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Starter Tray & Kit

Posted by Valdo (My Page) on
Wed, Feb 26, 14 at 10:17

The worst thing in the world is feeling like a newbie at something you are passionate about.

I am thinking of getting this for some pepper seeds:

Viagrow 50 Site Pro Plugs with Tray, Insert, Tall Dome and Heat Mat

wondering if it is a good buy and would I need a light source (besides my window). If not starter kit suggestions are welcome.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

To get things to germinate you need heat around 80 degrees, 85 is perfect and nothing over. For seedlings you need it warm so 80 degrees is good. Nothing under 65. If you want your seedlings to grow strong, you need a fan for a light breeze to help strengthen and keep fungus and bacteria from developing. You need light. If you have a source of direct light coming through a window you should be fine. If not, go to menards or lowes and buy the shop light fixures that fit 4' fluorescent lights. If you keep these fluorescent lights 1-3" above your plants that will do the job. I would not worry too much about lumens. You can only get so much out of fluorescents so I would just double up if your not providing enough light or triple. I had 4 shop light fixures making a total of 6 fluorescent tubes and my plants loved it besides my temperatures were not warm enough in my basement so my Moruga Scorpions grew very slow and short. If you mix match the 6500k with the 3000k it will help promote faster growth. If your wondering what "k" is, it's the spectrum of light. Light comes in different spectrums range. The lower the number the more "red" it gives off and the higher the number the more "blue" it gives off. Red Spectrum promotes flowering and Blue promotes growth. Otherwise the it's the other way around. Sorry if this is confusing. Another thing that helps is surrounding your plants area with reflective material. I bought some survival blanket from walmart in the hunting section and it's only $2! Works great. The closer the reflective material is to your plants the stronger the intensity is to the plants. And don't forget that soil mix is a very important part as well. I'm not an expert at soil mixtures and understanding that too well but if you look through this forum or container growing you will find answers. I hope I didn't bore you too much. If I'm wrong about any of this info I'm sure someone will corrected so don't go buying all this stuff based off what I said. This is just stuff I've learned in the process. It's very fun though. Good luck
-Nick


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Hello Valdo.

I believe you are not the only one here passionate about growing peppers lol.

I guess I'd start by asking you how many plants do you want to grow? That could dictate the answers to some of your questions.

Anyway, the starter kit (HD version, I think) could suffice. Check out some additional solutions at the link below. They have this kit as well, and it has received some nice customer feedback.

While you're there, you might want to click and read the list of "10 seed starting essentials" found in the left margin.

Rick

Here is a link that might be useful: Greenhouse Megastore kits


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I think the following just about covers everything you said Morugaman. Now I just got to think how do I keep cats away from it.

Rick thanks for the suggestion

Here is a link that might be useful: Greenhouse Starter


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 26, 14 at 14:44

I would personally stay away from the starter kits that have the "plugs" of peat that you get wet and they expand. They are usually pure peat which isn't a good medium for starting peppers and then the fact that the plugs are usually exposed on all but the bottom, they can dry out extremely quickly which will kill a seedling fast. I used one of the little starter kits this year. Mine was 36 cells and they more commonly come with 72 - 1" cells and then a dome. I used Miracle grow seed starter mixed with good results. Don't use the crap that some of the kits come with because, like the pellets, it is usually just pure peat. At least the MG Seed starter mix has some perlite and other good ingredients. Use the dome only until the seeds sprout. Within a day or two after the first sprouts, you will want to remove it. I say this because you referred to one with a high dome in your post. That would lead me to think you might be tempted to keep it on until they got big....they won't they will die soon from a number of problems if you keep that dome on too long after they sprout. Usually the remaining cells that haven't sprouted will be fine without the dome until they do sprout or you could lay some clear plastic wrap over them until they do. And if you have them on heat, remove the heat shortly after they start sprouting as well.
Hope this helps more than confuses you,
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I agree with Bruce on the Peat pellets, seed starter mix and dome advice. I hate those pellets!

If you do decide to steer away from the pellet tray, Have a look at these two items from Amazon. Basically the same kit you linked to but with a 72 cell mix tray instead of pellets.

