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The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Posted by okiedawn Z7 OK (My Page) on
Fri, Nov 23, 12 at 14:12

The latest gardening catalog to arrive is Pinetree Garden Seeds.

If you are not familiar with Pinetree, they carry a wide selection of seeds at very affordable prices. They also carry lots of gardening supplies, books and soapmaking supplies. Many of their seed packets only cost $1.25-$1.50 and some are more expensive but others are less expensive. I've bought packets with a nice seed count from them for as little as 85 or 95 cents in the past.

I haven't had a chance to flip through the catalog yet, but its always full of good stuff.

Another supply catalog that arrived today was Farmtek. It is a good source for some gardening supplies and equipment, poultry supplies and season-extension type equipment like floating row covers and shade cloth.

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Pinetree Garden Seeds


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I got Pinetree today also. I was a little surprised to get it since I didn't order from them last year. Their prices are usually the best and the descriptions seem to be more honest than most. Great for the small gardener, or the large gardener who likes to grow a lot of different things. I need very little this year, but Pinetree just may get my business. I have always been pleased with their stuff.

I don't have Farmtek yet, but I'll try not to drool on the pages when it comes. If I had lots of space, I could spend thousands in their catalog. I still have plastic and row cover from last year so maybe I can resist.


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RE: The Latest Catalogs Are....

I love Pinetree too. You can buy so many kinds of seeds for next to nothing.

My biggest seed order of the season so far is from Sample Seed Shop....I dare not even go look at Remy's website or I'll want to order more (and, believe me, I ordered plenty already a couple of weeks ago).

The latest catalogs received are Baker Creek, Totally Tomatoes, Gardener's Supply (seems like I get a catalog from them every couple of weeks at this time of year), and Vermont Bean Seed Company.

Farmtek comes every few weeks in fall and winter too. I haven't even looked at the latest one because it just will make me want to spend money.

Since Sample Seed Shop doesn't have a print catalog, I'm going to link its website below.

I intended to start seeds of tomatoes in late November for February transplants into pots, but have been too busy. Maybe this week I'll get those seeds sown.

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Sample Seed Shop


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Love Pinetree too! Last year, I ordered lots of new varieties without worrying that we may not like them so I wasted $$. Nice selection too.

I also plan to order seeds from an Ebay store - dragonfly. http://stores.ebay.com/dragonfly183

Most items are $0.99 and a single charge for shipping. Her inventory changes and seems to be increasing. Today she has over 220 tomatoes and 150 peppers listed - and a ton of other stuff.

Pam

Here is a link that might be useful: Dragonfly seeds


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I got Totally Tomatos today in the mail, but doubt I will order anything from them. I am trying sooooooo hard to restrain myself and keep me in check when it comes to ordering seeds this year........it is a difficult task.

Pam, I was looking thru that eBay store last week, I didn't get all the way thru it because it's like 57 pages of listings. I am going to order a few Asclepias incarnata seeds for my Monarch butterflies. I have a Monarch Waystation in my yard. I've already got seeds of A. physocarpa that I collected from my plants this year, plus A. speciosa, A. purpurescens, and Cynanchum leave (blue sand vine). I'm gonna grow some incarnata, Calotripis gigantea, and Tropical milkweed in addition to those. I'm hoping for a lot more Monarchs next year than I saw this last year.

Looka like a really good source.

Dawn, if you get a chance to look at the link, on the first page of listings, she has Chocolate Cherry listed, but they don't look like the Chocolate Cherry I grew at all.

Susan


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Got my Pinetree last week also...but today...(drum-roll please?)....got the Totally Tomatoes AND BAKERS CREEK!!!!!

Anyone else get the Lee Valley Holiday book? (((drool)))

Paula


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Susan, I have seen a lot of variability in the color of Choc Cherry, but mine didn't look like hers either. This year, mine definitely had a certain color in May and June but an oddly different color later in the year. The earlier fruit were chocolately-looking, definitely more brown than, say, Black Cherry, which is more purplish-black. They reminded me a great deal of Brown Berry at that stage. Later in the year? The Chocolate Cherry fruit then became a weird orangeish-yellowish-brown and just looked bizarre. Maybe it was the heat.

