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NuMex Joe E. Parker

Posted by sworegonjim none (My Page) on
Wed, Mar 9, 11 at 13:38

I am fairly new to growing peppers, but I am trying to grow several varieties this season. I have about 3-dozen sprouts coming along fine, mostly seeds from The Chile Institute. Very mild SHU compared to most of what I see here. I'm getting more adventurous, slowly but surely.

This year I want to fire roast, stuff, can, freeze, make into sauces, salsas, hot sauces, etc., a variety of peppers.

I have read the "Joe E. Parker" is one of the best tasting and versatile of the large green New Mexican Chiles. Any comments and personal opinions would be appreciated. Photos of plants and fruit would be great.

Thanks!

Jim G


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: NuMex Joe E. Parker

If you like mild, the Joe E. Parker is one of the best. You may also like the Heritage Big Jim. The HBJ is a bigger, more flavorful chile that has a little more heat. But here is a pic of some ripe Joe E. Parker pods I grew last year.

Here is a link that might be useful: Joe E. Parker Pics


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Great photo

Thanks for the photo. Good looking peppers. I have some HBJ and 6-4's sprouted as well. The Jalmundo looks like it ought to be good.

Thanks again for the photo and follow-up.


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RE: NuMex Joe E. Parker

The Joe Parker is a good chile for roasting, and is also good fresh both red or green. My nephew eats them right off the plant, especially when red. As Chilehead stated, it is very mild, although with some discernable heat (unlike a bell pepper) and a flavor that no bell pepper can come close to. I grow Heritage Big Jim now because they are bigger, and have just a touch more heat (about 1/4 - 1/2 that of a jalapeno). CPI also has a heritage Joe E Parker. The heritage strains have been "re-improved", that is, they have been rebred to try to regain some of their distinctiveness lost over the decades since they were introduced. Sort of like when a great classic album is remastered. Also, if you search "Hatch Chile" on google, you will find a myriad of links to websites with a wealth of knowledge on growing and cooking NuMex chiles. Good luck!


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I'll definately check it out

Hey Thanks. I do like 'some heat'. I have ordered some hot chiles; orange hab, Datil, tabasco, Aji Limon and Takanotsume, but these will be the hottest I've every dealt with.

I've got about 40 plants sprouted and under lights right now, with half-again that many coming in time. But, other than serrano, the remaining ones are Jalapeno heat level and down.

I am really looking forward to my garden this year. The peppers are adding an exciting edge to my anticipation. I want to make my own hot sauce, hot pickles, and a bunch of other things.

I appreciate this site. I am learning a lot.


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