Tray and Mat

Light system

They're $79 and change with free shipping. Use the $5 savings to buy your mix ;-)

Just my two cents.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I've been using the "PARKS BIO DOME" system for over five years now.. After the true leaves set on I transplant to Jiffy peat pots and then straight into my outdoor pots when temps allow.

http://parkseed.com/product.aspx?p=06456&green=C91B57D8-DF0E-56EF-0B0C-7295B83DD02B


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

If you can only invest in one thing, I'd invest in some shoplights -- $30 max

You can get the seeds to germinate anywhere where the temps stay warm -- mid 80's. Use the paper towel/plastic baggy method and place on a DVR, hot water heater, even on top of your brand new shoplight fixture. Watch for taproots to emerge, get them in some small containers with some well draining potting mix, stick some plastic wrap over them, and throw them back up on top the fixture until the seeds emerge. Then pull off the plastic and get them under the light.

Kevin


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

That is one thing I am curious about. I have some seedling in a cup and a glass ashtray with plastic over them. Should I put them on a windowsill (colder) or on the fridge (warmer but no light).

Light or heat?


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Heat until they sprout out of the mix and then light.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 26, 14 at 20:22

What Ottawa said: Seeds need zero light until they pop through the soil. A little heat until then is the ticket.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Fridge it is, for now. Also started to germinate seeds using the plastic container/paper towel on my fridge too. All just trying new things and seeing what works.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 26, 14 at 21:06

That is how we all learn. Try new things. I am still trying different setups, soils, lights, fertilizers, etc....
Good luck,
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I looked and looked and this just seemed like the best bang. I confess the mini- garden under the light hooked me in.

Input?


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Looks good to me. But then again, I think I was the one who suggested the tray and light ;-))

If it doesn't work out for you, I'll blame esox07 (Bruce).


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 27, 14 at 22:02

huh??? I heard my name. But yah, that looks good except for a couple things.
I don't think the light setup will be adequate for more than a few pepper plants once they get a little bigger than seedlings. One 2 foot T5 bulb isn't much. Maybe 4 plants that are 6" tall. And for 50 bucks plus, you can do a whole lot better for a whole lot less.
Here is a picture of mine. I made the light supports out of simple PVC pipe for about 10 bucks maybe. The shop lights were $10 each for a double bulb 4' T8 shop light. I wind up needing three shop lights side by side by the time they plants are ready to go outside. I think that the bulbs, shop lights and frame cost less than that Amazon.com setup and I have basically 24 feet of light vs the 2 feet of light that you would have. Then, the heat mat is good except I would be very leary about using one without a thermostat. I would rather not use any heat than use a heat mat without a thermostat. You run the real risk of cooking your seeds/seedlings with out some control. Save the money on the lights and get a thermostat for about $35. Here is a photo of my light set up. I only have two of the shop lights in use now but there is room for three side by side. They are adjustable side to side and each end is adjustable up and down to accommodate different size plants.
 photo 20140227GrowLightSetup001_zps5f8adfac.jpg
 photo 20140227GrowLightSetup002_zps839e20e3.jpg

And if anything I told you is wrong, blame it on Greenman28 (Josh).
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Bruce & Company,

I commend your industrial level of gardening. I live in a single shotgun (its a house not a weapon) shack so do not have the room to go that big. If I had a basement I think the plants, brewing beer, comic books and tabletop games would not be able to fit.

I am quite a bit more modest, starting off with perhaps ten plants in pots in my back yard. For that reason I am looking at more a desk-top starter?


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Valdo: 2 feet of light is not enough for 10 plants even in Solo cups and 1 bulb would suck. By the time you potted up to 4" containers, you'd have room for maybe 5 plants.

Save your money, go down to Home depot, buy a shoplight fixture for T8's or 12's and a couple bulbs( 6400K daylight) -- 30 bucks max. Get a couple of 10" - 12" pieces of plywood, etc, put up a couple shelves, hang the lights from one and place the plants on the one below. Minimal cost, efficiently spaced, and you won't regret not having enough light for 12 plants from start to garden.

