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2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Posted by seedmama 7 OK (My Page) on
Sat, Nov 10, 12 at 10:37

It's time to get the third annual Dixondale Farms group onion order together.
1. The price per bunch this year is $2.80, assuming a minimum group order of 60 bunches. For more information on this year's price read below.
2. You may order any variety of onion Dixondale sells. See the link below.
3. Orders are prepaid, and all money for orders must be received by me no later than Wednesday, January 9, 2013, so plan accordingly.
4. There will be no group leek order this year.
5. I will request delivery the week of Februrary 11th. You will pick them up from me on Thursday, February 14 between 6 and 7 p.m. Note upfront that is Valentine's Day. If you are unable to pick up your onions, it is YOUR responsibility to make arrangements for someone else to pick up them up.
6. Any onions not picked up will be donated to the recipient of my choice. I am not able to make special, individual arrangements for pick up.
7. I will email you privately with the centralized pick up location in Oklahoma City, and ask that you do not post the location publicly.
8. If you don't want to pick up in OKC, I will ship to you at cost for a flat rate box. Choose a medium flat rate box ($12.35) which will hold 9 bunches, or a large flat rate box (16.85) which will hold 20 bunches. With 2013 rate increases, most out of towners will be further ahead by ordering directly from Dixondale.
9. If you do not live in the OKC metro area (Yukon to Choctaw, and Edmond to Norman) and plan to pick up your onions, I require a deposit equal to what it would cost to ship them. If you show up, your separate, uncashed check will be in the sack with your onions. If you don't show, the check will be cashed to cover the cost of shipping.
10. I would greatly appreciate it if you bring a brown paper grocery sack to pick up to replace the one I give you. I rely heavily on these throughout the year, and because of the growth in our group order, I am coming up short.

How do I participate?
1. Post your onion order on this thread. A copy of your post will be emailed to me.
2. Next, email me directly through garden web. It doesn't have to say much but must include your cell phone. The purpose is to ensure I have a current email for you, and can contact you directly in the event of a mix up on delivery day.
3. I will email you my address with a total so you can send payment promptly.
4. Your payment must be received by Wednesday, January 9, or your order will not be placed. A million thanks to those who have always sent timely payment. Fair warning to those who have tested this date historically. This year you will be out of luck.
5. I am not able to accept any late orders. Please accept my apologies in advance for not having time to respond to your request.
6. I encourage you to peruse the Dixondale website. It contains valuable information on how to prepare your garden before the plants arrive. Prompt planting impacts success, so have your space ready to go.
7. Don't hesitate to ask questions. We had lots of good questions last year, and it helped the process go well for everyone involved.

Notes on Pricing
Dixondale has changed their pricing structure, and the price per bunch in this order reflects that change. Historically, once we hit the 30 bunch benchmark, we received the discounted price of $2.55 for all bunches. However, with their new pricing structure the higher rate of $11 for 1 bunch kicks back in each time we go over 30, 60, etc. For example, a 45 bunch order will be priced as a 30 bunch order and a 15 bunch order. This variable created a challenge for me in setting the price. Depending on how many are ordered, the cost to me will fall somewhere between $2.57 and $2.80. I am passing the 2.80 price point on to you, to keep it simple and to ensure I am not out of pocket. This is a service project for me. It is not, and never has been, a money making endeavor. If a potential overage of up to $.23 is of concern, the group order is not for you. :-)
Dixondale onions can usually be found around the metro for much less money. Newbies may wonder why some of us, including uber-frugal Seedmama, are willing to pay this premium price. Group order onions are pulled and shipped on a Monday and are in your hands by Thursday. Not only are they fresh, they are shipped at a time that, on average, is the best time to plant for our area. Furthermore, we have a much larger selection of varieties. There is no way to know how long plants have set in local stores, or what cold/warm/cold/warm conditions they have been stored in. Furthermore, variety selection is limited, and the consumer has no control over when the plants arrive in stores. That doesn't make supporting your local nursery a bad idea. It's just that the group order caters more to those of us who want some degree of control over the factors that impact our success.

Here is a link that might be useful: Shop and Learn Dixondale Onions


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

YEAAAAA!!! Onion time!!!!!!
It's like sending a letter to Santa Clause!!!!
Melony


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Dear Santa Clause,
I want the same onions everyone else is getting, 'cause I don't know nothin' 'bout growing onions....
Melony


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Last years best laid plans just went down the shoot...but THIS YEAR...is GONNA be better...

I think I'm in for at least 8....maybe 10. Worked on the space today so I'll try to make sure this thread stays bumped up and I'll be placing and e-mailing my list soon.

And even though I don't have my order quite ready, I will again offer to be the delivery person for peeps down Norman way so ya'll just let me know if I need to pick up your order. Seedmama - you are indeed a SAINT for taking this on yet again. Thank you so VERY much!

P-mac aka Paula


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

I'll be in again, will get back in with my order when I have more time. Thanks Seedmama!

Keith


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama, Well, now it feels like winter 'cause you're working on the Dixondale order. And here I was still thinking it was fall. : ) Actually, with an overnight low of 26 and heavy frost, it actually felt like winter this morning.

I greatly admire all the work you do to pull together this order, but I'll be ordering separately because I intend to plant my onions extra early again this year--hopefully the first week in January if Dixondale and the weather cooperate with me. Planting early last year worked out really well.

I also intend to try growing a couple of varieties from seed just to try it and see how it works out.

I want everyone else to know that, unless you are incredibly far south like I am and want/need to plant extra-early, this group order is a terrific way to get very high quality onion plants at a very reasonable price. I prefer ordering from Dixondale to picking up whatever the stores have because the onions in stores tend to be older and a little dried out compared to the Dixondale onions which are not pulled and bundled until your order is being processed and shipped. They are much fresher when you receive them.

Melony,

What kind of onions do you like to eat? The ones that are hotter and more pungent with a very strong onion flavor, or the supersweet ones that are mild? Or both? Let us know and we'll recommend our favorite Dixondale varieties.

Dawn


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Dawn,
We eat onions of all kinds. I don't even know where to start! I just want to make sure I don't kill it


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

WOOOOHOOOO! the onion order thread. I never ordered with the group, but was always happy to see the thread because it meant another garden season was on the way!

I need to look and see what I want. But I am in!

I have to see how many is in a bunch (it is early, and I am sure you posted how many, but I am sleepy still) and what I want considering the space I have.