Paula, Woo hoo! I forgot about the Lee Valley Tools holiday catalog, which arrived here maybe a month ago. I'm glad you mentioned it. It is special and I do drool over it. It is one of the few catalogs that I don't leave in the stack on the coffee table. It is upstairs in the special stack of "most favorite" catalogs on my nightstand....so I can look through it before bedtime and then have visions of Lee Valley Tools dancing through my dreams.

Today's arrival is the catalog of Seed Savers Exchange. This is the fun time of year when a catalog arrives just about every day.

There isn't much I need to buy, but that likely won't stop me from ordering at least a few more seeds.

I've been too busy this week with VFD stuff to work in the garden much, but need to get busy tomorrow harvesting as much as I can that can be eaten fresh and preserved. A big cold-front is coming next week, and I can stay inside on those cold days while whatever is left of the winter garden by then just shivers and shakes out in the cold. That will be a nice time to squeeze in some time to peruse the catalogs in between housework and Christmas-type tasks.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I think there are 2 Lee Valley Christmas catalogs this year. Each time one comes in the mail, Al says that he hates to give it to me because it seems to always cost him money. LOL

I have several catalogs and although I need very little, I keep looking at interesting things. I need edible pod peas and will either plant Sugar Snap or Super Sugar Snap, but I am also interested in the yellow pods and purple podded one.

I plan to plant a lot of beans and cucumbers, more than enough okra, and probably fewer tomatoes. I would say that I will plant fewer peppers, but we all know that never happens. I eat peppers in summer like others eat apples. LOL

Dawn, Didn't you plant a yellow edible pod pea last year? Was it good?


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

They have finally started arriving in my mail box. I believe it was Saturday that I had five catalogs. Many that several on here reported receiving a few weeks ago have arrived in the last week. Still no Baker's Creek. I think I'm close to being done. I plan on purchasing some bean seeds from Remy although I have plenty already. Maybe a few seeds from Harris. I try to purchase what I used to from Johnny's from Harris as I just can't afford their shipping anymore. I need to finalize all of my lists. I need to get onion seeds planted within the next 7-10 days. Jay


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Carol,

I've grown two different edible yellow podded pea varieties the last couple of years and both have produced well and tasted pretty good. (To me, nothing tastes quite as good as Super Sugar Snap or Sugar Snap.)

I've grown one from Nichols Garden Seeds called 'Opal Creek Yellow' and one available from many different retailers called 'Golden Sweet'. I think I purchased the seed of that one from SSE. If choosing between the two, I think Opal Creek Yellow had better texture and flavor. I like the pink one, Spring Blush, about as much as I like the green-podded ones, and I haven't grown the purple/blue podded ones.

Jay, Shipping from some places has gotten ridiculous and it is driving me away from some of the bigger companies to smaller ones. I ordered a ridiculous number of packets from Remy and she'll get more of my business in future years. I didn't even need to order that much, but she had so many varieties that I've been wanting to try that I couldn't help myself.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I am seeing lots of diversity in the weather reports for the cold front that is supposed to arrive Sunday late, I believe. First, we were to get snow and ice; then nothing; then light snow and ice. I think it's too dry to do too much other than blow around a lot, like a white dust storm. It's the cold I won't like much, with the temps dipping into the 20s at night. Brrrrrr.

I am not going to plant as many veggies this year, not that I planted anything remotely close to the quantity you guys plant. I am going to do some perennials that perform as annuals in our area - the Caelsipinias - the red one and the yellow which is hardy to zone 7, but will bloom first year from seed. The red is not at all hardy here, but my neighbor, another plant enthusiast, had the red last year, and it was stunning! They are legumes.

Also some Pussytoes for the American Lady butterflies, Giant Milkweed tree, and a couple of native violas, and that's about it besides the tomatos, beans, and bok choi.

Y'all are much too ambitious for this slow moving nanny, but I love reading your posts about what you're growing.

Susan


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Susan, I love the appearance of the Caelsipinias. What is the Giant Milkweed Tree?

