house. LOL


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I'm thinking you could just plant them in holes dug into the yard and they'll shade out all the bermuda grass, giving you a quick way to turn your entire lawn into a new garden space.

Feel free to plant them all, and the rest of us will be relatively squash bug free for the entire summer while your garden will be hosting squash bug and squash vine borer conventions.

Our forecast has improved in a good way, with the overnight lows now forecast to be about 4 to 6 degrees higher! I like that forecast.

Of course, it won't matter if flooding hits Thursday and everything drowns.

For the last couple of months, it seems like the weather is targeting our gardens more than usual.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Be aware that the Long Island Cheese will cover an area 20x20 feet or more but it will be relatively free of borers or squash bugs.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

To me, that makes it a GOOOD squash!


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I love Seminole for the same reasons--it grows like mad and the SVBs have never killed it or even harmed it here in our garden.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Dawn

What do your Seminole look like? I bought seed from several places and just planted them for the first time this year and as you can see I got several different shapes. I wonder if they are all Seminole. The one in the middle has this mottled appearance before changing to the buff color and the other are a dark green. I got seed from Baker Creek, Fedco, and Sand Hill. I think the one in the middle is from Baker but am not sure. I did not keep them separate as I thought they would all be the same.

Amy Goldman said in her book there was variation in shapes. She got her seed from Rev seeds which is now Homestead seeds. That is part of The Great Pumpkin Patch in Arthur, ILL. I was there last week end and they had some Seminole that looked like the picture in her book.

Photobucket


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/tips/fall/pumpkins.html

Info on canning or not canning pumpkin. It seems that cubed is ok, but pureed is not.
Anyway, a very handsome bunch of pumpkins & squash. I made sweet potato pie one year & only 2 of us knew the difference. Pretty sure that commercial canned pumpkin is actually squash, and I think that I was told it was because of the brighter color & that it was easier to process than actual pumpkin.
Are the OTCP resistant to squash borer and are they a good keeper? Borer's wreak havoc with my husband's patty-pan squash, but so far he's not too enthused about growing winter squash, although he does like butternut and acorn squash with sausage stuffing is a favorite around here.
Another question or thought on preserving. Can you after drying the flesh, then grind it or mill it into flour or meal? It seems to me that if it could be sufficiently dried and then ground that it would have a much longer shelf life and could be incorporated into a variety of dishes.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

That's a really great idea/question about drying and making flour! Uh... I don't know! But we may try it. I picked an immature OTCP, yesterday, to try as a summer squash. Will let you all know how it turns out. For me, I generally don't care for c. moschata varieties as summer squash. They have a different texture than regular summer squash.

Okie, I believe that our English terminology is a little confused when we speak of pumpkin and squash. There should only be one word. Pumpkins are squash and it's not clear what makes a pumpkin a pumpkin "instead of" being a squash. But some squash do have deeper, higher quality flesh, and rarely does one find a orange Jack O'lantern type pumpkin with that superior quality. Some c. moschatas (butternut, Long Island Cheese, OTCP, Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin, etc.) have really good quality flesh. But, in my opinion, not all c. moschatas do. There is a much high percentage of superior quality c. maximas. (The only c. maxima I've tried, which wasn't superior, was Big Max). But sworn them off a couple of times since they are EXTREMELY vulnerable to squash vine borers.

I've heard great things about Seminole. If I didn't have the varieties that I do, and if I was looking for a mainstay, I'd probably look at that one.

The Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin is resistant to borers. In my mind, it has all the qualities that make for a mainstay variety. It's prolific, insect resistant, and of good quality. I like the quality of Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin just a hair better. But the difference is negligible. So far, since moving to Oklahoma, I have not had as good success with WBPP. We'll see with time. But I have not seen it thrive like it did up North.

Here's an interesting one. I drove to Muskogee, this week, to visit one of our church's shut ins. In their apartment complex they had fall decorations set up. On some hay bales I found some buff colored squash that looked an awful lot like OTCP! The only difference is that they were a tiny bit more elongated. Anyone have any idea what that one is called?