WOOOOHOOOO! :)


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Ezzirah, There's usually a minimum of 60 in a bunch of Dixondale onion plants. One year, Dixondale must have had digging/packaging folks who were just grabbing a handful, pulling them out of the ground and bundling them without counting, and I had hundreds in each bunch, and I had ordered a bunch of bunches too. Normally, though it is 60 or maybe 70 or 80, but they tell you to expect "around 60".

Melony, Look at the linked page below from Dixondale. There are three types of bulbing onions (but other forms of edible alliums like walking onions) and the different types grow and bulb up well in specific regions, with some overlap. Onions bulb up in response to day length, which for onion-growing purposes is the number of hours per day of sunlight. In Oklahoma, we can grow short-day length onions and intermediate day length onion, also known as neutral day length. Some folks in extreme northern OK can grow some of the long day length onions successfully depending on their latitude. In general, short day onions grow best in more southern areas and are of the sweet types and do not store terribly long, except for Red Creole. Long day onions, which do not bulb up for most of us in OK, are more of a northern type, and intermediates are, as their name implies, somewhere between the two. The intermediates generally store better for me that the short day types do.

I like to grow both short-day and intermediate day types. I sort of alternate, planting about 6 bundles one year and then only 3 or maybe 4 the next year, depending on how many chopped, frozen onions are in the freezer still from the preceding 6-bundle year. I use a lot of onions in certain canning recipes like Annie's Salsa and Habanero Gold Jelly, so plant a lot more than we ever could eat fresh. You do not want to plant more onions than you can eat in a reasonable time frame. Some varieties last for quite a while in dry storage, but others do not.

In the Short-Day onions category, my favorite is Texas 1015Y, sometimes known as Texas Supersweet. It gives me huge onions fairly early. If I plant in January they get much bigger than if I plant them in February, so I try to plant as early as I can without seriously risking losing them to severe cold or to temperature-inducing bolting (flowering). Dixondale carries two types of red short day onions---Southern Belle, which is sweet and only stores about 2 months (I've had it last significant longer in dry years when it was very well-cured and well-stored) and Red Creole, which is a pungent onion, so it stores a lot longer--they say 6-7 months but I've had it store some years for at least 9 months.

I do not usually plant the plain White Bermuda, although it is a great one to plant and harvest small when the onions are just beginning to bulb up if you like to make canned onions, often called 'pearl onions'. White Bermuda has a really short storage life. I also don't plant Yellow Granex because it stores even less well than White Bermuda.

I am planning to try Dixondale's two new short day types this year: Texas Early White and Texas Legend.

Intermediate Day Length onions grow very well here and I have found them to be very reliable in our climate. "Candy" is a very well-loved intermediate (aka neutral) variety. Dixondale sells hundreds of millions of Candy onion plants every year, and for good reason. However, Superstar also is a really good intermediate variety. It doesn't store as well, so I normally use the Superstars more for canning merely because I grow more than we can eat in the shorter storage period that they have.

Red Candy Apple is the red intermediate type they carry, and it is the one I am least happy with. Because it had "candy" in its name, I hoped it would be the red version of Candy, but it really is not as good as Candy if you like to grow big sweet onions. Even with very good fertile soil and good rainfall and/or irrigation, it never gets anywhere close to the size that Candy reaches. Its' flavor is good, but so far it produces much less for the space used than Candy does. So, if garden space is limited, it is more productive to grow something that gives you a bigger harvest for the space used. I may plant it this year, but if it underperforms as it has in previous years, it will be the last time I grow it.

If you'll go to the individual page for each type of onion that Dixondale sells, there are brief descriptions for each variety. Please note that you could order a Short Day and/or Intermediate Day Length sampler that includes 3 types of onions in one bundle. You could buy a sampler of each of the two types that grow well here and try 6 varieties without buying 6 separate bundles.

Onions are not hard to grow at all. Plant them at the right time in well-prepared soil, keep them watered and weeded, and watch them grow. It is important to understand that for each green leaf the plant produces before bulbing is induced at the appropriate day length, you'll get one layer of onion on the bulb. To get really huge onions, you need between 13-15 leaves.

The unfortunate thing about growing onions is that they are biennials and if the weather misbehaves it can cause them to bolt, which means they send up a seedstalk which splits the bulb in half and diminishes its quality. That's just a risk you take when growing them. There is little you can do to prevent bolting because you cannot control the weather. Some years a lot of onions bolt, other years pretty much none of them do. Most years fall somewhere in between the two extremes.

Hope this helps,

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Dixondale Day Length Onion Map


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Thanks Ms Dawn. It is just like Christmas and the Sears Christmas catalogue. I never knew I would be so excited over onions.
Melony


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

luvabasil, Santa is very glad to have you on the sleigh. Can't wait to see what you pick. I haven't even looked at the selections this year myself. I posted this early because last year some folks forgot to set aside some of their Christmas money for onions, LOL.

Dawn, it hardly seems like it could be time for onions. The timing of the group order doens't make sense for you. It was great of you to pitch in our first year, to ensure we hit 30, but the economics for out of towners just don't add up. When we first started, do you remember onion pick up was going to be a social event, a sort of pre-Fling. Then reality hit, and we were all busy, and it was cold. With no social element, economics are the key factor. Now I'll contradict myself and say I ordered 20 bunches last year myself, and it would have been easy to add another 10 to get the best price. I really enjoy getting a chance to chat with people as they place their orders, and seeing them, if only briefly in the cold, when they pick up. So it still has a social element for me.

Paula, Lot's of folks will be glad to see you are covering for them. Thanks for pitching in.

Ez, I'm glad you're in this year. Timing is everything!

Keith, glad to see you. Haven't see you post in a while and wondered how you were doing. I'm playing 'spook' gardener these days, although I'm more of a Colonel Flagg type, gone like the wind. For the record, I have no affiliation with the former Director of the CIA, LOL!


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama, Even though the timing of the seed order doesn't really make sense for me due to my far-south location, I'd still pitch in and order some if you couldn't get to the minimum order amount....not that I believe that is going to be an issue.

Today I spent far too much time looking at the seed catalogs that have arrived already...sort of like window shopping, but doing it from the comfort of the sofa with the laptop computer right beside me in case I wanted to check something online. The Dixondale catalog is a wonder to behold, just as it is every year, and I spent oodles of time looking at the catalogs from Twilley, Stokes and HPS too. I should have been processing the peppers, cabbage and broccoli that have taken over every inch of the fridge...but I think I'll just start with that in the morning. Dinner time is the wrong time to start messing up the kitchen. : )

It doesn't seem possible that Thanksgiving is almost here, the seed catalogs are arriving, Christmas is around the corner....and onion plants usually arrive in the stores down here right after Christmas, sometimes in the week between Christmas and New Year's, and sometimes just after New Year's Day. I can't figure out how autumn is flying by so quickly.