JMO

Kevin


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 28, 14 at 13:02

Kevin is right. that grow setup is good for about 3 plants max unless you plan on getting them outside within 4 weeks. That is a lot of money for such a small light footprint. But it is your money and your call. If you think you can make that work, then it sure looks like a simple and quick solution.
Good luck and keep us posted on the progress of your growing endeavors.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Well that brings me to another question. No, I am definitely not using all 72 cells, but do not the plants go from the starter cells to the pots? I plan on having them in pots not in the ground.

And Ill be honest, I'm about as handy as a bagful of thumbs


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 28, 14 at 13:28

Most of my peppers go from the little 1" cells in the starter trays to bigger 4" pots 2-3 weeks after they sprout. They stay in the 4" pots until it is time to go outside in the ground or mostly in my 5 gallon pails with 5-1-1 potting mix. So, when I transplant from the start cells to the 4" pots, my growing footprint under my lights goes from about 1 foot by 1 foot to about 2 feet by 4 feet. That is when the additional lighting is needed.

If you can find someone, they could easily build the PVC pipe light frame like mine or they could use inexpensive lumber as well. I am just afraid that you will be having to buy more lighting a month from now if you get that little 2 foot single bulb light.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Most people pot up at least once before a FINAL container or ground. For me, I start the seeds in paper towel/baggy method, place in soil in 9 ounce solo cups after they sprout, and then a pot up to a 4" container before I finally harden off and plant in a large container or ground. Some annuums, I just leave those in the solo cups until transplant -- all depends on the weather.

If you're not very handy, just get one of those plastic shelving units that you snap together and screw the chains from the light fixture into it... voila! Obviously you would want to get one 4 foot wide at least.

I would find slapping up 4 "L" shaped shelving brackets and a couple pieces of plywood(Home Depot and Lowe's can cut it to specifications) a whole lot cheaper and easier(for me). Surely you can take a hammer and a nail to find the studs. You can usually find them by tapping the hammer on the wall and listening for a deeper thud. Measure 16 (12 or 24, sometimes)inches over from finding the first stud and you'll find the next stud and so on. Or you could just google "video installing shelves."

Good luck.

kevin

This post was edited by woohooman on Fri, Feb 28, 14 at 13:51


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Bruce and Kevin, I agree you could whip together a cheaper solution that would accommodate a good number of plants for a few to three months inside.

But given Valdo's very limited space, desire to grow out a limited number of potted plants and his location in zone 9 (a or b?), I assumed he could get buy with the T5 (granted two would be better) for his starts until he potted up 3, 4 or 5 weeks after they sprouted. He could then begin hardening them off. No growing inside under lights for an extended period of time like us zone 4's and 5's.

I presently have three trays of 18 x three inch pots under two three foot T5's and they're doing just fine after four weeks. I figure they'll be good there for another 3 maybe more weeks.

Like I said, I assumed. I could be way off base thinking Valdo could get his plants out under real light sooner than later. My only experience is shivering under grow lights in zone 5a ;-)


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 28, 14 at 16:54

Yah, Ottawa, you are right. I was assuming he was in a colder climate than zone 9. That is nearly a year round growing zone so time under lights should be pretty limited.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Bill:

Maybe zone 9 Florida, but even here in 10a SoCal, it's too cool at night to let mine out until mid march for hardening. I've tried planting mid march and the plants just sit there waiting for the soil to warm. I still like to let my baby superhots get 10-12 weeks inside. We just get to transplant earlier than you.

To each their own though -- you zone 4 guys I've learned a lot from, so I'm not going to argue TOO much.

Kevin


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Hey guys, you're being to kind. You're making me nervous!

Bruce, I only knew Valdo's zone because I sent my new friend some seeds.

Kevin, really, too cool at night in your zone? I guess I always assumed in zones 9's and 10's the nights would be at "least" in the low 50's. My bad for assuming. I learned something, Thank you.

