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parsnips?

Posted by helenh z6 MO (My Page) on
Wed, Jan 19, 11 at 15:12

I have never tried one. I see them at the grocery store. Would the grocery store veggies give me a good idea of what home garden ones taste like? Does anyone like them?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: parsnips?

My Mother always put one or two in her vegetable soup -- and we also had them steamed with butter on occasion. Seems they were good, but I have always liked most everything. Where have you seen parsnips at a grocery store? I'd like to try them again.
Sunny


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RE: parsnips?

I thought I saw them some time with the produce but I haven't been looking. Seems like there were some at the farmers market but I wasn't interested then. On the Oklahoma forum they said they were a cool season crop. I always just thought I wouldn't like them and that is silly not to have ever tried them. Nothing much to do - too much time on the web. I need to get wood piled up close to the door in case we get what they are forecasting. All my dogs have deer bones. Where do they come from? Honey is so silly; he looks at me through the glass door. I give him a milk bone and he buries it. It is a waste but funny to me. There is a commericial about a dog worried about his bone and that is Honey. He is afraid someone will get his treasure but it isn't good enough to eat. If I give them to all dogs they have to eat them before someone else gets them. I am easily entertained.


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RE: parsnips?

I've only tried parsnips once (store-bought) and they were sort of like a hot radish. I tried baking them and it took a little of the hot flavor out but not enough for me. Things like radishes and turnips can vary so much in flavor depending on how they're grown, I shouldn't base my opinion on one try I guess.


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RE: parsnips?

Thanks Honey and Christie. I should try them at least once. I thought I hated asparagus for fifty years when I could have been growing it all that time. I love it with butter and salt. I had only eaten it canned as a child and that tasted awful. Reading about parsnips I realized I have never eaten them. They look like a pale dirty carrot.


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RE: parsnips?

Sunny I called you Honey, sorry. Honey is here with a clean tummy from walking in the snow.my little furry boy


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RE: parsnips?

That dog is a "Honey" if I ever saw one! So funny about him burying his Milk Bone --
Sunny


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RE: parsnips?

What a sweet face. I love that commercial. I'll think of Honey every time it comes on now.
I didn't realize how much the dog in the commercial looks like Honey. (Honey's cuter)

Here is a link that might be useful: Worry commercial


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RE: parsnips?

I love that commercial, Thanks Christie. I wonder what kind of dog that is in the commercial. The vet said she didn't know what kind of a mix Honey could be - laughed and shook her head. And last time he went for his booster, the assistance was talking baby talk to him. What are you? He is a smarty. Beau abandoned his deer leg when I opened the door a couple of days ago. Honey ran and got it and carried it off. But he is short and has to carry it high or it drags. He is so funny.


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RE: parsnips?

We had a dog we named Charlie once that looked just like Honey. He was a cutie too.

What is that blooming white flower inside the window? You see what I notice!

I have never tasted: parsnips, rutabagas, kale, Jerusalem artichokes....makes you wonder why. First, I don't know anyone who grows them.
I am going to try growing kale this year.


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RE: parsnips?

Of those you listed Glenda, I've only tasted Jerusalem artichoke. I planted one in a large container this fall too. I'm hoping it will come up in the spring.
I want to hear how your Kale does. It's supposed to be good for you. I've never tried Collards and almost bought some seed for it at Lowe's this week.

Helen - You can tell people that Honey is a "Benji" dog. I think Benji (in the movie) was a mixed breed and the dog in the commercial may be also. We adopted a pregnant stray once that looked a lot like Honey only she was darker. The puppies were adorable. When we put an ad in the paper to give them away, we described them as "Benji puppies" and got tons of calls.


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RE: parsnips?

Glenda the blooming plant is citrus, Meyer Lemon. It was a mistake I bought at Home Depot. I was looking for Jasmine which I had before and liked. Last summer it was outside and didn't get watered enough. It lost half of its leaves. It is fragrant and covered in flowers.


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RE: I forgot to say

The weed Jerusalem artichoke is a fairly attractive very large sunflower type plant. It is not for the formal garden but it is garden worthy in a sort of utility way. I think it could be along a fence or on the side of a storage shed or propane tank. In good soil it may be invasive but I let it in my vegetable garden and was able to pull it up when I changed my mind.