My warm season garden uttered its lasp gasp of breath on Sunday and froze very early on Monday, but so far the peppers and tomatoes are growing fine in the unheated greenhouse as it has managed to stay right around or above 30 degrees even on nights the outside air has dipped into the 20s and a little row cover kept them warm enough that they didn't freeze at 30, 28 or even 26. That will change any day now. I have cool-season everything still growing just fine in the big garden, and much of those crops are in various stages of being harvested and either eaten fresh or processed to be eaten later. I am not sure when, where or how I'll squeeze in any soil improvement in between the end of the fall/winter garden, whenever that end comes, and the beginning of cool-season planting. It looks like I am not going to get an off-season this year which is both good and bad. I am lazy enough that I like to have some sort of off-season when there's not much growing, if only so I can add compost to all the beds and let it settle in a little. I don't want to find myself hurrying to add compost one day and plant the next, although the world wouldn't end if it came to that.

Best of all, though, is that I finally can harvest, I think, without having to worry I'm going to reach into a plant and find a snake.

I will follow y'all's onion order with great interest. Knowing me as you do, I am sure you're not surprised to hear me say I want to grow them all. Well, all the short and intermediate day types, and the leeks, and the specialty onions. Other than that, Dixondale has nothing I need or want. Except maybe their onion fertilizer and a couple more onion mesh tubes or bags. After that, nothing, nada, zilch, although if they'd write a book if they had caps and T-shirts, I'd want one of those......

Maybe the former CIA director should take up gardening or something. Seems like he had a little too much free time on his hands, which is not a problem any of us gardeners seem to have.

Dawn


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Following in the footsteps of P-mac, I am in the Choctaw/Harrah/Newalla area if anyone needs delivery there.
And I will bring extra paper sacks....


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Although I enjoy the 'winter contact' with other gardeners, I will not be ordering with the group this year. I usually order enough that it will be best to order direct rather than re-ship from the group order. Seedmama, you are a doll for doing an order again though.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hello gang! I know it's time to start seriously thinking about what my garden will look like next spring when I see Seedmama's onion thread. Whoo-hoo!

First of all, thanks SM for taking on this task again. I agree with the above sentiments... you are a dear to once again organize our annual gardening kick-off. I'll be in for at least 3 bunches and hubby's co-worker would like to join us again with her 3 bundles as well. I just received Dixondale's catalog so I'll make my decisions quickly and post variety choices soon.

Can't wait to see everyone at the V-Day pick-up. Nothin' says love quite like a bag full of onions. :-)


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Daleok is the first to actually place an order. Go Dale! I'm posting it to this thread because I use it as an audit trail.
1 1015Y Texas
1 Red Creole
1 Candy

Carol, You know I have fun doing it, and wish I more time for the social element. With the cost of gas and postage, plus the difference in timing, it makes a lot of sense for you to place a direct order.

Carsonsmimi, it's my pleasure. Looking forward to seeing what you pick. I planned to read the catalog in bed the night it arrived. Unfortunately, in the short time between climbing in and putting on my glasses, I fell asleep. The catalog is still on the nightstand, LOL!


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

First, I truely appreciate your doing this. I already have vacation scheduled for delivery day, and I will be happy to deliver to the Choctaw/Harrah/Newalla/whatever else is close. I have plenty of bags.
So, my Christmas Wish List:
Texas Legend
Texas 1015Y
Red Creole
Texas Early White
Candy

Sounds like a lot, but most will be eaten as green onions...we eat them in and with everything

I am sooo very psyched! or psycho, I don't know which yet...
I'll send u the email address I pay attention to.
Thanks for doing this, I am certain it is not the easiest thing to do

Melony


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Melony,
You've made great selections. It's a pleasure for me to to have the opportunity to put delicious onions in the hands of my Oklahoma gardening friends.

All,
I'm thinking once Christmas hits, January 9th will arrive before we know what happened. So here's a friendly bump and reminder that payment needs to be here by January 9.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Thanks for the reminder, Seedmama! I'm not sure yet if I'm going to go in on the group order or not, but if it's OK can I ask an onion-related question here? *hijack alert*

Last year I ordered two variety bunches: a short and intermediate day bunch. Both did great (for me, in my lengthy two-seasons of experience in onion planting) and we had a great amount of onions. I cured according to instructions, but had a #gardenfail when I kept them in one layer in a cardboard flat in our hot garage over the summer. About 25% of the onions rotted, I am sure due to being too hot and close together... No biggie, we still had plenty. In the fall/early winter, some of the onions basically evaporated in their skins - I presume some kind of dry rot phenomenon. I'd go to pick one up and find just dried skins. The good news is I didn't have to buy any onions from April to Thanksgiving, so I am calling it a success!

Question is, did the "dry rot" onions all come from one or the other varieties? I am thinking I didn't keep track of which were short and which were intermediate, so didn't use up the short day onions quick enough. Thoughts?


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Mia,
I don't have a direct answer to your question, but if you had onions until Thanksgiving, stored in those conditions, I'd say you did very well. You ordered an intermediate day sampler and a short day sampler, which means you actually had six different varieties of onions. That makes forensics really tough. What do Jay and Dawn think?


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

OK, I'm finally back with my selections...
Please put me down for
1. Texas Legend
1. Texas Early White
2. Candy
2. 1015Y Texas Supersweet
Thanks Seedmama and email sent,

Keith


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Skipping the orange in my stocking- the onion order is much better!

2 Red Creole
1 Tx early white
1 Tx Legend
1 Candy

Thanks Seedmama Claus!


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Mia, I think that it likely was all of them that got the dry rot and not a particular variety although we have no way of knowing that for sure. Some years I can store both short day and intermediate types for 8 or 9 months easily, and other years they more typically last 4 to 6 months. I've never studied it closely enough to see which ones store longest, except that I do know Southern Red Belle usually stores longer for me than the other reds, except for Creole, which also stores well. I just haven't grown Creole lately so I cannot remember how long it stores. Otherwise, they all seem to last about the same length of time if they were grown in similar conditions. Onions that were grown in a much wetter spring and summer or in an area that drains very slowly tend to rot more quickly, likely due to their higher water content.