Bill

p.s. is it just me feeling funny about talking about Valdo's plans without him involved [smile]


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Zones, Zones, Zones

Tis all about zones. I am in the deep South, any deeper and I'd be underwater (and have been)- New Orleans. It is a blistering heat so I was thinking once they outgrow their cups they can go outside, inside IF there is a cold night (and I mean a hard freeze) I am starting to think it is TOO hot here, get a lot of wilting I say.

But I showed the order to the friend that is growing me a few peppers, and he said that is more than enough to start. I guess he knows the heat here and the limited space. Ottawapepper thanks for defending my geography and I congratulate y'all for the passion that you pursue the pepper!

O


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Valdo - the setup you outlined above is great. Having lived in NOLA for 4yrs temp issues aren't that much of a concern. I use the Hydrofarm (7" high dome) kit myself. Plant in dome, 3wks later into 4" peat pots, and then move into my heat/grow room. If you plant next week, you should be good to put plants outside come end of month.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Valdo, welcome back ;-)

Yes, your zone can be important relating to advice given here but, no one defends one zone over another. Just sharing and learning. Kevin (woohooman) and others in or close to your zone will be able to give you the best advice as you grow your plants out.

By the way, I chuckled at your shotgun shack reference. Made me think about the Talking Heads song Once in a Life Time.

Bill

This post was edited by ottawapepper on Fri, Feb 28, 14 at 19:16


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Bill: actually it is high 40's and low 50's nights right now here. But for seedlings, I feel they will fare better until middle of march in a 75 degree room and 18 hours of light. Normally, I would be just a couple weeks from hardening. But, this year(because of the drought) I was contemplating planting anything at all, so I just started a couple weeks ago. My annuums will probably be ready to harden by April and the daytime temps are going to be fine in March, but I'll do the controlled environ for them until it's nice and spring like.

75-80 degree days are fine, but for seedlings, I believe, you want the soil and night temps to warm up too. Or they'll just sit there waiting.

Kevin


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Kevin,

I can't argue with your growing system or your past results. You know what works best for your location.

I do share your concern about the drought you're experiencing this year, not a good sign of things to come. I'll happily take the snow, cold and short season compared to your water shortage.

Let us know if you come up short on pods at the end of the season. I'm sure we could fill in any gaps ;-)


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Got my kit, waiting for the lights. Got a few questions.

Using the plastic container method (highly highly successful) Can I use this to continue seeds that have already germinated? They have white tendrils coming out, so can I put some dirt and grow them in these cells?

Thanks again for all your help, comments, suggestions, muses and encouragement.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 12:33

When you ask: Can I use this for seeds that have already germinated, I assume you are asking about the seed starting mix. I would say you probably can, but I would also say that you should upgrade them to a more porus type soil within a couple weeks after germinating. That seed starting mix is probably 90% peat which works good for germinating as it holds moisture on the upper layer where the seeds are but it isn't the best for larger seedlings. If you really want to use that, then I would add a significant amount of perlite to it when you transplant.
Good luck.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I thought germinated seeds (with the white tendrils) but them in the station then to the permanent pots. I am not sure how to change the soil on a germinated seed.

Further for seeds that I am to receive, should I use the container method (which wow does it work for germinating) or put them straight into that germination station and use the above soil?

I plan to put the germinated seeds with the potting soil I use and the non-germinated seeds that arrive with the starter mix.

This is the third time I have tried to grow peppers and it seems it is really working for the first time. This is so encouraging and promising!


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Off for Carnival this week, got the ol' vacation insomnia at 3 in the morning. Surfed the internet, found making seedlings out of egg cartons, decided to try it on old scotch bonnets and other peppers seeds I got from Burpee (try to keep the groaning down) just to see what happens, just to get my hands dirty (literally). Note the 3am slippers were on. Allow me to also add that these were seeds that I considered 'dispensable' or my guinea seeds.

Commentary?


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 7, 14 at 20:29

Valdo: Hey, why not? I don't mind buying seeds from the seed racks if they are the common varieties. Also, that egg carton idea will work fine but two cautions: 1) Those cells are pretty small so be prepared to transplant them fairly quickly after they sprout and 2) since they are small and also cardboard, they could dry out quickly so you need to keep your eye on them.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Has anyone tried the t-5 ho. I know they grow corals with them but for individuals that have space issues it might be a solution. Theres a link to check it out and the bulbs are 10 bucks a pop.