I'm not looking forward to the cold. While the temps in the upper 70s and lower 80s have verged on being too warm for this time of year, I'd rather have them than temps in the 20s. Hopefully we'll warm up soon after this cold spell passes.

I am planning to plant a lot more flowers this year than I have the last two years. The droughts have made it challenging to devote much space to flowers.At least when I'm growing fruits, herbs and veggies I can justify the cost of irrigation because our garden does produce a lot of food. I have oodles of flower seeds I need to plant this year before they get too old, so the veggies are just going to have to share space with them more than in the past two years.

For anyone who shops Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, their catalog is supposed to be delivered in December, but the website updated for 2013 yesterday.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Milkweeds, in general, are drought tolerant once established as you already know. The exception would be Asclepias incarnata, also called Swamp Milkweed. But even that is more drought tolerant than most people think. A. incarnata does well in clay soil.

Giant Milkweed Tree is not a native, hailing from South Africa, and other places like India, Hawaii, etc., where in can reach heights in those tropical areas of 30 feet or so. I like it because the leaves are large and kinda fuzzy, The new growth looks cottony white. It comes with flower colors of either purple or white. I think the purple is what is most often seen. They are pretty. This plant also goes by the common name of Crown Flower. The latin name is Calotropis gigantea. There is a smaller verson in that genera of C. procera. Here in Oklahoma, it performs as an annual, and gets to about 3-4' tall. It may or may not flower (needs an extended season of warmth to do so. Mine flowered the summer I grew it, but the flowers were not pollinated. The Monarchs love it just as much as the Tropical and Oscar milkweeds. The leaves are thicker and thus the plant provides more food for a hungry Monarch cat than the other milkweeds because they don't need to consume as much to reach their final stage of growth. It is a pretty plant whether it flowers or not, and the Oleander aphids are not as attracted to it as the other milkweeds, IME.

I'm attaching a link to a photo image of the leaves and flowers FYI. As all milkweeds are, the plant is high toxic, containing cardioglycosides, which are the chemicals that protect the Monarch larvae from predation, mainly birds. Spiders, mantids, and other bugs, are not affected by the toxins. I should always attach a warning to people who may want to grow these plants, but have animals or children that could potentially be exposed to these toxins.

Susan

Here is a link that might be useful: Calotropis gigantea or C, procera


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Thanks, Susan, for the info on the Giant Milkweed Tree. Wouldn't it be amazing if it could get big here like it does in tropical climates?

Milkweeds are incredibly drought tolerant. I think that the wild ones in the pastures here (they're the green-flowered ones-A. viridis and may be the same ones we called antelope's horns when I was a kid growing up in Texas) are often about the last thing still standing and green in the pastures when drought and heat have dried up everything else, either killing the pasture grasses and forbs or pushing them into drought-induced dormancy. Sometimes the wild nightshades are still alive at that point too. The green milkweed usually are blooming by May and sometimes remain in bloom as late as August. They are really invasive in cow pastures and will take over the pastures if those pastures never are mowed. In 2011, we lost all our milkweeds to the drought/heat, but in 2012's slightly milder conditions a lot of them stayed green. Even my butterfly weed (pleurisy root) flowered until August in 2012, which isn't bad considering the heat.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Twilley is my latest- I ordered one because of something one of you recommended. But now I don't remember who or what!

I have SO many seeds sprouting, things I sowed for spring- I'm afraid it was all for nothing if they are sprouting now. I hope I am wrong. Everything from petunias to milkweed, poppies, larkspur, echinacea, even lettuce and other greens are appearing. My timing so bad.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Betty,

Twilley has lots of good heat-tolerant broccoli varieties, and lots of great melons and tomatoes. Maybe when you look through the catalog, you'll remember what we were talking about.

Are your sprouting plants in containers you can move inside long enough to get them through this week's cold spell? You never know. This time next week we might be back in the 60s or 70s again.

I have gazillions of Laura Bush petunias sprouting all over the garden. They don't usually freeze when they are this small as long as we stay above 20 degrees. Below 20 and they'll freeze to the ground. Poppies and larkspurs that self-seeded are up in the garden, and so are Texas Bluebonnets down by the mailbox. In the garden, not only has chamomile sprouted all over the place, some of the plants are blooming. I knew eventually we'd get cold enough to knock some sense back into the early sprouters.