One problem with dry rot (which I prefer to the stinky, mushy wet rot) is that you can't really see it happening until...poof!....they collapse inside their skins and are gone. Sometimes, if you are picking up the onions in storage and handling them, you will notice their weight is steadily decreasing and that's a clue you need to hurry up and use them before you lose them. (I chop and freeze a bunch for future cooking, and only leave enough for a few months of fresh use in storage most years.)

I think yours did well to last as long as they did in what had been such a hot, dry growing season for them.

I can't believe it is almost onion-planting time again.

Dawn


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hi everyone! Long time no see. I got seedmama's email about the onion order, so I thought I'd check in. I'll probably be sitting out this year on ordering onions. I have a 4 week old newborn to take care of now, so unfortunately my garden is not going to get much love this year...especially the cool season crops. Hopefully I'll find some time to get SOMETHING planted though! I just have to get the beds ready and do something about the bermuda that popped up in the pathways last summer when I was too pregnant to do anything in the heat. Hopefully the weather at least tries to cooperate this year.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hey Heather!

Great to hear from you. Congratulations on the new arrival. I blame pregnancy in my mid 40s for all the stray bermuda I have. And you know what? It's worth it! I had a Pack N Play with a sun shield and mosquito netting, so I managed to get in some early morning and late evening gardening with a newborn. The baby has turned out to have quite the love of gardening, so who knows? Enjoy the baby above all else. Maybe we'll see you in the spring!

Seedmama


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

If it were warmer out I'd definitely give the pack n play a try. Come February or March I may have to do that if I hope to get any planting done! That or I can enlist my husband for babysitting duties. :)


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

okay - I've drooled over the catalog and this is my order as it stands, at least for now. I can and will add another 2, 3 or 4 if needed to reach our group total of 60. (yeh, twist my arm!)

1 of Texas Legend (TXL)
3 of 1015Y
2 of White Bermuda
2 Red Candy

The Sampler bunches are great if you're just starting out, but I feel like an Old Timer now so I'm just focusing on the ones that have done best for me. Please let me know if I need (translate "can"!) increase my order!

Paula


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

This is such a good idea. Although I live a long way from OK (about 1,400 miles from the OKC airport), I've learned so much by reading your posts.

I live in the intermediate day length area but I'm close to the line for short day length so I thought about Dawn's suggestion to order samples of both. I'd like more storage onions though, so this may work:

1 Candy (Intermediate)
1 Superstar (Intermediate)
1-2 Short Day Length Samplers (Texas 1015Y, Texas Early White, Red Creole)

At 60 plants per bunch, that's 180-240 onion plants. I think that's enough for the first year of growing onions. I got a beautiful 21 qt Ball Elite canner for Christmas so so I'll be trying Annie's salsa and jelly recipes this year. :-)

I have questions about when to plant. Dixondale recommends 4-6 weeks before last frost. My last frost is usually in mid- to late March, so I could or should plant as early as early February. Jan and Feb are our coldest months. March is (historically) our wettest month.

Does growing onions in raised beds offset wet conditions?

Have you used Dixondale's products, like "Weed & Feed" or Treflan pre-emergent, or their 10-20-10 fertilizer? Do you think it would be okay to use the less expensive and easily available Preen as a pre-emergent for onions? I use it on paths between raised beds to keep weeds down.

I never thought I'd get excited about onions!

Take care,
Pam


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Thank you so much for organizing the onion order again this year! Please let me know if you need any help!

My order is as follows:

1 Short Day Sampler
1 Intermediate Day Sampler
1 Red Marble Cippolini

:)


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

P-mac, I've got you down. As your enabler, I'm obligated to encourage you to plant more!

Pam, I've never used Preen, but I am aware there is a special formulation for vegetable gardens, and it is important to use that one, not the lawn one. This year I will likely use corn gluten as a pre-emergent, although I may skip it and repeat last year's method. Using a tool Chandra calls the Spacemaster, I planted my onions in perfect 4" on center grids. Because they were evenly spaced I could easily weed with my onion hoe, and skip chemicals altogether. I use the Wolf Garten snap on tool series, so I can have the right hoe for the job.

Onions don't like wet feet, so I would support raised beds, especially if you have clay. My soil is extremely sandy, so until water reaches the clay pan 3 feet down and backs up, I don't have drainage problems. I'm not much help there.

You are very welcome to be included in our group order, but let's evaluate if that's the best thing for you. Dixondale Farms has recommended ship dates, based on zip codes. I've included the link below. Growing onions includes several rolls of the dice, but I suggest you stay as close to your recommended ship date as possible to increase your chances of success. Dixondale Farms has been doing this for a long time and I trust their judgement. If your zip code ship date is the same as ours, the group order will afford you a cost savings of $2.25 for three bunches or #3.45 for 4 bunches. The second shipping cost means you don't save much, but I have a penchant for the fun involved in group activities. (Why didn't III think of Groupon? I've been putting people together for years for free!) However, if your zip code ship date is not the same as ours, I don't believe any cost savings big or small is worth reduced performance.

I'm going to hold off including your order on my spreadsheet until I hear back from you.

I'll try to find the thread where Chandra posted a pic of his Spacemaster. I have two, one with 3" centers and one with 4". Casual gardeners laugh at me for spacing so carefully, but I feed my family from my garden, so maximum yield per square foot is important to me. The Spacemaster also empowers my very small children to assert their independence in gardening. I can say, "Put one bean in every third square" then walk away and empower them. Last year, my then three year old planted my entire bean and cucumber crops without supervision. He also worked one side of the onion bed while I worked the other. It's a great exercise in counting and patterns. When I use them, planting goes much faster, and everything fits in the alloted space. Last year I planted 1020 onions, so time spent was important to me. I digress. Let me go see if I can find that thread with a pic.

Here is a link that might be useful: Ship dates by zip code


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Here's a link to Chandra's Spacemaster. All my beds are 4 fee wide, so I built mine to be 4' by 2'. As I mentioned above, I have one each with 3" centers and 4" centers.

Here is a link that might be useful: Chandra's Spacemaster


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

trees4ok,

Great to see you! I've got you order. See you in February!

Seedmama


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Pam, With raised beds, it all depends on how well they drain. Because we have dense red clay here, almost all our raised beds still have a high clay content even though the clay has been heavily amended with organic matter. Some years the onions and potatoes do fine in those raised beds, but some years those raised beds drain too slowly anyway and the onions and potatoes rot. That happened last year. I lost all the potatoes and about half the onions in raised beds in the big garden because it was very wet in the fall and winter through mid-spring.

