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Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

Posted by sandhill_farms 10 NV (My Page) on
Sat, Jun 5, 10 at 23:59

Greetings,

I have just returned to the forums after a several year hiatus frrom growing vegetables. Now I'm going to be spending a lot of free time in the gardens and am looking forward to it. I also have a passion for outdoor Photography so I can incorporate both these interests.

I live in a great area to grow hot chilis, (desert outside of Las Vegas), but haven't started any yet so I'll wait until next year. I'm interested in some of the different varities that people are growing and have a question or two about the Bhut Jolokia and Chiltepin Peppers. After reading about them it looks like the Bhut is a very hot pepper but then I've read the same thing about the Tepin as well. What can someone tell me about these peppers and how (or if) they compare to each other. How about the chocolates or other chilis in the same league?

Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

Greg
Nevada


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

The Ghost pepper which is rated as the Hottest pepper in the world at about one million Scotvils while the Chiltepin is only about 50,000 at best The Ghost pepper is a Habanero and the Chiltipin is a C. annuum var aviculare it is very hot, but the fire doesn't last very long, while the fire from the Ghost pepper last for quite awhile and will really hurt you if you are not use to eating really killer hot peppers. In fact the ghost pepper was developed to be used as a replacement in making military strengh pepper spray in India.
Redwood city Seeds say that the chiltepin is the words hotest pepper, but that is all hype to get you to buy The seeds. The fact is there are several habaneros that are hotter than the chiltepin, but if you just want a really nice hot pepper that you can taste the flavor of it and live through the burn then get a chiltepin, I use to grow quite a few of then, but failed to make sure I still had seeds of it, so now Im looking for some myself.
You could also try growing some of the other wild hot peppers, like C. eximium, C.cardenasii, C.chacoense, and C. praetermissum, some of them are very hot and they overwinter quite well inside in you have a nice sunny spot to put them in. C. praetermissum can grow to 7ft tall and be loaded with hundreds of 1/4"X !/4" hot peppers that can make your mouth hurt. I really like this pepper. Sadly Its one that I'm now trying to find also.
George W. Z5-6 MO


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

George W. thanks for your response.

Greg
Nevada


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

Bhut Jolokia is a C.Chinense not a Habanero.
Both are C.Chinense.
As far as heat goes I'd say some 7 pots are the hottest then Bhut Jolokia and the Nagas easily.

Tepins aren't even in the Super Hot Ballpark.

Some Chacoense and Praetermissums are sold by seed venders on the net.

Beth is great at Peppermania.

http://www.bayoutraders.com/other_species.html

Vladin is cool too.

http://www.rainbowchiliseeds.com/catalog/c11_p1.html

Both toss in extra seeds with your order.

Texas wild bird

http://www.tradewindsfruitstore.com/servlet/the-Hot-Peppers/Categories

If you look around some wild stuff is around.

I'm growing several wilds this season and might be able to trade seeds later this fall/end of harvest.
If things go well for my plants.

C.Eximum , Charipita , several different Chacoense,Praetermissum,Ulupica , Galopagoense , cardenasii , lanceolatum , rhomboideum , microcarpum and several wild Bird Peppers,Tepins,Pequins.

Also working on several varieties and strains of Bhut/Bih Jolokia , Nagas , Trinidad Scorpions and 7Pots.

Hopefully I'll have a Super Hot summers end.


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

I agree with George's general post. I find the tepin to be sharp and peppery but quick. The bhut is more fruity in the beginning then chemical and long lasting.

Both are hot, but I would say the bhut is way more painful.

They are in different species so hard to compare otherwise.

However, in Vegas you should be able to grow year round. No reason to wait until next year, as long as you can provide water and shade during the hottest parts of your year, you can have plants year round. Remember peppers are perennial and can survive for years in the right climate.

kendra


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

Based on experienced growing in phoenix desert you may find you will get much easier success getting chiltepine to produce thru the summers. The bhut seems more sensitive to correct night/day temps which get to hot during the summer here - so there is a very short fruiting season in spring and fall.

The hottest salsa's I've made are with chiltepine, not because the pepper is hotter than a bhut, but because I put more in. (2 cups chiltepin to 4 cups tomato/onion vs. 1/2 cup bhut to same)


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

chiltepin has a quick hot burn, that goes away really fast so its perfect for salsas and basically anything - as the burn isnt life threatening!

if you are searching for some chiltepin, let me know, I could send a pod out to you for an SASBE - (pod should have 10-14 peppers or so).

email me if interested.
Danny

smokemaster - i'll have to hit you up for a trade later in the fall as I'm very interested in ulupica, rhombodium, and other wild peppers -
i'm growing galapagoense and chacoense this year as my other wilds haven't yet germinated (crossing fingers as its been 2 months since i put the seed in pots).

i would love to see a lanceolatum germinate and grow to adulthood!
Danny


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

Seeing GeorgeW post here made me jump in. :) Nice to see you back here posting. George was one of the generous members on GW who introduced me to wild peppers when I was a rookie to this hobby. If I only knew what he had gotten me into. lol.

I saw your message to me. I'll respond shortly. I'm going something I haven't done before this year. I said screw some pots and am growing some wilds direct in raised beds. I'm going for bigger plants for once!! I've always babied them, but I'm risking it this season.

Chris


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

I really enjoy the thrill of growing wilds.
This is my first year growing wilds - other than the chiltepin. So far I have mine in pots and I'm going to try to overwinter them. Right now my main priority is to grow them and not necessarily to get them to fruit!

I may even put some more to germinate even if it is a little late in the season. I think the challenge is what I truly love. It's also fun to talk to others that are into wilds about their successes and failures!

Danny


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

The Chiltepin holds nothing to the Bhut Jolokia except for taste. The Bhut is way too hot to even have much taste. I just put a piece in my mouth about the size of the head of a pin and I am now looking for ice.

The only drawback is that they are small and full of seeds. So if you are into saving seeds you have a glodmine, just save the shell for cooking or salsa...

Here is a link that might be useful: Bhut Jolokia Seeds


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

You might live in a great area for chilis, but not Bhuts. Bhut prefer humid climates.


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

In Mexico, the tepin flavor is described as "'arrebatado', an expression that means 'although it is extremely hot the sensation dissappears easily and rapidly."'

I have never grown bhuts so have no input on them. I tasted one but it was waaaayyyyy to picante to use in what I cook. Not looking for pain, looking for taste.


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RE: Bhut Jolokia vs. Chiltepin - Questions

Pick the Chiltepin if you're interested in Mexican cuisine. Choose the Bhut Jolokia if you're into Indian fare.

Simple as that!


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