Here is a link that might be useful: t-5 ho


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I"m really nervous I planted the cayennes too deep. I filled each cell 3/4 of dirt, placed the seeds on top, and then added 1/4 dirt on top of the seeds. I'm wondering if the dirt packed down too much and is inhibiting the sprout.. And/or, the moisture isn't getting deep enough to reach the seed.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 8, 14 at 12:58

PEPS22:

OK, first of all, relax. Not the end of the world. Here is what you should do. Replant the Cayennes. Plant them 1/8th to 1/4" deep. Use a commercial seed starting mix. Miracle Grow Seed Starting mix is readily available and is what I used this year with good results. When you prepare the soil mix, get it thoroughly wet all the way through BEFORE you put it in the containers. It should be damp, but not soaking and definitely not dripping. Put the soil in the container, then poke small holes in the soil about 1/8th inch or so deep, and drop in a seed. I plant 4 in each container and cull the extras later on. Then lightly cover the seeds. Make sure you cover the containers somehow. Either in one of the commercial grow setups with a lid or you could put clear plastic wrap over each cell. THis keeps the humidity up and keeps the soil from drying out and also helps retain some heat. Once the seeds start sprouting, remove the cover and any extra heat.

So, if you are worried, simply replant with new seeds. You can keep both until you know if the first batch is going to make it or not (14 days would be my limit with Cayennes). But if they don't come up, you will already have the new batch going and not lose much time.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Heating pad seems to be working great, made a real rain forest of the Tupperware.

One question is it safe to leave on when leaving the house. Don't want to have a candle incident!


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Alright got all the parts. I think this is answered above but here goes, do I need light over the dome BEFORE the seedlings pop out of the ground or do I put the light only AFTER they pop out of the ground?

Right now I have a towel under and over the dome to help retain heat. But I wonder if they need light or only after they emerge?

This post was edited by Valdo on Sat, Mar 8, 14 at 17:47


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Hi,

No light until you have sprouts.

As for leaving the pad on while away, I have never worried about mine.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I germinated my seeds in a container, so some are showing signs of emerging. What does one do if some pop and some have not yet?


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Alas the state of my growing, love the lamp. One lone scotch bonnet, hoping it will have friends soon.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 8, 14 at 22:51

I pull the heat as soon as the first few pop. Maybe wait an extra day or two but you don't want to leave it on too long. Most of the other seeds have already germinated and will pop in a day or two so the heat isn't so important. You also want to remove the humidity dome soon after they start sprouting. Otherwise you will wind up with all kinds of problems such as mold and fungus gnats.

Do you have a thermostat on the heating mat? If not, do you use a thermometer at all to test the actual temperature of the soil? If you don't, you run the risk of cooking your seeds/seedlings if the heat mat is on without any kind of control or monitoring system.

Good luck and put up some photos.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Four or so have popped up, others are dormant for now.

So do I move the humidity dome when one or two have popped? That is the situation.

I am not using a thermostat, this may make many flinch but it feels warm. I plan on putting it with the lone bonnet in the next day or two as you said. Since most of the seeds were germinated in containers previously

This post was edited by Valdo on Sat, Mar 8, 14 at 23:20


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 8, 14 at 23:18

I am not sure how many you have under the dome but when you say only two have popped, I am assuming that is only a small percentage. I would give it another day or two with the dome. Then remove it. If you are using containers that are individual, you can remove the ones that have sprouted and leave the rest, but if you are using something like the small multi cell starter trays, then I would give them another day or so, then remove it. You can also put some clear plastic wrap over the ones that havent sprouted yet. I usually just remove the lid after about 1/4 of them sprout and the others sprout soon after.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

It does not stop evolving:

Scotch bonnets, Jalapenos, Habaneros, Chocolate SB and Fresnos. Yes, they are under the light.