I likely will scatter handfuls of autumn leaves on top of the little sprouts tomorrow afternoon. If I tried now, the wind might carry the leaves away. Our first really cold night of this cold spell shouldn't be until tomorrow night. I know they keep talking about snow flurries, but that's one of those "I'll believe it when I see it" deals for me. I also could cover them with floating row cover, but it isn't going to protect the young plants enough if we go down into the lower twenties or upper teens.

We have more early sprouters this year than ever before and as I've watched them pop up out of the ground, I've shaken my head and thought to myself "y'all are ahead of yourselves, it isn't even winter yet".

I want to winter sow some flowers but definitely am waiting until after Christmas to do that. I do need to get busy though because I have some flowers for the Chocolate Garden than need at least 4 weeks of stratification before they'll sprout. If I wait too long, then that long stratification period will mean they take too long to get going and go into the ground either on time but very small or late but somewhat larger.

I need to stop looking at catalogs. Every catalog I look at just makes me want more to buy and plant more seeds, not that I have room for more plants.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Catalog To Arrive Is....

Osborne Seeds. It is such a gorgeous catalog that just looking at the photos brightens up a cold, windy day. They have some beautiful lettuce varieties as well as some tomato varieties I find intriguing. They have a whole "sun series" that includes not just SunGold, but SunLemon, SunCherry (I've grown that one), SunPeach, SunChocola and SunGreen. I need to buy those Sun series seeds and try them all. Maybe for fall. They also have a huge selection of summer and winter squash, among other things.

I've linked their website below.

Here is a link that might be useful: Osborne Seed Company


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RE: The Catalog of the Day Is.....

Johnny's Selected Seeds. I haven't had much of a chance yet to look at it, but noticed that they have the 2013 AAS Winner "Jasper" tomato, which was bred by the folks at Johnny's.

Carol, I saw the lunchbox peppers you mentioned. They sure do look like the little sweet peppers we buy at some stores.

I love JSS, but every year there is something that just totally shocks me because it is so incredibly expensive. This year that something is Salanova.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Dawn, I agree. Johnny's is sometimes so expensive that I just skip a year and don't order from them at all, but other times they have what I need at the best price, or they are the only supplier that I find that has that item. I ordered greenhouse plastic from them this year because the only other place that had what I wanted was out-of-stock. I have soil blockers that I bought from Johnny's years ago. When using the miniature block maker, I need trays that have smaller openings and more actual bottom to them so the blocks sit up straight, so I ordered those from Johnny's this year. Because they were the best source for what I needed, I also ordered a few seeds, but I rarely just place a seed order with them because their shipping costs are too high. It just doesn't make sense to me for companies to charge so much just to ship seeds, so I don't encourage those that do by giving them my seed business.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Carol, I agree with you. I only buy from Johnny's once every 2 or 3 years so that at least I am not paying that shipping rate as often. I love their varieties though, and their catalog is a better growing guide than half the gardening books available on the market today.

Today's catalog, y'all, is from NeSeed. Last year they had the pink pumpkin, Porcelain Doll on their cover. This year, they have an F-1 muskmelon called "Electra" on the cover, but inside they have two more dolls for everyone to enjoy. Both look a great deal like "Porcelain Doll" in terms of shape and size but they have their own color. Indian Doll is a deep orange and Blue Doll is a milky-bluish-white. If you've ever grown the so-called white pumpkins and felt like they were as much pale blue as white, then that's the same sort of coloration you see in Blue Doll.

I do think NeSeed has some of the most imaginative names for their varieties, including these names just from the pumpkin section: Mr. Wrinkles, Mr. Fugly, Flatso, and Hobbit. Just looking at those names makes me think NeSeed would be a fun place to work because somebody there has a sense of humor.

I've linked Blue Doll below.

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Blue Doll Pumpkin at NeSeed.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I'll have to check out those mentioned that I've never heard of......

