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Transplant shock...

Posted by jutsFL 9 (My Page) on
Sun, Feb 16, 14 at 18:31

The selected plants I put in today did not like the adjustment! I'm really hoping they start to perk back up. They started to look like this just about 20 minutes into the process...


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Transplant shock...

A closer view here. They all went from really vibrant and firm to this droopy mess almost instantly.


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RE: Transplant shock...

How did you get those buckets to stick on the ceiling like that?


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RE: Transplant shock...

Never mind the pots sticking to the ceiling... how are you keeping the potting mix in the pots???

Seriously, the should bounce back fairly quickly. They'll probably look fine tomorrow morning.


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RE: Transplant shock...

I take it the pics are upside down for y'all :)


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RE: Transplant shock...

Did you take the time to "Harden" them before transplanting ?


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RE: Transplant shock...

Water them shortly before and immediately after transplanting.
JMO


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RE: Transplant shock...

I never water before -- it's easier to scratch the rootball. But yes, water thoroughly after.

Like abnorm asked, did you harden off? If not, no worries, just do it now. If it's warm right now where you are, keep in the shade. for a day or 2. Then gradually introduce them to the sunlight a little at a time for the next couple weeks. Start off with an hour, then increase an hour per day for a week or 2.

They'll bounce back in no time.

Kevin


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RE: Transplant shock...

They look a bit better as of now, about 5:30 am here in FL. My plan is to harden them in this spot on the patio, it's shaded and protected from the wind. I was thinking this would be enough for a few days? Plan was to move them to the back yard in the sun afterwards.... Bad idea?


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RE: Transplant shock...

Not a bad idea, but not a good idea. Gradually get them a bit more sun each day. Yes, it's going to to a pain in the ass moving the large containers back and forth.

Look at them like babies -- you start out feeding them pulverized veggies. Then, you cut up their meat in tiny pieces. Eventually, they're ready for a thick ribeye with knife and fork in hand.

That's the thing about hardening off -- you don't want them to be protected the whole time. You gradually expose them to the harshness of nature and then one day they're strong enough to endure that harsh world of stiff breezes and full sun.

Kevin

This post was edited by woohooman on Mon, Feb 17, 14 at 14:55


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RE: Transplant shock...

Did i miss something here? He said nothing of sticking them directly in the sun, they were just transplanted. What do hardening off and transplanting into another pot have to do with each other? If I missed something in the original post all 5 times I read it please excuse my ignorance.


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RE: Transplant shock...

Did i miss something here? He said nothing of sticking them directly in the sun, they were just transplanted. What do hardening off and transplanting into another pot have to do with each other? If I missed something in the original post all 5 times I read it please excuse my ignorance.


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RE: Transplant shock...

thepodpiper: Per the OP's last post, he never hardened them off. Which would be fine if they were just potted up and still under lights, but now that they're in their final pot, now is the time to gradually harden them off. He should've done it prior to transplant, but he can't undo what's been done.

Kevin


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RE: Transplant shock...

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 17, 14 at 15:07

Transplant shock??? I think they are confused about having to grow down ward. You really shouldn't be so mean to your little babies. I liken this to shaken baby syndrome. How would you like it if some one tied you upside down by your feet. I dont think you would thrive either.

If you want to harden them off, I would wait a few days after transplanting. The shock of transplanting and then mother nature might be a bit much all at once. Give them a few more days indoors. Then give them a couple hours outside in the shade for a couple days, then up it to a few hours in mottled sun for a few days, then up it to limited direct sun for a few hours while increasing the overall time outside.
Also, don't forget that it is not just sunlight that has to be accounted for. Those seedlings have been in a controlled environment with little to no wind. Their stems are not hardened to with stand even 10 mph winds. The first several days, make sure there is little to no wind or make sure they are protected from it. Then, just like the sunlight, gradually increase their exposure to the wind along with the sunlight.
Bruce


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RE: Transplant shock...

"Did you take the time to "Harden" them before transplanting ?"

This was asked before any mention of final resting place.

This is jutsFL's last post

"My plan is to harden them in this spot on the patio, it's shaded and protected from the wind. I was thinking this would be enough for a few days? Plan was to move them to the back yard in the sun afterwards"

So my Question is, what does hardening off and transplanting have to do with each other?


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RE: Transplant shock...

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 17, 14 at 15:38

podpiper, hardening off and transplanting are two separate animals so to speak. The can be done simultaneously, but I do not recommend that. What I normally do is harden them off before I transplant them to their final summer containers or garden spots.
Bruce


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RE: Transplant shock...

Thanks esox, I'm well aware of what the 2 r. I was wondering mostly why it was asked if the poster had hardened them off when all he did was transplant seedlings with no mention of sticking them out in the elements.


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RE: Transplant shock...

PodPiper....I asked that ......"Did you take the time to "Harden" them before transplanting ?"

This is actually a continueing conversation from several previous threads.......

We know his plants have been inside the house in a "box" under lights ......Now they're outside on the patio.....Orlando temps lately range 40-75

I harden my plants before I transplant....I never have transplant shock planting in 511 mix

doug


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RE: Transplant shock...

My rookie mistake of thinking transplanting and hardening at the same time has been realized... Nonetheless, they are back porch dwellers at this point. They are very protected in their spot for now. I'll give them a bit more time than I intended in this spot, and they seem OK for now. I will definitely heed the advice of increments of sun and wind exposure! I hope they end up ok! As for the remaining plants (still in my box), I will harden before the transplant.

There is one particular plant I am worried about (scorpion). Upon the transplant I realized that the stem was compromised due to wet conditions in the solo cup - the leaf cover prevented air movement from my fan and it looks rather bad, and weak...the plant looks great though. I think I may be able to save it if I stake it really solidly, but I've been known to be wrong before :)


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RE: Transplant shock...

Lots of misinformation going on in this thread so I will just leave it alone.


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RE: Transplant shock...

What misinformation? I see none....

The reason I would have asked if they'd been hardened off is because the leaves look so delicate and wilted - beyond what one might expect from the wilting associated with transplanting (due to the roots being "offline" while they re-establish themselves in the new mix).

I think it's a perfectly valid question, and in fact was the *right* question to ask to explain the current state of the seedlings (as pictured).

Josh


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Transplant VS. Hardening

Well I have to agree. If I were reading this thread cold, I would have thought that hardening off before transplanting was the recommendation.

Let's just be clear that the two are unrelated.

Dennis


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RE: Transplant shock...

Sorry again about the confusion of the original post, but either way, a wealth of knowledge has been gained. My first 'from seed' grow has definitely been a learning experience. Nothing at all like taking a bunch of starters from the local nursery and simply letting them loose outside!

They have adjusted well as of now (still have about 6 or so in the grow box). I took them outside for few hrs of light today and they wilted rather quick again. I'll keep it up though... The process is just going to be much slower than I originally thought.

Pretty happy with how they look now though!


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