As a hedge against those raised beds that stay too wet in rainy periods, I've built two raised beds in the Peter Rabbit Garden up by the potting shed on higher ground. Those raised beds have more of a soil-less container blend in them so that they drain very well. They drain so well that they are great for cool-season crops that mature before the typical summer drought sets in. In July and August, though, it is hard to keep anything alive in those raised beds during drought because they drain so quickly. I tend to use them for cool-season crops that I harvest by late June or early July and then leave them fallow in the dead of summer, and replant them in late summer with cool-season crops for fall and winter.

So, I think you'll have to watch your raised beds and see how they do. My raised beds with clay are fine in an average year, but too wet if there is a prolonged rainy period. Last year, they kept getting hit by 2 or 3" of rainfall in one day and stayed wet forever. They'd start to dry up and get hit by another 2-3" rainfall. (sigh) That's why I hedge my bets by planting half the onions and potatoes in the big garden's raised beds and half in the other garden area's more-quickly-draining raised beds.

In the worst rainy years, I move onions and potatoes to containers with a soil-less mix that drains well.

The problem is that sometimes in January and February when you start planting, your weather is so erratic that you cannot yet tell if the growing season's precipitation will be average or wetter or drier than average. A lot of guesswork is involved.

I normally use corn gluten meal as a pre-emergent. It is only effective for 4 to 6 weeks so you have to reapply it, which I usually don't. After the inital 4-6 weeks, I just hand weed and then mulch with grass clippings to help keep the weeds down. It is sort of a constant battle with weeds but with close equidistant spacing like Seedmama mentioned, as the onions grow, their green tops shade the space between the onions pretty well so keeping the weeds down gets easier as the plant tops get larger. With onions, the key is to stay on top of the weeds from the start because otherwise while you're busy with other things, the weeds are taking over the onion beds before you know it.

I've never used Preen so cannot comment on it, but do know there is one specifically formulated for veggie gardens.


Dawn


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama: First things first. I'm sorry I wasn't clear about the group order. It's a great idea for people who live close. I love the detailed instructions (Feb 14 between 6 pm and 7 pm, and please note this is Valentine's Day). I believe you thought about each potential problem and figured out how to deal with each before it happens. I'm in awe! I live halfway around the country - nearly 1,500 miles - and Dixondale gives me a different planting date (early April, which I may ignore). I'll place a separate order.

You planted 1,020 onions last year? Good grief! That got my interest! How did you use over 1,000 onions in one year? How and where do you store them? If each onion weighs one pound, that's half a ton of onions. I think there is an interesting back story here.

We consume a lot of onions but I don't have an estimate. This will be my first year to grow onions and I don't know how successful or unsuccessful I'll be. With luck, I'll be slightly successful this year, will make mistakes and learn from them, and will have a better crop in 2014.

Most of my soil is sandy over blue marl clay. although I have a band of good soil in one area of the garden. My goal is to grow nearly everything in raised beds but it takes time to built them so I do a few more every year.

I have two gardens - the original "Big Garden" is a 60' x 60' fenced area about 300' from the house. We have bee hives in and near that garden so part of it is dedicated to bee food plants, especially early stuff -- like henbit. This is where I plant low maintenance crops that don't need daily monitoring or picking - potatoes, sweet potatoes, garlic, onions. Also fruit trees, blueberries, figs. Because the big garden is a long hike from the house, especially in the heat of summer, I decided to make several raised beds closer to the house - I call this "the kitchen garden." Last year, I built 8 raised beds in this garden, this year I'll probably do at least 4-6 more. I haven't fenced in this garden yet - last year, the deer didn't bother it, rabbits caused more damage. Talk about digressing ...

Thanks for the info about corn gluten meal- I heard about using it years ago, forgot. Read several articles tonight. Will probably give it a try.

And thanks for the link to the thread about Chandra's Spacemaster. It's a nifty tool and I may make a couple. I like the 4" and 3" spacing, and especially how you use it so your children can help you plant.

As I read the thread, it became clear that this gardening world is divided into two groups: the self-described "anal obsessive compulsives" and the free spirits who probably have excellent eyes for detail and know instinctively how to space plants. Digressing again ...

Dawn: I know you get hit with incredible weather - 12 inches of rain in a day, followed by no rain for months. 9 degree temps in November, weeks or months before we have a light frost. (Still waiting .... we may have 29 degrees on Sunday night, I doubt it). I believe your 9 degree day was followed by a few 80 degree days. It's hard to imagine ...

I think I'll plant about 75% of the onions in the Big Garden - it's further from the Bay and on higher ground, so less risk of flooding. The soil is better and I have a LOT of compost to dig into that garden this winter. I'll plant the rest in the raised beds closer to the house. I'm dividing crops often now. If a disaster hits one garden, this may reduce the odds of getting completely wiped out. Hopefully.

In addition to the onions listed above, I think I'll try to grow one of two bunches of the little specialty ones - probably Borettana Cippolini. Although they are "long day," I read a review by a person from VA who was delighted with them, canned half, consumed half. She lives in the mountains so her growing conditions are different but she's "intermediate" too.

Take care,
Pam


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hey Pam - don't forget that onions can be chopped and frozen for use in cooking. That's most probably how Seedmama and others used their plentiful harvest. I know growning season 2010 was that for me. I just this end of the summer used the last of mine. And I've got to say I love the convenience of having them all prepped to just pull out of the freezer! Give it a try - you'll be convinced!

paula


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Paula - Good point. I froze *many* bags of peppers this year. It's been great to have them prepped and ready to use.

Pam


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Pam,

I'm glad you are going to order directly, although you are certainly welcome. There are so many factors impacting success, and since timing is one of them, I want you to have the best. I once had family in your neck of the woods, so I took a look at the Dixondale zip code indicators and decided it might not be the most reliable source after all. The Bay can really impact the weather.

I have a really great basement which allows me to store many food items for much longer than would normally be expected. The basement's design was driven by the desire to be leak proof and structurally sound. Serendipitously, it has given us a great environment for both temperature and humidity. I share my harvest with those in need so it all works out in the end.

I, too, have a "Big" garden with beehives nearby, and a kitchen garden. I really like being able to step out just before dinner time to snip herbs or put a salad together. I office at home, so the big garden is a great place for me to go mid-day so I feel I've had a break.

I grew both types of Dixondale cippolinis last year, and was pleased with both. As the catalog suggested, they did not reach their full size potential of 2" at my latitude. However, they did grow to about 1.25" which made them perfect for kabobs and also snack size for my 4 year old.