I want to say I like planting a lot more in individual cups- I find the giant trays very cumbersome. And I am a solid advocate of pre-germination, the ones in the carton have pretty much all been pre-germinized.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

And here is another batch for the heat pack...

(How do you get two pics in one post or is it a photoshop thing?)


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

esox, a bunch of cayennes sprouted this weekend, with a few cells that are still empty. I'll give it 3 more days and hopefully each cell will have at least one seedling.

I love your growlight setup. I bought a jumpstart growlight system, which is basically a commercially-bought T5 light and structure to hold it up. Unfortunately, they only give you one skinny t5 light, and it is not enough to adequately light one standard seedling tray (the outer parts of the tray don't get enough light). I have them in a huge south-facing sliding door window that leads to my patio - I'm hoping that's enough light between the two sources. It's 8-10 hours of sunlight a day.

I'd love to put together your setup next year - the problem is I don't have adequate tools to cut PVC pipe.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 9, 14 at 15:02

PVC pipe is basically plastic. You can cut it with a simple saw.
Bruce


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Mold Panic?

I can't tell if these are scotch bonnet seedlings or mold. I have these in cups with organic starter soil in a Burpee starter shell (the black tray and overlay). Wondering if the environment is just too wet.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 10, 14 at 16:42

I am going to go with Mold. Maybe even moldy seedlings. Do you have drain holes in those cups? What kind of soil is that and how wet is it?
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Got drain holes and using Espoma Organic Seed Starter. Never again will I pre-water it because it's pretty wet- maybe even muddy.

Thinking about uncovering and putting it under sunlight- by the window.

Ovy

This post was edited by Valdo on Mon, Mar 10, 14 at 17:05


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

I have been off while using the Heating mat on the tupperware. No problems and no overheating. Today I have a full eight hours and am spending the night at a friend's house. Is there any risk or precaution to leaving the heating mat on for that time. My loft is warmer than the rest of the house but we are hitting temperatures overnight of 50 and 70 during the day.

Advice, warning?

O


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 14, 14 at 12:58

The heating mat can be left on 24 hrs a day until they start to sprout as long as they are not getting too hot. As long as your plants have not been getting over heated in the past when the heating pad was on, then it should be fine while you are away over night.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Here is an update. Everyone is growing (some of you may have been correct the light may not be enough). But I am wondering is it time to get out of the eggcartons or even the white cups? I know it says everywhere to wait until they have three sets of leaves, but will this be big enough?

Also from this do I grow straight to permanent pots outside or an intermediary red cup classic. So happy that the scotches and the chocolate variety (thanks Ottawapepper) are doing nicely!


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 15, 14 at 21:11

Looks like you got it going on. Good job.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Found some mold forming in the egg carton, took it off and it seems better. A word of caution to those using eggcarton, the carton could become moldy real fast!

This post was edited by Valdo on Sun, Mar 16, 14 at 14:44


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

It seems my germination went much better than I had thought. Not sure if I should go to red cups or can they still stay in the carton/bathroom cups? Beyond that when can they go to permanent pots outside?


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Dunno. Where are you? Please update your profile.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

9B, Southern Louisiana. Still gets into the upper 40's sometimes at night.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 17, 14 at 17:44

Upper 40's is fine. When I get mine out, the average lows at night are mid 40's. The 40's are not ideal but they will be fine with lows in the upper 40's. They will get more out of the daytime sun and heat than they will lose at night with temps above 45. Right now, 45 isn't even our average high for the day.
Bruce


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

Would that include in pots? I talked to a fellow pepper-head at work and he says just keep doing what I am doing, far too young to move at this stage of the game.

Patience is no doubt a gardener's best ally.


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RE: Starter Tray & Kit

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 18, 14 at 0:08

I grow all my peppers in containers. They go in a green house in April and by the end of may, they get booted out. But if you have room and resources to keep them in a bit longer, then by all means do so. The cooler nights will tend to slow their growth anyway. It isn't a big deal if the temps are staying above 45 or so, but 55 and above at night is ideal for peppers. I am not sure how big your plants are right now but it is better for them to be a little bigger when you get them outside anyway.
Good luck,
Bruce


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