Return to the Palms & Cycads Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Hawaiian Ocean View/ Ranchoes

Posted by tristanpierson Halfway Oreogn (tristanpierson@yahoo.com) on
Mon, Jun 16, 14 at 14:44

To start off, I know it doesn't rain a lot and it's on an old lava flow. I could see myself moving there because I hate grass and would want my yard to look like a botanical garden, just plants and trees, no grass and weeds.
My questions are, do things like palms, citrus, bananas, and dragon fruit like the volcanic rock? Will they ever get city or county water to rely on?
I know that if i lived there I'd probably have to dig or drill into the rock where i wanted to plant something and add soil. that's okay. I feel like each of the plants will mean more to me because I will have to do more work to grow them.
I'm only 17, but I like to explore and plan my future. I'm my generations plant nut. :)


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Hawaiian Ocean View/ Ranchoes

Grasses are pioneer plants, they're often the first to move into areas. They provide shade for seeds and seedlings, trap soil and provide humus. As larger scrubby plants begin to grow they start to shade out the grasses. They provide more shade for seedlings that don't like direct sun in their early stages. Slowly even larger plants take over. It's part of nature's process of colonising barren areas. However, if any of those stages stalls due to lack of rain/moisture or whatever it might not develop further. And these processes can take a long time depending on factors like rain/moisture/soil, etc.

So you need to look carefully at the area and understand what is happening there now. It's at the stage that nature has reached and has stalled. You need to know what it needs to get the process moving on.

I'm in the middle of a process to get nature going where climatic factors had stalled it for many thousands of years. There's been a lot of trial and error, but it's all edging forward. Be prepared to learn from your mistakes, because no doubt there'll be a lot of them along the way. Good luck.


 o
RE: Hawaiian Ocean View/ Ranchoes

  • Posted by cagary zone 10 CA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jun 16, 14 at 23:50

Here's a much better place to ask your question. People on his forum actually live in HOVE.

http://www.punaweb.org/Forum/default.asp


 o
RE: Hawaiian Ocean View/ Ranchoes

Where in Hawaii is this? I know many people who's gardens were planted on a lava flow... most just trucked in 'soil' or crushed lava rock and planted them in that... had the additional advantage that way of keep the weeds/grass down (which do manage to pop up in old lava flows rather commonly). If it doesn't rain a lot, you must be referring to the Kona side of the big island? Most other areas of Hawaii have a lot of rain. Most tropicals seem to love the acidity of lava rock, though not true for all plants... you can adjust soil acidity and ingredients as needed if you grow all your stuff in imported soils/ or in planter boxes.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Palms & Cycads Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here