I do chop and measure peppers and onions and put them in the freezer. Last night I took advantage of our outdoor temps, emptying the chest freezer into laundry baskets and setting them outside on the balcony. I did a quick defrost, and had the chest reloaded before the dinner dishes were finished. I set enough frozen tomatoes, peaches, peppers and onions in the fridge to make six batches of salsa today, assuming my coffee ever kicks in. I'm hoping to take advantage of this week's cold weather to defrost all my freezers.

Take care!


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

**bump back to the top**

I count 36 bunches total for now. Don't we need to get at least 60? And looking at the calendar, we only have 12 more days until the deadline of January 9 to get the monies to Seedmama.

Paula


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Payment received, thank you

luvabasil and jcheckers, your payment has arrived. Thanks!


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Add to my order, please:

1 Yellow Granex
1 more Texas Legend (TXL)
2 Whire Bermuda
1 Short day sampler

That makes my total of 13 bunches. Several work friends wanted in on our deal. Thanks!!!

Paula


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Thanks Paula, I've got you down. Thanks too for including the new total of 13 so I can easily double check my input.

I've reduced my own order. We now sit at 50 bunches. Mmm, mmm, good. oops wrong vegetable.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama, Thanks for the info about cippolini onions - I'm inclined to try both varieties.

"I'm hoping to take advantage of this week's cold weather to defrost all my freezers."

Hmmm, I'm curious about the "all my freezers" comment. Two? More than two? ;-) I need to buy another freezer soon. Since our freezers have to be elevated, I'm undecided about a chest v. an upright.

I'm also curious about your basement but doubt I could replicate your conditions. We live on a floodplain so our house is on pilings 10' above ground. The pilings were driven 28', through two 6' oyster beds. When the house was going up, we decided to enclose the area under the house to make a garage and work rooms. This is great 99.5% of the time but the garage leaks a little when the land floods so everything is off the ground - hanging from hooks, on shelving, etc. The freezer sits on wooden pallets about 2.5' above the floor. We have a whole house generator - thankfully, the freezer is on the generator circuit.

The main problem in the garage is high humidity, especially in summer. Plumbing lines run along the ceiling in the garage. In warm months, water drips from the ceiling onto the floor. Humidity is not a big problem in winter (no dripping water) so I've stored sweet potatoes, winter squash, onions, and garlic down there. This year, I am storing the sweets in a bedroom with heat vents closed. I wish I'd divided the sweet potatoes, put half in the garage, half in the cool bedroom, see which works better. Sounds like another project for next year. ;- )

Burning questions: storage tips? How many freezers? Chest or upright?

Take care!
Pam


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama: I placed the order with Dixondale, asked them to ship the plants a month earlier than the usual date for my zipcode.

Candy
Red Candy (we'll see if I have any luck with this one)
Super Star
Texas Legend
Borettana Cippolini
Red Marble Cippolini

I didn't realize how much the price dropped with each additional bunch until I went through checkout. Free shipping too! We may drown in onions, but no complaints about the price.

Take care,
Pam


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama,
Please put me down for 1 ea. of the following:
Texas 1015
Texas Legend
Southern Belle Red
Thanks!
mo
(thought I posted this earlier, but must have hit preview rather than submit)


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Pam,

I have four freezers, two upright and two chests. The uprights are easier to find things in, but the chests keep things at a better quality for much longer. I use Sterlite tubs and plastic CD crates from Dollar General to keep things organized. The CD crates are perfect for holding things that were frozen flat in quart ziplocs. I store a lot of things in the quart ziplocs: freezer jam, broth, soups, corn off the cob, berries, okra, 1# portions of ground beef, pork chops, fresh fish, tomato sauce, peaches, jelly juice, shredded cheese, chopped peppers and onions. I could go on, but the key is to freeze them uniformly flat so they will store neatly and I don't have to battle falling bundles when I dig. Once frozen, they fit neatly into the CD crates. For similar items frozen in gallon bags, and for oddly shaped loose items, I use the Sterlite tubs.

I also have a dedicated collection of gallon ziplocs labeled 'Ice'. As I use items from the freezer, I fill the space with gallons of ice cubes. When I need ice for putting up food in the summer, I'm good to go, and keeping a freezer full helps it to run more efficiently. The empty bags go back into the freezer to be filled again the following winter. All my freezers were gimmees, hand me downs, etc. so I haven't had to think about which I'd prefer. However, I do think losing the chest would hurt more than losing the upright, so that's probably my answer. It's a trade off between quality and convenience, and with the crates and tubs stacked neatly in the chest it really isn't that hard to dig around. My mental organization system probably helps too. I know that I always store cheese on the far left, meats next to that, fruits next and vegetables on the far right. That way, it's mostly just about unstacking vertical columns. My mom, who wrangles a 10 foot chest freezer has a mental organization system too, although none of us can tell you what it is. When she sends me to the freezer to get something, even with a detailed location description, I've been known to say, "I was just about to take out the trash/change the baby's diaper/wash the car."

In my basement I store my canned goods on some metal shelving I acquired at a going out of business sale in Texas in the mid 90's. Each 4 foot wide shelf unit came with about 30 solid flat metal shelves and a huge number of clip on dividers. As I fill the shelves with pints and quarts, the dividers help to keep things tidy and easy to find. I wish I could find more of this shelving, at a price similar to what I paid for it. In the meantime, if I must use wood, I've been searching for plans to build something similar to IKEA's IVAR storage systems. I prefer shelves that are 30" deep, but for the sake of out of the box convenience, I may someday break down and get the IVAR.

We can with the Mormons twice a year. As my collection of #10 cans increases, I will probably build one of the can rotation shelves found with a Goole search. Conceptually, they are like the soda can dispensers that fit in a fridge, but reach floor to ceiling on a wall and hold the large cans.

I do everything, including storage, as affordably as possible, but it must be functional and built to last. If not, it's not a value in the long run. One exception would be a couple hundred milk crates I got from Target's back-to-college collection a few years ago. They are cheaply made, and won't last forever like true milk crates, but I got them for $.75 each so I'm happy going into my sixth year with them. I use those to store potatoes and sweet potatoes, nestled in some sort of "filler" I have no idea what it is. It seems to be something between long strings of wood shavings and coir. I love telling the story about how I acquired the filler. One day, when I stopped at a new to me Starbuck's to pick up coffee grounds, I noticed a couple of crates near the dumpter. I asked the manager if I could have the filler that was sticking out of the crates. He agreed, but on the condition that I take the crates and their contents as well. I knew the crates would be good compost bins, so I agreed. Once I looked inside, I had to go back in to confirm he knew what he was giving away. The store had been shipped 6 of those ginormous clay pots often seen in Starbuck's and the manager didn't like them, so he had ordered them sent back. Corporate wouldn't pay to ship them back and they were too heavy for the trash company to haul off. They had been sitting by the dumpster for over six months. It was no easy task loading that all by myself, but now I have 6 gorgeous pots.

