Return to the Palms & Cycads Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Sabal domingensis

Posted by tropicalzone7 7 (My Page) on
Sun, Apr 25, 10 at 14:27

What do you guys think the cold tolerance and growth rate is on this palm? I just bought one which should be at a pretty good size. Are they faster growing than other sabals like sabal palmetto, or the same? Also whats the cold tolerance. Some sites say its about as cold tolerant as a palmetto and others say its a zone 9 palm. Ill post some pics when it comes in the mail later this week. I probably wont try it in the ground this year, but I would like to someday.

Thanks in advance!


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
This is what I found...

Location
This palm is native to the island of Hispaniola, a Caribbean island that is shared by the countries of the Dominican Republic and Haiti. There is is found growing on the dry, sandy lower slopes of the island's mountain range.

Culture
Hispaniola palm is easy to grow on most soils except those that are continually soggy. It has a preference for light sandy soils. Fertilize twice yearly in spring and summer for faster growth.
Light: Thrives in bright, sunny, exposed areas.
Moisture: Drought tolerant.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 9 - 10. May also be hardy in some parts of Zone 8. Jack's young palms have weathered 20 F (-6.6 C) with only minor leaf damage - and seem to be mostly resistant to the fungus diseases that strike after a hard freeze.
Propagation: This palm is easy to propagate from seed. Germination time is 2 to 6 months.

Hope this is helpful


 o
RE: Sabal domingensis

Thanks. I hear that they can handle down to 8F with complete defoliation so Im still not 100% positive if its cold tolerant or not, but all sites say it can handle at least 20F and my protected palms dont go below that anyway.

Also how cold tolerant is Chamaedorea microspadix. Most of my protected palms dont go below 25, but they do go below freezing quite a few times throughout the year. I hear they can handle 20 with no damage and possibly down to 14 and still come back. I bought one and Ill give it a try in a nice shady spot.
Thanks for any advice and if anyone has experimented or grown these palms, I greatly appreciate your help!


 o
RE: Sabal domingensis

Heres my sabal domingensis! Its a nice size for the price. No trunk yet (probably a few years before that happens). I like the look of the leaves. Too bad its not in the best microclimate, a pretty high amount of shade and the winter wind channels in between that area. But it will have protection during those cold, windy winter days and the humdity is high there so it will enjoy the summer. Its also planted closely to the house so maybe that will add a degree or two. Every degree counts!
Photobucket

I also got a new pindo palm to replace the old potted one. This one is a very light green color compared to the one I have in the ground and is also bigger even though it was the same price from the same seller. It seems really healthy. Heres a pic of it. It probably wont stay in this spot, but it will be there for now.
Photobucket

I didnt get my Chamaedorea microspadix yet, so heres a pic of another chamaedorea, my parlor palm. Not looking its best right now thanks to sun damage, but its in a shady spot and has new leaves comming up.
Photobucket


 o
RE: Sabal domingensis

Barbara(T7)your Butia almost looks more like a Eriospatha,wonder
if there is any chance?

Nice Sabal,hope it turns out to be cold hardy.

Your garden looks really nice,lots of color(-:

Hope you don't mind me calling you Barbara,sometimes the
nicknames get old with people you post back and forth alot with>(-;


Click for Fairfield, Iowa Forecast


 o
RE: Sabal domingensis

Jim, I dont mind using my nickname, but since my name's not even close to Barbara, it might get confusing. You can call me Al or Alex, or whatevers easier. :)

Im really hoping that Sabal Domingensis is cold hardy. From what I have been reading it isnt very cold tolerant, but with protection I dont think I will have that hard of a time getting it to go through a mild winter, but I will update on it! If it survives and turns out to be fast growing, it might be a good alternative to a sabal palmetto. Im pretty sure its faster growing than palmettos but not too much info on it. I know that the leaf span is much larger than palmettos.

I know that something's different with that pindo. I would be really happy if it turns out to be an Eriospatha, I guess as it grows this summer I will find out. It seems like the leaves are more upright and a big larger (not sure if that has to do with the age though). Also that color is so bright, most pindos are either green or blue or something in between, but rarely that bright looking.

Im also planting another windmill palm, this time in shade because I also really like the look of the shade grown ones.

Good luck!


 o
RE: Sabal domingensis

I got my Chamaedorea microspadix and it is in the ground and doing well so far. Its in the shade and gets only filtered light during the summer. Still it gets very warm there. Its a seedling and Im going to assume its about as fast growing as a parlor palm so it will be about 2 or 3 years before it gets to a really nice size.

Photobucket

As you can see in the pic its 80F and thats probably a pretty accurate reading since it is in the shade. Its warm out today (even though apparently its only 77F right now) and its going to be in the mid 80s on saturday and sunday. And the low temperatures for saturday and sunday are almost as warm as typical summer lows, both low temps are in the mid to upper 60s (and typical summer low temps are in the high 60s to low 70s). Then temps cool down into the mid 70s for next week but it looks like it will remain in the 70s or higher from now through all of next week.
Im looking forward to it.

Thanks for looking!
-Alex


 o
RE: Sabal domingensis

Be interesting to see how the Bamboo palm does.

I hope your Sabal turns out to be hardy that would be cool,no pun intended(-:

Yea,
growing one Trachy in sun and one in shade will be interesting,I have a couple planted in shad too,
the little guys that came back from not be heated this winter!

Interesting Butia for sure.

Al or Alex,not really close to Barbara-LOL

Sorry about that,sometimes it's hard to tell who the men and women are on this forum.

I guess I found out the hard way! (-;

Click for Fairfield, Iowa Forecast


 o
RE: Sabal domingensis

Lol, don't worry. On fourms about things both men and women are interested in, it's hard to tell what gender people are without a name or without seeing them.
I'm surprised that hardy bamboo palms aren't used that often as cold tolerant palms because apparently they can handle 20s with no damage and come back from the teens. I hope that it survives, but it's all part of the fun of growing palms this far north. They look very tropical, almost fragile and are a refreshing change from the "average" cold tolerant palms which are also amazing.
I'm happy your windmill pans are coming back from such cold. They are such nice palms and look very tropical in shade.

Good luck!
- Alex


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Palms & Cycads Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here