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Festus,

In the years that I've grown Seminole (I didn't grow it this year due to weather and garden space issues), I have gotten perfect buff-colored mostly bell-shaped (very slightly bell-shaped, not an obvious big bell) pumpkins every time on very rampant vines that resist all pests and diseases. Every now and then one won't have the bell shape, just an oblate shape more like a cheese pumpkin. Mine mostly have looked very similar to the one Amy has at the bottom of the photo on page 92 of her book. I've linked a page from the SESE website, because they're my seed source and mine do look like the ones in their photo on that page.

Okie22, We've discussed here before that cubes are still approved by the NCHFP, but by the time you process it 55 or 90 minute or whatever they say now, it seems to many of us that its quality has been pressure-canned right out of it. I'd just as soon freeze it (and do) as can it, but I have freezer space available and not everyone has that option if their freezer is full. All commercial canned pumpkin is winter squash because all pumpkins are winter squash as George stated. I don't think any of the canned pumpkin you buy, whether as pumpkin puree or pumpkin pie filling, or in pumpkin pies, cakes or muffins, actually comes from the traditional orange Halloween jack-o-lantern type pumpkin. Almost all traditional jack-o-lantern type pumpkins are low eating quality. I grow those only for decoration and grow other winter squash for eating.

To dry pumpkin enough to grind it into a meal or flour, you'd have to dry it for a very long time. I dry hot peppers until they are crisp enough to turn into powder an it takes forever. I cannot imagine trying to get pumpkin that dry.

Years ago, when I read the book "Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden", I learned that the native Americans dried their winter squashes to preserve them for winter. Pioneers also dried their winter squashes by slicing them into round rings, removing the seeds and strings, and hanging the rings to air-dry out of direct sunlight.

I generally don't dry pumpkins because the dehydrator is busy with tomatoes, but I freeze a lot of it and keep others in the tornado shelter long-term and use as needed.

George, I don't know why some are called pumpkins (well, I do understand the traditional use in this country of 'pumpkin' for large, orange jack-o-lantern type winter squash that aren't worth eating) and others are called winter squash because we know they're all squash. I guess we can blame it on the folks who write children's Halloween books about 'orange pumpkins' and on the marketing arm of the commercial food industry. I think we got our orange 'pumpkins' ingrained in the public mind by the same marketing geniuses who convinced Americans decades back that all tomatoes should be red and round, and they were wrong about that too.

I just think of them all as winter squash. But, if I refer to them as 'winter squash' to anyone else in my family, they think I mean only acorn or butternut squash and not those other "big thingies" you see at the store. LOL So, if I am talking to a non-gardener, I might refer to pumpkins as "pumpkins", and refer to winter squash as "winter squash". But, if I am talking to another serious gardener, I can say "winter squash" and they know I mean ALL winter squash, including pumpkins. Is that as clear as mud?

The buff-colored winter squash you saw that was only a bit more elongated than your OTCP could be Shakertown Field Pumpkin or Georgia Candy Roaster (it can be variable in shape though) or something similar to them. I'm sure there's other possiblities too, but those are the ones that immediately came to mind.

Since it feels so much like fall, today I made apple cider-cinnamon jelly. I have a half a jug of cider left, so I think I'm going to get off the computer and make pumpkin chocolate chip cookies for us 'girls' (meaning our dear daughter-in-law and darling granddaugher and me) to eat tonight after dinner with hot spiced cider. The guys are working today/tonight so we'll have a rare girl's night at home with no men.

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Seminole Pumpkin at SESE


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I like the sound of the Seminole Pumpkin squash. The smaller size is good and storing at room temperature would be great too. I may give that one a try next year. The L.I. Cheese make way too much at one time. I see no negatives from the SESE description of it. Is there something about it I should know?

Dawn, last year I made the best apple jelly using some cider and the juice from just the cores and peelings from the applies I sliced and froze. How do you do the apple cider-cinnamon jelly? Is it all cider?

You girls have fun tonight.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Glenda,

It is the simplest recipe in the world....just fresh apple cider, sugar, a cinnamon stick and liquid pectin. The recipe I use is from Ellie Topps' book "Small Batch Preserving". I made two separate batches today, totaling eight half-pints.