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RE: parsnips?

Does your Meyer Lemon bloom for a long time? I saved seeds from a store bought lemon awhile back but I don't know if the flowers would be as fragrant. Lemon trees are supposed to make good houseplants.

I put my Jerusalem Artichoke in a half whiskey barrel so I won't have to worry about it spreading. There are some improved cultivars of it that might be nice to try. I found an article that lists some different varieties. This is from ENotes.com Encyclopedia of Food and Cultures. The whole article is too long. I'll just copy the part about Jerusalem Artichokes:

There are five basic tuber types and a wide range of skin colors, from pure white, to red, purple, even brown. There are also discernible differences in flavor, but nearly all of the known varieties share in common a strong resemblance to the flavor of cooked artichokes, hence the name: artichoke of New Jerusalem. Most native peoples referred to the plant as a "sun root," which is botanically more correct. The Jerusalem artichoke has been hybridized with the sunflower to yield the Sunchoke, which is high in sugar and may eventually serve as a commercial source for sugar.
A number of Jerusalem artichoke cultivars are considered improvements over the knobby, hard to pare wild sorts. These include Challenger, French Mammoth, Skorospelka (developed in Russia), Stampede (developed by Ontario Indians), and Fuseau, a tapered sort resembling a sweet potato in shape which was developed in Egypt about 1913.


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RE: parsnips?

Glenda it was blooming when I bought it last summer and fragrant that is why I thought it was some kind of jasmine. It hasn't bloomed again until now. It has had buds for a long time - weeks but they took their time opening. I don't know how long it will bloom. It can't bloom much more because every stem is covered. I wonder if it will make fruit. Jasmine will bloom sporadically and one or two flowers opened perfumed my hall with my nose that can't smell flowers very well.


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Christie

Here I go again, I meant Christie. This plant has been tough because it is in the same pot it came in. Plants in small pots need more water in summer and it got no special care. Half its leaves fell off when I brought it inside finally and then it made buds all over. On the Oklahoma forum someone was talking about JA the cultivated varieties and they had big tubers. It could be that person has good deep soil. I never thought artichokes had much flavor. My sister brought a suitcase full of them once long ago. We boiled them and ate the petal things with mayonaise. It was good but not a strong flavor. The pickled ones in jars taste like the brine. I tried the little hard wild JA before and thought I'll have them to eat in a famine. The flowers are nice in a wild sort of way. It is all interesting to me and I hope your kids are participating in your explorations.


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~LOVE~ parsnips :)

I just ran across this thread. Helen, I hope you've tried parsnips by now. I had them first in England, roasted with carrots and potatoes. I fell in love with them!
...dice or slice them in soups and stews
...slice them like a large french fry and roast them with herbs and add a bit of garlic in the last few minutes
...slice them thinly and fry them like a fried potatoe in a bit of bacon drippings with onions
...even cut them thinly and fry them into 'chips'.
I dont find them hot but not all parsnips are created equal I guess :)
Not a big fan of radishes or turnips but OH how I love parsnips.
They are available here year round in all the grocery stores I visit. Walmart had them today. The ones in the stores have usually been dipped in a thin coating of some sort of waxy substance. It easily comes off though.
I grew them for the first time last year. They take a long time from sow to harvest and I started late. Needless to say, mine were a bit small but quite tasty :)
I want to plant them again this year but have yet to find seeds. From what I've read, if you wait till it freezes to harvest, they will be sweeter.
They dont take much room in the garden. I put mine in amoung eggplants, leeks, etc in a raised bed.
Have I sold anyone on parsnips yet???
What unusual veggies do you enjoy???


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RE: parsnips?

Hello, Nancy!

Well, they aren't very unusual but I grow and like pink eye purple hull peas, okra and Italian egg plant (purple striped).


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RE: parsnips?

I love asparagus and yes that was a wonderful parsnips sales pitch. I think you are a better cook than I. I have a rosemary plant in my hall a sale plant from last fall. I happened to snip a few sprigs and put it on some food I think it was chicken. It was surpisingly good. I am usually too lazy to use herbs. The parsnips with onions in bacon grease sounded good to me.


