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Jubaea Chilensis

Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 5, 10 at 19:20

I was thinking of buying a 5 gallon jubeae palm.It's on ebay and the seller said It would survive here.Has anybody tried one of these palms?There not suppost to like humidity in summer,thats not been a problem here in the past 5yrs.It doesent get as hot in summer as it use to either.We only hit *90f three or four times this past summer.The seller said there cold hardy to *12f,and doesent mind wet winters,is this correct?If anybody has had experience with this palm,please let me know what you think?They are $60 dollars for a five gallon,pricey for me,Im just a simple man with little funds to spend on landscape plants.I dont want to waste my money.Can anybody give me advice on if I should buy one or not?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

I've been tempted to get one of these in the past but eventually gave up. I'm in North Florida, and from everything I've read about them, they just won't survive here. I couldn't get Jubaea seeds to sprout either here. Most likely, the seller is just trying to make a sell by telling you it will survive.

There are Butia/Jubaea hybrids out there that would probably do better for you. Problem is they are probably a bit more expensive and harder to find at a good size. So, you'd most likely have to buy a small one and have it grow for four or five years before you can enjoy it.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

As you guys say, everything you read about them says they are more appropriate for Mediterranean/temperate semi-arid areas (similar to Calif.) than subtropical humid/wet areas (Fl., Southeast, etc.). I'll probably eventually succumb and add one to the collection (containerized). Supposedly, very good cold tolerance. But it sounds like they resent really humid, tropical summers. Cool/even chilly wet winters should be okay as it mirrors its Chilean Mediterranean climate, Med. summers though are warm to hot but DRY. If you do buy and plant maybe you should amend the soil conditions some to improve drainage.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

I think the only way it will do good is if its in a pot. That way it can dry out in the summer, and go inside in the winter. But not too many people try it on the east coast, especially in your zone, so I say go for it because we will never truley know unless its been done. It will need some serious protection in the winter, and very good drainage. Try to keep the soil drier in the summer so the humidity stays lower, but these plants really hate humidity and most of the east coast gets a lot of very high humidity in the summer months.

Good luck!


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

I was in Chile last year and saw several of the Jubaea Chilensis palms, and they were by far the most impressive palms I have come across. They may not do well here in Northern Virginia, but I am determined to try. Last June I ordered 5 seeds online, and also bought a 1 year old seedling through eBay as insurance. Two of the 5 seeds germinated by just planting them in potting soil and waiting (one month for the first seed and 6 months till the second one germinated). I've since dug up two of the remaining seeds and am trying to germinate them in baggies with sphagnum moss. The seedling is also doing well, having sent out 2 more spears in the past 7 months. Jubaea are advertised as being extreemly slow growers, and I plan to plant one in the ground at some point, but I'm not sure when yet. I'll also keep another one or two in pots. If you are unsure with spending $60 for the 5 gallon palm, you may want to start with a seedling (I think I paid around $12, most of which was postage). Good luck.

Dave


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Like mentioned above, they are from a mediterranean-like climate. I am in California and we (reportedly) have a mediterranean climate. I live in an lnland valley, where are summers are really hot and very dry. My Jubaea tends to be actively growing mostly in the fall, winter and spring. Then, it tends to slow down in the summer.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

They certainly are fascinating palms--the Big Tree Sequoias of the palm world. The trunks are unbelievablymassive--which probably helps with cold hardiness but may also be the issue with excessive wetness. After doing some reading on them I've got to get a containerized one going. Their trunks kind of remind me of Butias (I'm guessing they may be related botanically--also both South American in origin.)


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Speaking of their trunks looking like butias, they actually have crosses between Butias and Jubaeas. It handles our winters pretty much like a butia does, but the trunk is usually larger in diameter, it also grows slower than butias, but faster than jubaeas. They are pretty expensive Im sure, but it might be worth it.

Good luck!


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 6, 10 at 17:27

Hey Dave,where did you get your seedlings from?The reason I have been looking at these palms is, 1 there a feather palm,2 there tall growing palms.People told me when I started growing pindos,they wont survive here.Now people are growing them in NY city.Back then they were rated to zone 8b at the coldest,now I see them on the web rated to zone 6b.What Im looking for is a tall growing feather palm,butias only get 20ft at the tallest.I dont know of another type of feather palm that gets near as tall,and can take our winters.If anybody does please let me know.Thanks everyone for the advice.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

I've had a small one (with character leaves) in it's third winter, covered with mulch. It's not foliage hardy; I'm just fooling with it.


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Butia 6b?

Anyone who believes that is an idiot.
Irregardless of their recent popularity, Pindos still get pinhole damage around 14, and spear pull below 10.