We can't grow apples here in southern OK because of the millions of cedar trees and Cedar-Apple Rust Disease, so I only make it in the fall when the fresh apple cider arrives in the stores in late September or early October.

Here's the recipe:

Apple Cider Cinnamon Jelly

2 1/2 cups fresh apple cider
1 cinnamon stick, 4" long, broken into 4 pieces
3 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 pouch liquid fruit pectin

1. Combine cider and cinnamon stick pieces in a large non-reactive saucepan. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat; then reduce heat and boil gently for 5 minutes. Strain the cider through several layers of cheesecloth or a jelly bag, and remove the cinnamon pieces. Set them aside to add to jars later. Rinse saucepan to remove any residue.

2. Measure 2 cups of cider and return it to the saucepan. Add the sugar. Bring to a full boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Stir in liquid pectin, return to a full boil and then boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat.

3. Place one piece of cinnamon stick in each jar and ladle hot jelly into the jars. Process for 10 minutes in a BWB.

Makes 4 half-pints.

When you eat it, it tastes just like a mug of spiced cider. I like it on apple muffins. I also like Linda Lou's Apple Pie Jam from the Harvest Forum on apple muffins.

DDIL is making some baked goodies for her family's big Family Reunion this week, and the house smells heavenly.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Hey folks,

We've had two "light frosts." I use quotation marks around that term, since they have not killed very much. We still have three good sized Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkins still out there. Two look likely to mature!

I was being real careful and weighing each squash in order to accurately record our harvest of this one. However, between Jerreth and myself, we managed to get things mixed up. We stashed about six of them, before they were weighed, with those which had been. We've also used or given away three of them. Anyway, I am POSITIVE that we've passed the 300 lb mark in our harvest. This is fantastic!

Here's a picture of the main part of the harvest. We've harvested 26 fruit. One weighed in at 8 lbs. Another at 9 1/2 lb. None of the rest have weighed in at less than 13 lb. Most are at about 15 lb. But we've also harvested a couple at the 30 lb mark.

George

Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin Harvest

PS. In the picture there are also a couple of Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I have a question for you. What do you do with all those squash?

I think one of mine in storage may be going bad. It has little beads of juice popping up on the skin.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

We eat them, as a side dish (cooked squash), in pies, in and in a drink called atole.

We've been on a diet and discovered that we can eat all the winter squash we want (not doctored, of course). So it does work as a delicious filler when one has the "munchies."

The juice popping up, is it real sticky or is it watery?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George, here you go again, using words I've never heard of. Atole? Getting to know you has been such an education for me. So how do you make it?

Those are great looking pumpkins. With them lined up like that, looks like they're coming over for a party. All they need are some little hats and scarves. LOL

I've had a few pumpkins that had juice popping up around the stem and that progressed to a rotten spot. Generally it was on those that weren't fully mature, so I went ahead and processed them. I still have the ones that were dark green and club-shaped and they have turned almost completely buff now. I probably should go ahead and process those too but there's not much room in the freezer right now. I'm grateful to have these, they will make wonderful pie. Oh and I found this recipe on Recipezaar. It got a lot of rave reviews. I modified it a bit to use pumpkin puree instead of pumpkin pie filling, since that's what I'll be using:

Pumpkin Pie Dip
Reviewers said this is really delicious. Great for Fall parties. One reviewer suggested doubling the cream cheese as a holiday bagel spread. Makes 3 cups (one of the reviewers said she worked at a head start where they were always trying to find ways to get more veggies into the kids. She said they served this with graham crackers and the kids went nuts for it, lots of parents asked for the recipe so the kids must've gone home and told them about it. Now THAT's when you know something was really good!)

1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
2 cups powdered sugar
1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree (wouldn't that be about 2 cups?)
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger

1Beat cream cheese and sugar at medium speed with an electric mixer until smooth.
2Add pumpkin, cinnamon, and ginger, beating well.
3Cover and chill 8 hours.
4Serve with gingersnaps, graham crackers, vanilla wafers or apple slices.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Ilene,

George is always teaching us something new, isn't he? From having neighbors in Fort Worth who originally were from Mexico, I think atole is a grain-based drink that is usually a combination of masa and water and spices. There are different kinds of atole, and one of them has chocolate in it.....which, of course, would be the one I'd make. I've seen some that are pretty thin, and others that are almost as thick as pudding.