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RE: parsnips?

I grew kale last year and was surprised at how long it lasted into summer. I still have some in the freezer. I love it. I don't remember when I planted it, but I know I got plants at Lowes about the time they got all their little veggie plants out.

I tried pasnips I got at Walmart and thought they were quite bland. Maybe I got an old batch. ??


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RE: parsnips?

Ooohhh, I think my wish list just grew a bit longer..haha
-I love the look of the striped Italian eggplant. Last year I grew heirloom 'Applegreen' eggplant. They are quite small, mild flavor and dont require peeling. Plus they look cool, my grandsons loved them. The 5 year old helped me cook 'crispy rounds with red sauce'. He and his 2 1/2 year old brother ate eggplant parm so fast it was amazing :)
-gldno1- Pink eye purple hull peas sound interesting. Do you eat these fresh or dried ?
-Does anyone have suggestions on growing okra? I received some seed in a trade and have no experience with it.
-Isnt asparagus wonderful !?! For some reason I'm a bit intimidated by growing it though. Has anyone had success with it?
-Helen- I'm not a better cook. I have more time with the kids grown and all the inspiration from the cooking shows on TV. Until a few years ago I thought 'herbs' were what I had in bottles in the cabinet...haha I started just like you Helen. Bought a plant and realized I liked it...bought another...on and on. Now I grow from seed.(rosemary starts easily from cuttings in the summer)
We have 2 huge strawberry pots and most of the herbs grow in them. We bring them in before frost and back out in the spring. (I replant whatever didnt make it through the winter, mainly basil) They are in the sunniest window plus I use grow lights. My biggest success is rosemary. The largest one is over 30 inches tall and 36 inches across. Its 6-7 years old. Now, I rarely cook without using at least one herb. They make my simple cooking much more impressive :)
-teeandcee- I bet fresh kale is wonderful. I've only bought it in the store. I'm gonna try growing swiss chard for the first time. (got some seed in a trade) Any suggestions?
Yep, some parsnips taste better than others. They seem to loose a bit of their flavor in soups/stews. I prefer them on their own :)
I hope you ladies dont mind me on your forum. I'm from Kansas but love the Ozarks :)


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RE: parsnips?

Nancy you are very welcome on this forum; when I first started posting here everyone was very friendly and nice. I like your enthusiasm. I hope I can keep my rosemary going. I tried to grow it before and keep it in the house in winter. I lost it before, but this plant is doing well in front of the glass door. It is a little cool in the hall where it is. I love the smell of it when I brush the leaves. I haven't grown okra in a while. I think it likes the heat and is easier to grow than your eggplant. Bugs always eats holes in eggplant when I try to grow it.


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RE: parsnips?

Nancy - You've talked me into trying parsnips again. I need to put them on my grocery list. I don't think anyone will mind if you join in. Please do!

I have a couple small patches of asparagus, but my shrubs have been shading it more and more every year and it's not doing well. It seemed to be trouble free the first few years until the asparagus beetles found it. I'd love to try a named variety but I can picture my Bermuda grass taking over eventually. From what I've read, it's difficult to grow in a container or I would try that.


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RE: parsnips?

Thanks for the warm welcome Helen and Cristie :)

Helen, I dont know if you'll have this problem but my rosemary gets white fuzzys in march. I've found that a bit of baking soda and a couple cups of water in a spray bottle helps get rid of it. Also, I use half strength miracle grow each time I water. I read recently that rosemary likes to be root bound. And here I was thinking I'd need to repot. haha Gotta love the smell of fresh resemary. Its supposed to 'improve your mood'. Guess thats always a good thing :)

Christie, let us know how you like the parsnips. Hope your bermuda grass give the asparagus a little room.


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RE: parsnips?

Well, I am still having on/off problems logging in. Some days I just give up.

Yes, welcome Nancy. We need new blood to keep us fresh and active.

Here is my experience with okra. Don't plant it until it is very warm...and the soil is warm. Sometimes if I remember I soak the seeds overnight. For me the planting time is around May 20.

I eat the PEPH peas in the green or shelly stage. They are tiny little things. I still have some dried ones I need to hull for seeds.