Meanwhile, for those interested in native plants, Prairie Moon, has sent out their 2013 catalog. This is worth a good, hard look, beautiful photos, and just a ton of seed starting information, prairie restoration, etc., which this company has worked very hard on. The amazing thing, their seeds are still $2 a pack. I started ordering from them several years ago - probably 6 or 7, and their seed packs were $2 then. After accounting for extreme inflation over the last few years, they remain the same.

Prairie Moon also sells plants and plug trays (one species or a mix and match tray).

If you want to "go native", each seed description shows a range map so you will know if it is native to Oklahoma or not.

Seed germination is very, very good. This company is very popular coast to coast. Their catalog is like reading a book, there is so much information packed into it.

If you do order seeds, you will get a free packet of Swamp Milkweed aka Rose Milkweed, or Asclepias incarnata, with your order. This is native to Oklahoma, and a larval host plant for the Monarch butterfly.

Susan

Here is a link that might be useful: Prairie Moon Nursery


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Susan, Thanks for mentioning Prairie Moon. I went right to their website and requested a catalog. The last two drought years have been so hard on the native plants on our property that I may have to do some prairie restoration. I did a little of it last year in one area where nothing had reseeded in 2011 and it was a good thing that I did because that area was the only one that had enough wildflowers to look normal, although some other areas didn't look too bad. Others have nothing left...mostly bare, cracked ground that has been bare and cracked since July. I have put hay down on some of that bare ground to keep the soil from turning to dust and blowing away. This is the first year I've had to put mulch in our pasture! Usually it grows its own mulch, so to speak.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I am looking through Fedco's catalog.Out of Maine but an overall variety and many packets are a little over a dollar.

Of course in the back of my mind i am thinking i need to do germination testing on the binful of past year's seeds first........lol...yeah right :)


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I haven't ordered from Fedco in a while so they no longer send me a catalog.

Yesterday I did get catalogs from R. H. Shumway and J. W. Jung.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

ok well southern exposure has swayed me into being a customer because they have Gnomes on the cover,at my vintage/craft show before Christmas I found 3 gnomes.....i am on the left.my dh jeff HATES gnomes ,of course he also hates sock monkeys so what can i say???? anyhow,gnomes on the cover, well played :)


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Leava, I love the gnomes, and I love SESE too.

Today's catalogs that were in the mailbox are Harris Seeds and Burpee.

I haven't had time to look at either one yet, but neither one of them features gnomes on the cover.

Dawn


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RE: Most Recent Catalog Arrival....

The most recent gardening catalog to arrive here is Willhite Seed Catalog, from Willhite Seed Company based in Parker County, TX, in Poolville, about an hour west of Fort Worth.

You'll never see a huge number of the "newest", "latest" and "greatest" varieties in a Willhite catalog. That's not how they operate. As many of us have learned repeatedly, many of the latest, greatest and newest varieties to hit the market often perform poorly here in this part of the country because they were not bred with our specific hotter-than-heck and dry summers in mind. That's why you won't see a new variety in the Willhite catalog until they are sure it will perform well in the weather conditions their customers face in this region.

When I flip open a Willhite catalog, therefore, I have the assurrance of knowing they feature proven varieties known to produce well in this part of the country.

So, if you're always on the hunt for the latest thing, you may not find it here. However, what you will find at Willhite is proven varieties that perform well most years under the conditions gardeners face in Texas and surrounding states. I suspect Willhite's biggest customer is market growers who need reliable, proven varieties, but these same varieties perform just as well for home gardeners.

This is my favorite source for melon seeds in general. Willhite has bred many melons over the years, and many of them are still available from their catalog.

You can request a copy of their catalog at their website.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I order from Willhite a least a couple of times a year, but I don't have my catalog yet. Their prices are always great and the service is super fast. I see that the website is not quite finished for 2013 and doesn't contain prices.

During the winter I wrote to them and asked them if they would carry a pole bean other than Kentucky Wonder because several of us had discovered it was a 'Japanese Beetle Magnet'. I am sure that not all of their customers live in a JB problem area, but they know that many of us do. I see on the website that they have added Blue Lake FMIK pole bean this year. I call that CUSTOMER SERVICE. I will be a Willhite customer as long as I am a gardener.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Carol, That's a great story about Willhite. I am glad they apparently were responsive to your concerns. I'm going to order and plant Blue Lake FM1K just because they added it.

