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Wilt Water method

Posted by habjolokia 7 (zellmarkj@yahoo.com) on
Fri, Jun 29, 12 at 19:43

I've seen wilt watering methods talked about so I decided its time to have a visual. here is two Trinidad Scorpions, as you will see both have the same soil, exposed to the same heat (today 100+)slightly different pot size but not too big of a difference. One says water me, and the other said I can wait until later. I think the key to not over or under watering is not to have a set schedule but watch the plants. IMHO.

My Red Hab has been a little more wilted then this TS is but still bounced back. This is about as far as you would want them to get though before hitting em with water.

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Follow up pic after watering about 15-25 min later

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Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Wilt Water method

Perfect representation for those of you wondering how often to water your peppers...this is the way!


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RE: Wilt Water method

Good pics.

They will handle wilting even worse than that. Believe me, I know (lazy %^& that I am). It actually takes a lot to kill a pepper, I've found. But best not to push it.


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RE: Wilt Water method

thank you for that demonstration. That was amazing. I might push the limits too. I think infrequent deep watering might make them a tougher plant and more productive


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RE: Wilt Water method

Hab,
This will go against what many folks here say but....

The whole idea that peppers need to dry out between waterings comes from folks who use slow soil, which require ample time to regain oxygen levels post saturation and will almost certainly support a high PWT. For these folks that policy is necessary and perfectly adequate. For those of use who use a fast soil, this is not the case. If your plants wilt in a 5-1-1...meaning wilt from being dry, not wilt from being hot....then your mix is WAY TOO DRY. There is absolutley nothing wrong with maintaining a constantly moist (please note: I'm not saying constantly WET) 5-1-1....it will not cause the same detrimental root problems like a constantly moist slow soil - even when a 5-1-1 is moist, it's still well aerated - so the roots don't lose thier functionality.

I've said it before, I try to maintain my 5-1-1 at about the moisture level of a wrung out spounge. I never withhold water from any of my plants - for any reason - including peppers. It's just not necessary in a 5-1-1.

PJ


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RE: Wilt Water method

Sorry for the double post, but I forgot...incase you require proof:

These guys get watered EVERY DAY....they are also well mulched.

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Happy as clams...

PJ


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RE: Wilt Water method

Bravo DaMonkey!

I have turned to watering more frequently and my plants have enjoyed it. Not to overdo it, but they enjoy water - there's no doubt about it. I think underwatering is a mindset you can easily get locked into when the plants are YOUNG. When they get more mature, they love it!


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RE: Wilt Water method

I'm not sure anyone is recommending under-watering as the normal practice. But for those that don't really know how much to water, erring on the side of under-watering is less dangerous than over-watering. There is a natural indicator to guide you - leaf wilt. Easily reversible, unlike root rot.


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RE: Wilt Water method

Hi All, this post was just an example of the mentioned wilt watering method that is often given to those who post pics that we know the problem is overwatering and wanted to post a visual example. For my plants personally, I know when the plants need to be watered and the ones pictured are not in the best soil mix and it's not fast draining so about 3-4 days even on hot days, my Red Hab not pictured on hot days it takes daily or every other day watering because the mix is closer to the 5-1-1.

Once they understand their plants/soil/mix then they will know how not to overwater. It's also a good example if someone growing for the first time and were to come home and see their plants in this condition feel bad and water them continuously so they don't end up that way again and end up overwatering.

I thank all for the feedback and the great information that's shared on GW.


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RE: Wilt Water method

Yup, this is for people that don't yet know how to water correctly. Its not being considered as the correct way, just a better way than overwatering for those that don't have a feel for it yet.


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Don't get me wrong, I was not impling that anyone was advocating underwatering, hence the statement "For these folks that policy is necessary and perfectly adequate." I was, however, impling that proper watering habits are a function of your medium. I.e. Slow soils ~require~ a period of drying to avoid root problems, while faster soils do not, and as I stated, if you are using fast soils that dry quickly and are prone too hydrophobia, it's downright ill advised to wait until the plant wilts to give it water.

PJ


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No problem at all, understood all points of view and enjoy all the information available made by the members of GW. 2013 season it's the 5-1-1 for me, dropping the MG orchid and MG organic mix. My choice by the information available on this forum. Thanks PJ as I read it's your mix.

Mark


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RE: Wilt Water method

According to this forum, stated many times, if you see yellowing of lower leaves this can indicate over-watering.

It's not always the case, but straight yellowing without the spots is usually from too much water.

Not a serious condition as I have seen yellowing leaves turn back to green in time. Others are too far gone and drop. I think this can be said for the blossoms as well. But I am finding that buds never recover once they have gone yellow and just drop.

I have yet to see a blossom recover from yellowing. Having said that, I cannot be completely sure because it's nearly impossible to track flower buds.

As we know, excessive flower (and bud) drops can be a symptom of over-watering. But then, under-watering has a similar effect.

For potting, I believe in bottom watering as the primary threshold for water. I don't ignore topside, but tend to just keep it moist. On occasion I'll do the main watering from the top, it just depends how it 'feels' to do so.


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RE: Wilt Water method

Agree with DaMonkey totally. That is the beauty of 5:1:1 is that it is very forgiving of watering differences. You can water it a lot, or wait, whatever you prefer, and there is a large leeway. I've noticed that 5:1:1 tends to dry out gradually, so it's easily determined when it is getting near too dry. Peat based soils on the other hand seem to be all or nothing. They are too wet for a long time, and then BANG, they are too dry and hydrophobic. This makes water timing in peat very difficult since there is such a narrow window. Not too mention rain can saturate plants in peat as well quite easily, although this doesn't happen in 5:1:1. 5:1: tends to stay in a range of good moisture for a long time, and you have lots of indication that watering time is near.


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