Jubaea are beautiful, but we won't live long enough to see them mature. The ones in Santiago have been there since Pedro de Valdivia visited.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Jubaea chilensis is quite slow growing. In California, under ideal conditions, it take 18-20 years to start forming an adult trunk base. Then it adds about 10 inches of trunk per year. It will reach 25-40 feet in 35-60 years and may take up to 60 years before it first blooms.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 6, 10 at 20:53

I dont think there cold hardy to zone 6b either.You can look on diffrent web sites and they still rate the pindos to zone 8b on some and some say 6b.Where I live they are normally hardy enough to survive.Mine did see temps.last year of *8 for two nights,and it dident get out of the 20s during the two days.The third day our temps.went back to normal.One had spear pull,but all I did was douse it with a copper fungicide,after pulling out 1 spear.This winter we broke a 83yr record for the most days below freezing(5 days).I never had any problem with any of my pindos till this winter and last winter.The oldest one (10yrs old)got burnt pretty bad from 5 days below freezing,but it still has plenty of green on it.The smaller ones dident get burnt bad as my big one,I still havent figured that one out.You would think the oldest one would be more cold hardy.I will probley have srear pull again,and I will do the same thing I did last year.I dont know whats up with the past two winters,but Im ready for a normal winter again.Can I get a amen on that?LOL :)


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Pindos definitely cant handle a zone 6b without protection. Im in a zone 7 and have a pindo palm and its probably been in its protection more than it has been out of it. I havent even let my pindo in the ground see below 23F. Fortunately so far we have had a zone 8a/8b winter. I wouldn't let my pindo go without protection for an entire winter and wouldnt trust it below 18F.
Another thing is some nursuries rate windmill palms zone 3 or 4! Theres no way a windmill palm can go through any winter like that without serious protection and few people are willing to protect there plants that much. It can be done, but a windmill palm cannot even go through an average day in a zone 3 without protection and the protection will probably have to make the plant about 30-40F warmer than outside.

I rate pindos cold tolerant to the average zone 8b winter, and marginal in a zone 8a, but in the right microclimate it can handle a zone 7 with some protection, but there will be damage, possibly complete defoliation.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 6, 10 at 23:41

Can someone tell me how to add a photo or a link to a post.I put a picture in the photo gallery and thought I could copy it to this post,it dident work!!Please help.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

I purchased my seedling at eBay from "palmswholesale" whose eBay store is called Coconut Climber. He's located in southern California, and I was very pleased with both the seedling and the service.

Dave


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Okay, I broke down and bought a five gallon specimen--can't wait for it to arrive. I am planing on planting it a potting soil marketed for palms and cacti. Should this be enough or do I need to modify the mix some with anything? Any thoughts on potting size--do they like it somewhat tight as most palms or does this inhibit its notoriously slow growth even more? Also (know it's a while away), when it goes out for the season, can it take direct, midday sun in hot, humid conditions (90-95 F.+), or is part sun and cool better (aware they have heat issues with hot summers but would they prefer direct sun nonetheless)? Thanks.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 7, 10 at 11:37

If you got it from paul at coconut climbers on ebay it says ready to plant in the ground now.You got to remember there in cali.I go by what S.E.P.S. says,plant palms when you would plant tomatoes.Dont quote me on this,since they dont seem to like heat,I would plant it where it only gets morning sun.A place that gets sun up till noon,and afternoon shade.I would think this would work for a long time since they grow so slow,and if you live long enough you might get to see it form a good size trunk.Mabey this way you can atleast enjoy this palm for 40yrs or so.If you still want to plant it in a pot,I would do the same,sun from 8am to 12noon.Iv'e tried that potting soil from mircle grow for cati and it doesent drain that good,my cycads were rotting in it.I had to get them out of it.I by a potting soil called Jungle growth,and my cycads took off.I pull them out every once in while to check the roots and there very healthy,there 15gallon size.In summer I water once a week,I give them a deep soaking.This potting mix works better for me than any Iv'e tried.It drains well so the mix doesent stay wet for several days.Hope this helps.P.S.Im probley going to get one too. :)


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Oh no, definitely will be containerizing mine. This climate is super wet and the ground low and soft and almost boggy is parts--probably have more moss than grass in the yard. The only way I would even consider the ground is in a raised bed and I currently don't have one. Besides, I would want the Jubaea to put on some bulk before I did venture into planting it into the ground (I did this with the T.fortuneis--only planting when they were too massive for containers and they been going strong three years now). Thanks for the tip on that soil. I was using it just yesterday for some bananas (mostly M. sikkimensis) and I thought it looked too peaty. No way! I did that peat moss soil a few years ago with the citrus and had to replant every last tree.--Had the opposite problem--the soil NEVER was able to absorb water and always looked/felt super DRY--even with daily watering and rain. Yes, I went with the 5 gallon you mentioned. Good luck!