They also added a summer basil blend with 4 varieties in one packet. I like that. It sure beats buying 4 separate basil seed packets.

They also have added a new cowpea I'll try. It is called Carolina Classic.

They have reprinted a couple of great melon recipes in this year's catalog. One is for Watermelon-Jalapeno Ice Pops and the other is for Picante Three-Melon Salad. I can't wait to try them. I love mixing sweet and spicy flavors together.

When your catalog arrives, I bet you will not be surprised to see the cover sports a photo of an adorable little girl enjoying a slice of watermelon. : )

I order from Willhite at least once, and most often, twice a year--in winter for spring planting and in summer for fall planting. I'm a Willhite customer for life. There is something pleasing to me knowing that I am growing plants from Willhite seeds just like my dad, uncles, and grandfather once did. Sometimes when I am in a store down in Texas and see Willhite seeds in the store, I'll buy some seeds even if I don't need them, just to encourage the store to continue carrying Willhite Seeds.

It is probably silly to feel as sentimental about a seed supplier as I feel about Willhite, but you just wouldn't believe how many summers of Willhite melons (among other things) I have stored away in my memory bank. When we were kids, if we were eating a locally-grown watermelon, the odds are that it was grown from Willhite seed. That's a tradition I like to continue.

When I need seed in a hurry, no one else can send that seed to me any more quickly than Willhite too.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Dawn, I don't know if my request caused the change, but possibly it was one of many. No matter what caused the change, I think it shows that they are responsive to the needs of their customers.

One day I placed an order with them, and didn't order everything I had intended to order. I logged back on and placed another order. The next day I called to see if I could have the orders combined. They had already caught the error and combined the orders and had them packaged and ready to go.

As a child I had little interest in gardening so I don't know if my parents ever bought from Willhite, but I wouldn't be surprised. Every year when I look at their watermelons I think of my Dad because they always have Black Diamond and Charleston Gray which were my Dad's favorites. When I think of those days, I remember my mother in the garden, but my Dad always had a melon patch.

There are lots of suppliers that sell 'seed kits' these days which people buy to store. Some are real 'preppers' and others are just people who want to insure they have seeds available 'just in case'. I think Willhite is the perfect place to buy for that type of emergency because they have excellent prices on larger packs and you can buy just the things you want and not be locked into the supplier's choice.

Dawn, you were the one who steered me to Willhite years ago and I have been a loyal fan since. Thanks.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Leava: Thanks for mentioning Fedco and SESE. I've ordered from SESE for decades but not from Fedco although friends have ordered potatoes from them. I haven't decided where to order Irish potatoes yet. Fedco is very far north - I don't know if that matters with potatoes.

Dawn: Thanks for the updates. NeSeed is new to me. Looks like they have a nice collection of Italian vegetables so I asked for a catalog. My catalogs outgrew their original plastic storage box - I upgraded to a bigger box. Didn't find a link on the Willhite site so sent an email to customer svc to request their catalog.

Carol: I'm always happy to learn about a company that has exceptional customer service. I'm with you when it comes to Johnny's ridiculous shipping fees. Amazon offers free shipping on orders of $25 and frankly, I don't know how they do it. Shipping costs are determined by labor (pick and pack), weight, and speed. Pete and I have a book publishing business - when I want to boost sales, I send out an offer for free shipping. People respond faster to free shipping than to anything else.

To all who are reading this thread: I'm interested in your thoughts about melons. I haven't grown melons successfully yet. Two years ago, I planted seeds for melons, they appeared to be doing well before a tropical storm wiped out my melon and winter squash crops. Major bummer. Last year was a transitional year - I was making new raised beds near the house, moving things around. Decided not to venture into the still uncharted waters of winter squash and melons.