This year I am planting a new (to me) eggplant called Slim Jim from Pinetree seeds. We did not like the old standby Dusky!

You all have me interested in trying rosemary again. I have tried a couple of the supposedly hardy varieties....and they weren't.

I bought some kale and we didn't like it; I am still going to grow some in the garden. Same for swiss chard...not bothering with it again. Some love both and they are very nutritious. I tried mustard one year.....same story. I think I will plant it this year for the chickens. Maybe they will like it. All of the above like cool spring weather. So that means late March to late April for me in my zone. I count my garden as northern Missouri for planting purposes.

My broccoli seed has not come up....now wondering if I put any seeds in the pots....will plant some more to see.


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RE: parsnips?

Welcome, Nancy. :)

As for swiss chard, I grew it years ago in Florida so unfortunately can't help you with growing it here. I did grow it in late spring/early summer there so I'd imagine it will do well all summer here.

If you all like greens, I grew beets one year in Florida and at the leaves rather than the roots. I hate beets but loved the greens. They weren't bitter at all. They reminded me of chard but a bit different. Maybe sweeter somehow.


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RE: parsnips?

Thanks gldno1 and teeandcee :)
Helen, you really started something with your parsnip question! I'm really enjoying this information.
-gldno1, I made note of your suggestions for okra, thanks.
I've not eaten swiss chard nor mustard but received seeds for both in trades so I'll give them a try.
I do enjoy kale in a soup with italian sausage, onion, garlic, potatoe etc.
You have some lucky chickens!
-teeandcee
I've never had beet greens either. I'll have to try that!
__Do any of you wintersow in recyclable containers? This is my first year. I'm trying to figure out when to plant all the different veggies. Guess I should get broccoli and such planted :)


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RE: parsnips?

I don't do winter sowing....my first experience wasn't too successful.

Check out the Winters Sowing Forum here and click on the FAQ at the top and you will learn a lot.

I think the idea is to plant them anytime in the winter and they come up when the time and temperature is right for them.


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sorry your WSing didnt go well gldno1. Now you have me wondering if I'm doing the right thing. I've been reading up about it for over a month now...collecting containers, etc. I've planted 28 containers so far. You're right, the Winter Sowing forum is very helpful. May I ask what your experience was like with WSing?
and by the way, I really envy you cause you can have chickens. We cant have them in the city I live in. *whine*
haha


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RE: parsnips?

I just tried one time...and some seed was saved seed. I know that wasn't a good trial. I haven 't done it again for several reasons. The main one is I have gardened here since 1992 and don't really need more plants. Another is I have the plant light stand that holds 12 trays and so far, that takes care of my garden plant needs.

I do think it is a good idea. I think if you need lots of plants, it is a great thing to do. Please don't let my experience influence you. I know lots of people who swear by the method.

Yes, living in the country does have its benefits....chickens and my milk cow.

Keep us updated on how your WS does.

Glenda


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RE: parsnips?

Glenda doesn't need to winter sow because she has a plant stand. Someone else here has a porch with windows; that may be Glenda too. I consider winter sowing a mental health cabin fever thing. It works for columbine and other things. I wouldn't pay $4 for 15 seeds from Parks and winter sow them. If you get seeds on the exchange or you save seeds from your garden, it is fun to do. You have to modify it for your area because we don't have snow cover all winter and we have fluctuating temperatures. I think some seeds work better being wintersown. I had success with parsley, rudbeckia, columbine, and poppies. Poppies come up early and I went ahead and put them in the ground; they might have done as well on their own.


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RE: parsnips?

I think you're right about the mental health aspect Helen. It sure helped me get through jan and feb with a lighter heart :) So far I've only sown seeds that I got through trades. I see your point about more precious ones.
Wow Glenda, your garden must be full and lush :) I've been in my home for nearly 10 years but a year after moving here I got Lyme disease and my health steadily declined. I'm not able to do the more strenous tasks any more. Things just take a bit longer but the joy of being in the garden remains :)
I'm trying not to get my hopes up about the success of winter sowing. Will let you know as things progress.
Glenda, you have chickens AND a cow!?! I'm SO envy you :)


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