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 7, 10 at 14:48

If your soil is like that,I dont blame you for planting it in a pot.Paul told me they were ready to plant into a 15 gallon size pot,If thats what I was going to do.I would consider them like a oak tree.The saying goes that you dont plant one for yourself,you plant one for your grandkids.Because we wont live long enough to see it mature.If we get to see 30yrs of growth,its worth the money,for such a regal looking palm.Good growing!


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RE: Jubaea chilensis

Why all this talk about Jubaeas not liking heat?
They're from interior areas of regions 4 and 5 in Chile which sees plenty. Just because they're a popular palm in CA doesn't mean they require a cool Pacific climate to survive. Their native areas are like a dry z9.

The only real problem in the SE is that they don't care for humidity. By the time you get to z8b or warmer, you're in areas that tend to be humid.

If you're planning to live a long time, try one below the fall line in SC and GA.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis pic in anniston AL

jubaea can be grown in central alabama z8a! this one is at the anniston museum of natural history.

jubaea chilensis in anniston AL (dec 09)


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Wow plantaholic, thats a pretty nce Jubaea! It must be over 15 years old (probably not in the ground that long), but its looking pretty happy.

Good luck!


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 7, 10 at 16:26

Thanks for the picture.It gives me hope one will survive here.Anniston is half way between me and Birmingham,AL.Our climates should be the same.Do you know if its in full sun or half day sun?My house faces due south,but they get so big I was thinking of putting it in the back yard,or on the west side.But in summer the west side of my house bakes.I dont have any shade anywhere in my yard.Except in the back west side of my house.It's shaded till about noon because how the sun rises,from the east,but it gets the hot afternoon sun till sunset.Mabey on the east side?That way it wouldent get that very hot afternoon sun.What do you think would be the best place for it?


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

the palm has been in the ground for about 12 or 13 years, planted as a 5 gallon. i had a larger one in my garden that was killed by voles. ugh.

i would give them full sun or maybe a little shade. south side would be perfect, but they need excellent drainage and nice, organic soil.....thats the key in the SE from my experience.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 7, 10 at 23:32

Thats probley a good idea,my front yard is normally *10 to *15 warmer than the backside in winter.When the news tells the temp.for Douglasville,my temp. in my front yard is atleast *10 warmer.I think thats why I can grow pindos without protection.Iv'e tried Trachycarpus palms,but they get burnt in the summer sun.Thanks again.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Butiaman, give the Trachys another chance but in a site protected some from noonday sun. I have mine in the vicinity of some Japanese and Red Maples and the palms get filtered bright sun--without the burning. They so slow down in heat but on the pro side they start growing in earliest Spring and will show another growth spurt in the Fall. Good luck!


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

  • Posted by butiaman 7b Douglasville,GA. (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 8, 10 at 23:21

Dont get me wrong but every Trachycarpus fortunei I have start showing sun burn in late july and augest.I dont really have any afternoon shade.I have about 2 hours of morning shade,just in winter though.Its on the north west side of my house.The two problems with that location is I have a big fig bush there(which I love fig perserves).Two I have 4 pitbulls in my back fence.They pulled the bark off a big rose of sharon last summer.They tried fooling with the fig bush,but I guess they dident like the taste of sticky sap under the bark,they dont bother it anymore.Is there a Trachycarpus palm that take full sun all day without burning?


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

NJOASIS, i bought a 5g. one & potted it up to a 15g. & it never missed a beat! i plan on given it almost full sun since i live in the desert, so probably sunrise to 4:00 p.m.. i have a nice spot for it that naturally blocks out the late day afternoon sun! goodluck


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Do you think Zone 8A property could actually be 7B or 7A if plenty of trees, woods and forests in the area?


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

If your on the border of a zone 8 you can definitely be a zone 7. Just like there are warm microclimates there are cold ones as well. You just have to find all the good microclimates for planting tender plants and then all of the bad ones is where the less tender ones go. Zone 7 is still not a bad planting zone so you can find lots of interesting things to grow even in the cold microclimates of a zone 8. And also just because they say you are a zone 8 doesnt mean that your exact area is. The USDA zones have a lot of flaws and thats one of them.
Good luck!
-Alex


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

I tried growing Jubaea chilensis as 2-3 year old plants (3) and from seed (100 seed). All died, none survived, also germination rate 3 years later was just 4 seedlings. I will try once again, once more, but will buy a larger plant of at least 3-4 ft. tall and plant in the ground.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

Did they die from cold, heat, wet or dry? I know they grow in southern England which is cool and damp.


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RE: Jubaea Chilensis

I am growing mine in a container. It gets into a chilly garage for the cold months (dec-feb), then outside. Not the fastest growers but they are survivers.


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