I'm ready to put a toe or two back in the waters this year. Maybe some smaller watermelons for the grandkids, some tasty cantaloupes, a few mid-sized pumpkins. Melons are one of the most frequently grown crops by our local farmers so they are plentiful, cheap and tasty (unless we have a wet season). I doubt I can do a better job growing them, but if melons are like tomatoes, our farmers don't grow some excellent varieties because they don't ship well. I'm interested in learning more about these special "niche melons."

Whatcha think?

Pam


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Pam,

To request a Willhite catalog, just go to the homepage. At the right is an image of their catalog cover. It has a little girl holding a slice of watermelon. Above that is a banner that says something like Request A Free Copy of Our Catalog. If you click on that banner, it takes you to the catalog request page.

What kind of melons do you want to grow? Big ones or little icebox sized ones? Let me know, and I'll suggest some varieties.

As with pretty much everything else in gardening, there are some melons that the commercial growers don't grow because the rind is thin, making them poor candidates for shipping. Sometimes market growers will grow them if they are not having to transport them too far to their local Farmer's Markets. Home gardeners can grow those. I used to grow big melons, but with a small family, I tend to grow just the little small melons nowadays. My personal opinion is that a fresh-from-the-garden melon always tastes sweeter to me than store-bought melons. It isn't necessarily that the melons at the store are bad, it is just that the melons from home are better. I also like to have melons available in a variety of colors, so when growing our own, I'll usually grow melons that have yellow, orange, pink and/or red flesh. I like having the variety of different colors.

I have a certain degree of concern about your high hurricane risk there. The worst thing in the world for watermelons (next to the coyotes who like to steal them!) is excessively heavy rainfall. It can make them crack and split and rot before they are ripe enough to eat. So, if it is more or less inevitable that you're going to get hit by torrential rainfall at some point during melon-growing season, you need to evaluate that risk and decide if you want to take the chance and devote space to melons. Even when torrential rainfall doesn't make melons crack and split, it can just kill their flavor by watering it down. Since my torrential rainfall is pretty much limited to any month prior to July (usually it falls in April and May, and only rarely in June), I normally don't have heavy rainfall at the time of year that it would harm the melons.

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Willhite Seed Home Page


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RE: Today's Catalog Arrivals Are.....

Territorial Seed Company, John Schleepers Kitchen Garden Seeds and Seeds From Italy (the latter is the US distributor for Franchi-Simenti Seeds of Italy).

I haven't had time to look at them yet, but I bet I find something I want in all three of them.....because I always do.

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Seeds From Italy


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

I received Willhite today and see several things I must have. LOL What a surprise.


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalog To Arrive Is....

Carol,

The day that the Willhite catalog arrives and you don't see something that you must have? That will be the day I'll be on the phone to Al checking on your health! : )

I have found a few things there that I must have as well.

The reason I haven't posted my 2013 grow list for anything other than tomatoes is because I keep adding to it so it is not yet finished.

Dawn


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RE: The Latest Gardening Catalogs Are....

Today there were four in the mailbox:

Farm-Tek: This is a source for all sorts of agricultural, growing and storage items--everything from large building and greenhouse kits to grow bags and seedling flats to poultry supplies to pond liners and shade cloth. This one is the big Winter 2013 edition of the catalog.

Select Seeds--A fine collection of heirloom and open-pollinated (and a few hybrid) plants and seeds, mostly of flowers but also ever-increasing numbers of berries and vegetables. If you are looking for flowers you remember from decades past, you may find them here. If you like to plant for the butterflies and bees, this is a great source of flowers for them.

Peaceful Valley Farm Supply--This specific issue is No. 2 of 9. It is the mini-catalog that features Growing supplies including floating row covers and PVC fittings for making hoophouses and low tunnels. I'm going to link their website below because I don't think they're very well known yet in this part of the county and I love this company.

I also got a Spray-N-Grow catalog. I've never purchased anything from the so cannot comment on their products.

Dawn

Here is a link that might be useful: Select Seeds Heirloom Seeds and Plants


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RE: The Latest One Is.....

Park Seed.

I think this may be about the last one to arrive. All the catalogs I usually receive are here by now. Whew! Now, I need to misplace them or hide them so they won't keep tempting me to buy more seeds.


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