Back to storage. I've traditionlly stored onions and winter squash on commercial wire shelving acquired at the scrapyard by the pound. Last year, my Fairy Dawnmother gave me some of the net onion socks from Dixondale and I liked them. I will likely get more of those this year to free up my wire shelving.

The basement really has been a blessing, but I don't think IIII could replicate its storage conditions if I tried. It's just been luck. There is an area at the foot of the stairs that stays around 50 degrees all year round, so we keep wine there. The wall next to the mechanical room gives me the temperatures I need to start seedlings. Although we did build with systems to keep the basement dry, I couldn't have engineered a better humidity arrangement. Unfortunately, that means I have no tips there.

I'm embarrassed to say that after I cured the garlic on the back balcony, I never got around to storing it. When I've needed some, I've been running out to grab. With last week's forecast of 9 degrees, Seedpapa loaded it all up and took it to the basement, although I haven't been down to put it in a permananent home.

Our freezers are on the generator circuits too, although they almost weren't. Between the time our house was wired and the time the finish out was done, the lead electrician on our home had to go to prison. Some little something about it being illegal in Oklahoma to kill man outside a bar. The replacement lead did the best he could, but lots of details were in the original guy's head, including which circuits went to the generator. Fortunately, Seedpapa and I knew our job well enough that we caught it before they left the job.

I'm not sure what else I can tell you about my food storage, and that's probably far more than you were asking. Is the pipe dripping in the summer from condensation? If so, I wonder if insulating your plumbing pipes would control it? Best wishes in choosing your new freezer.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

O-n-i-o-n-s !!

Katie and I are going together to get 5 of the Intermediate Day Samplers and 2 of the Red Torpedo Torpea onion bunches...check heading your way tomorrow...thank you, Dana!

Sharon


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Ok I also had some coworkers decide they would like some. Please add

2 short day samplers
2 intermediate day samplers
1 Texas legend
1 white Bermuda
1 red creole

To my existing order of
1 short day sampler
1 intermediate sampler
1 red marble cippolini

Thank you! Sending additional funds today!


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hi Seedmama!

I'd like to order:

1 - Red Candy Apple
1 - Texas Legend
1 - 1015Y Texas Super Sweet

Hubby's coworker would like:

1 - Red Candy Apple
1 - Candy
1 - SuperStar

I'll put a check in the mail to you tomorrow. Let me know if you need a courier for the Edmond area.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

I see this thread is getting really busy as the deadline approaches.

Wow, Seedmama, your description of your basement and food storage systems makes me sound like a slacker. Before I read it I thought I did a lot of food storage, but my storage cannot hold a candle to yours. And I have only three freezers, but also a smaller family than yours so I expect I'll be able to continue getting by with just three freezers. : )

OkieTim is going to be mad at you because now I'm seriously craving a basement....and not likely to get one either, but that won't stop me from occasionally asking him "wouldn't it be nice to have a big root cellar...".

Finally, I never even knew you had a Fairy Dawnmother and I am shocked I didn't know she existed.

Signed,

Your Fairy Dawnmother....who did order more mesh onion tubes when she ordered her onions because you can never have too many of those.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama, thanks for doing this. I'd like 3 bunches of the Short Day Sampler. Sending check today.
Donna


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Onion order

Seedmama, thanks for doing this. I'd like 3 bunches of the Short Day Sampler. I have looked through your message and I do not see an address to which to send my check, nor do I see whose name should go on the check. It is surely there somewhere but I do not see it. I'll get check yo you as soon as I have this info. Thanks!
Donna


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Dear Fairy Dawnmother,

Yes, I have monikers for most everyone. Some I share, some I don't, tee hee. No one can ever accuse you of being a slacker. You run garden circles around me. Please tell OkieTim I am very, very sorry, because you just aren't inclined to take on huge new projects for him without your friends instigating it. LOL

All,

Here's a quick status post. PLEASE check my work.

p-mac, 13 bunches, payment received
mrsfrodo, 5 bunches
carsons_mimi, 6 bunches, payment received
jcheckers, 6 bunches, payment received
trees4ok, 10 bunches, 2 payments received
justsaymo, 3 bunches, payment received
daleok, 3 bunches
draej, 3 bunches,
shankins, 7 bunches payment received
luvabasil, 5 bunches, payment received
seedmama, 15 bunches, outta my mind, but down from last year


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

I have received all payments sent. We are good to go! Thanks everyone!


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Where the heck is the "like" button on this page? LOL!

KUDDO'S TIMES 100 to you, Seedmama! Another "WELL DONE" planning for our upcoming gardening year. Woop-woop! YEA!

I've scheduled a week off of work so I can plant, just so I make sure to have a great harvest.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Thank you, Seedmama! When I mailed that check I felt like my gardening year had officially kicked off, and I have you tho thank for it!

Donna


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Sounds like I just missed the boat. Last year I just bought from the local feed store. What would be the runner-up compared to ordering from Dixondale?

Charles


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hi Charles,
That's a tough question, considering the reasons we order from Dixondale. I've been giving this some thought and unfortunately I haven't come up with a suggestion I can feel good about offering. That doesn't mean there aren't other ways to get great onions, and a feed store might have a great solution for you. Ordering is the best way I know to sway the odds in my favor. I'm sorry I didn't have a better suggestion, but I didn't want to leave your question unanswered.
Seedmama


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Thanks Seedmama.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Charles,

Are you located near OKC? While looking on Sunrise Acres' 2013 availability I saw they had Candy Hybrid and Desert Sunrise onions listed. Good luck! :)


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Thanks trees4ok. No, I'm near the Red River. Actually, I'll be growing things in two places, 1) near Durant, OK, 2) about 20 miles south of Texoma, south of Whitesboro, TX.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hey, Charles - is there any way you can call local suppliers to ask if they carry Dixondale onions and when they may be receiving them? I would think that maybe both sides would want to accomodate. I'm just speaking from local experience when I first joined this group and realized the value of Dixondale onions along with their timing. Worth a try - I would think.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

p-mac, that's a good idea. I'll call around. I went to the Dixondale site to see if they published a list of their sellers, but didn't find anything.