Dawn


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

That's correct Dawn. Atole can be made of many different things. The most common is either of corn or corn starch. But squash atole is also made by some. Here's my recipe. We enjoyed it in Mexico. But had to reconstruct the recipe when we got back to the USA. I took the liberty to add pumpkin pie spice and make it taste like pumpkin pie.

Recipe for Atole de Calabaza
-Cut chunks of winter squash into your pot so that they fit. I left the shell on them and scooped the flesh off after cooking.
-Add sufficient water to boil/steam the squash.
-Add molasses and some cinnamon to the water and squash in the pot, so that the solution will be sweet to taste when finished.
-Cover on low flame and cook till tender.
-Remove shell from chunks and return the flesh to the pot.
-Transfer squash and molasses solution to a blender, add a few "glugs" of milk to each blender full and blend to get rid of strings and chunks. How much you blend is up to you. I've had squash atole that had chunks, strings and entire seeds in it, and it was delicious. Our family prefers to blend it to a uniform smoothness. At this time you taste it and add additional sweetener if necessary. The amount I make takes several blender-fulls to finish, as I make about 2 quarts.
-Enjoy! Something that is really good is to dip pieces of French bread or hard roll into the atole as you eat/drink it.
__________________________
Americanized Pumpkin Atole
-To a blender add:
1 egg
a few glugs of molasses
some sugar (brown or white)
2 cups of cooked squash
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
optional -- 2 or 3 tablespoons of peanut butter
-Milk (fill the remaining space in the blender with milk, leaving just a little space at the top.
-Blend this all up and taste to see if it needs more sweetening.
-Pour the mix into a pot and heat until just boiling.
-Serve

If one has sweet potatoes they can be substituted for squash/pumpkin, and the result is wonderful.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

I think I would like that. Sorta like a pumpkin pie pudding. Does the egg in the mixture curdle when you heat it, or does whirring it around in the blender prevent that?


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

It's not hot enough in the blender to curdle the egg. I heat up the whole mix after blending it. Once it's been blended you'd never know that it's in there.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Still processing (and eating these in February). They're good!


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George you're making it hard to wait for planting time :-) I've got a nifty little packet of these (thank you btw) from the seed swap and looking at all these pictures again is making me a mite anxious LOL.

Glad to hear you're still making great use of them. Thanks for the update.


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Well, here it is 2011! I thought I'd mention that this year was the absolute most challenging (worst) garden year I've ever seen. I had to re-plant my squash, probably, four times, due to squash bugs and drought. But thanks to Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin, we have enough winter squash to last the winter. It matured one 20 lb fruit to a nice buff color. But I brought in three or four more, which were still dark green. They have been turning in storage, and, I have to say their flavor has been good. I remember that Roger Winn, the one who sent me this seed, wrote that they picked these green. Now I know why.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

Thought I'd bump this one up, as sometimes these threads drop out of existence. I hope to do a nice planting of Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin in 2013. My squash all flopped this year. One Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin volunteered in a compost pile, in August. But it only had small green fruit when the frost killed it. Warsaw Buff Pie Pumpkin was planted in a nice patch with lots of tender loving care. But the squash bugs actually ate the fruit before I could get mature seed. These last couple of years have been like living under the plague!

I may also start a couple WBPP plants extra early, in order to get a crop, I REALLY need to renew my seed.

George


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RE: Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin (w/ photos)

George,

I'm glad you bumped this one back up. A lot of our newer forum members may not be familiar with Old Timey Cornfield Pumpkin. I actually planted it this year, and then something ate the plants when they only had 2 or 3 leaves. My Seminole pumpkins survived and took over the space allotted to OTCP so we still had pumpkins.

I'm hoping that 2013 will be kinder to us gardeners than 2011 and 2012 were.

Dawn


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