Charles


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

If you have an Atwoods near you, they carry Dixondale onions every year.

Leslie


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Leslie,

Nearest one is in Madill. Not quite on a route I sometimes take up into OK, but close enough to swing that way. Thx for the tip!

Charles


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Charles - Leslie gave you a good tip. I'm rural NE Norman and our Atwoods usually has them by the end of February. You could call and ask them when they expect their delivery (I would think - I actually did this about 4 years ago). My atwoods usually still has some varieties available thru mid-to-late march, but they're often pretty picked over so best to get there as soon as they get the shipment.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Hi Seedmama: Thanks for sharing your creative food storage solutions - so many good ideas! You describe these explicitly so they are easy to see in the mind's eye. I'm sure I'm not the only person who learned new tricks.

CD CRATES & STERLITE TUBS: I love the idea of using CD crates for food that can be stored flat and frozen in quart ziploc bags. I love these creative ways of using objects differently. We use Sterlite containers for so many purposes, don't know what we did before we found them. Trash bags I think.

ICE: You can't have too much ice! In addition to ziplocs, we fill large strong plastic jugs (like those that hold 3-5 lbs of honey) with water and keep them in the freezer. We have a rainwater catchment system that provides all the water in our house. Drinking rainwater at home makes drinking chemically treated water when we are on the road impossible. When we are preparing for a trip, we toss several bottles of frozen rainwater in the car and we're good to go. No more heavily chlorine treated water in hotels. Ever.

Your thoughts about pros and cons of chest v. upright are helpful.

And I do like your freezer filing system - life is easier when you know where a particular type of food is stored (cheese on the far left, vegetables on far right, fruit and meat in between). When I was growing up, we had a chest freezer. Over the years, I got tired of crawling over the top, hanging suspended on the edge and digging through the containers on the bottom, trying - unsuccessfully - to find a container of [fill in the blank] and getting very frustrated. I didn't want to repeat that experience, but having an efficient freezer filing system is probably the answer to a prayer. (Maybe our moms are related. ;- )
I checked out IKEA's IVAR system - I see why you like it. When I googled images of "IKEA IVAR system," I found other IKEA-related sites - IKEA Hackers, IKEA fans, etc too. Who knew? (Not I).

You cured but failed to store your garlic properly? For shame! The few remaining cloves from last year's garlic are stored in a small bowl on the kitchen counter. Last year, I planted hardneck garlic varieties (Rocambole and Purple Stripe). I didn't know that the proper and preferred varieties for warm climates like SE VA are softnecks (artichokes and silverskins). This year, I planted different varieties so should have a better harvest (and longer storage) next year.

I can identify with your electrician story too. The guys who built our house were on work release from the regional jail (repeat offenders). They were good carpenters, careful and precise. They also had serious alcohol and/or dug problems Your story is more entertaining. Ours is just sadly familiar.

RE: dripping water. Our humidity is wicked high. DH created a system so the water drips into a large container (old cooler), then is transported via a hose to a kiddie pool that sits outside the garage on a concrete pad. Our dogs use the pool to cool off in the summer - the infusions of cold water make this a better experience for them. This system works for now.

You have devised so many creative solutions to common but vexing problems. Thanks for sharing. We've had company since last Thursday so I haven't had much time to spend online. Our company leaves tomorrow so I'll head over to the Dollar store tomorrow afternoon. I want to check out the CD crates.

Thanks again!
Pam


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Bump and Question, Has there been any discussion about where we might meet this coming thursday? Last year's meet at Lowes worked out well for me. Thanks

Keith


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Seedmama - This has nothing to do with onions, but when I saw you comment about #10 cans, I wondered if you had seen these.

My son has the free standing ones for his basement, and I use the Pantry Plus in my pantry. Not for home canned goods in jars, but great for cans.

I have an upright freezer, a chest type, a side-by-side refrigerator/freezer, and a refrigerator with a top freezer, and a dorm room size refrigerator. You make me feel better.

Here is a link that might be useful: Shelf Reliance


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Possible change in pick up date

All,

I have sent a detailed message to all participants regarding our scheduled pick up, as well as the back up plan if needed due to weather delays. If you have not received this message, please email me directly.

Seedmama


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Soonergrandmom,

Thanks for the link. There was a time when building shelving myself out of wood was hands down a cost saver. With the current cost of wood, that's no longer an automatic default. Thanks for the link! We are scheduled for our semi-annual canning next month.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

All,
Onions just arrived, so we are go for tonight. See you at the bat place at the bat time. :-)


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

I bought 300 Dixondale onions yesterday. Where I live is off the beaten path for Dixiondale, but I now have 300 Bonnie and 300 Dixondale, plus the onions I started from seed. Maybe a few will survive.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Larry, I have over 10 bundles of the Dixondale's. If your's don't make it, I'll probably have enough for both our families!!!

Thanks again, Seedmama, for all your hard work organizing this!!!! You are very appreciated!

Paula


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Ellison's in Norman has a fair amount of Dixondale onions as os today.


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Dixondale's at Ellison's in Norman

Ellison's in Norman has a fair amount of Dixondale onions as of today.


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Yesterday was a wonderful day!
I got onions, met a real person, and found out what Spring Fling was.
Awesome.
Thank you so very much, Seedmama!
Luvabasil

This post was edited by luvabasil on Fri, Feb 15, 13 at 9:29


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RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Larry, I bet they all grow and you'll be trying to figure out what to do with 600 onions.

Paula, Ten bunches? Trying to set a record, huh? : )

I am only planting 7 bunches. My onions arrived either Monday or Tuesday but since the ground is so wet from this week's rain, I haven't planted them yet. Sunday is supposed to be a pretty nice day, so I hope to plant them on Sunday afternoon if not before. With clay soil, it pays to wait a few days for it to dry out some. It was drizzling when I woke up. I don't know why it always has to rain the week that the onions are due to be planted, but it does.

Dawn


 o
RE: 2012/2013 Official Dixondale Onion Thread

Dawn - remember my "newbie" days when I only hoped to grow 60 or so onions? HA! I added to my order this year hoping we'd have enough for a group order....and now I have way too many onions. That's okay...it gives me bait to drawn in others (insert wicked laugh!) I expect to actually end up planting about the same number as you...or close.

draej - please check your personal e-mail!

Paula


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