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Guam Boonies?

Posted by JonnieSilvs 5b (My Page) on
Sat, Sep 14, 13 at 16:35

I'm interested in trying to grow some guam boonie peppers, but I can't locate a seed source. Can anyone help me out? I have mariwiri seeds to trade, and I can attest to their deliciousness.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Guam Boonies?

What are mariwari?
Wiri Wiri?

Guam Boonies is also called Donie Sali.
I have them under both names for trade.Probably dried pods and seeds...


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Yeah it's wiri wiri, but my understanding is that there are a couple of different forms going around.

I heard some people saying the boonies is the same as donne sali, and others saying its different.

Similarly, I've heard these wiri wiri are different than the regular kind, but having not grown another form, I can detect no morphological difference myself from pictures posted online. All I know is that they are delicious little guyanese fireballs :P

Here's a picture of my plant! I wish I had started her sooner. She's just now pumping out red pods.

If you want to do a trade, I'd be happy to send some seed. I also have red rocoto and fatalii. I cannot attest to the productivity of the rocoto though, as I haven't grown them yet.


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Jonnie - great looking wiri wiri. I have a friend who's from India who gave me Guyana wiri wiri seeds. Mine took forever to grow to a size I was comfortable putting outside. They are still the slowest growing pepper plant I've ever grown and I don't get pods to mid Sept which I'm finally getting. Your plant is way more robust than mine. My friend makes wiri wiri hot sauce and it's about the best homemade I've tasted. His wife travels home several times a year and she brings back a bunch and then they spend a day making sauce.....

I've tried germinating/growing Guam Boonies twice and have yet to get a seed to sprout, so can not speak to them.


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Hi sandy. They do take a while, but they're definitely worth the wait. I'm overwintering this one to try and get a head start next season.

If I do get my hands on any solid boonie seeds, I'll definitely dry out some pods and spread the love next year.


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RE: Guam Boonies?

If you guys still need some. I have some I harvested in
2011. These peppers are about an inch long and I
originally received seeds from someone on Daves garden.
There is still some confusion to which is the real boonie
pepper.
I have a customer from Guam. His sister finally sent him
some seeds for the boonie. I'm going to try and get a
few seeds from him and compare to the one's I have
next year.

This post was edited by roper2008 on Mon, Sep 16, 13 at 12:11


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Roper, I'd be delighted to grow your boonie pepper. Would you like to try the mariwiri?


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Sure. Email me.


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Jonnie,
I would love to trade for the wiri wiri, fatali and rocota but only have some chimayo and dried boonies right now. Whaddya think?

Jo


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RE: Guam Boonies?

I am also interested in getting some wiri wiri seeds. I also have Donni Sali seeds from the Marshall Islands. Please email me.

John


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RE: Guam Boonies?

I'm in Guam now...Boonie is Donne Sali BUT many believe the jungle plant is better than commercially grown... both are way hot for me, trying to have 1000 seeds soon.


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Careful trying to bring them into the US.> Plants and Plant Products Permits.

Permits are required for the importation into the U.S. and transit through the U.S. of regulated plants and plant products for consumption or propagation. Plant and plant product permits include plants for planting such as nursery stock, small lots of seed, and postentry; plant products such as fruits and vegetable, timber, cotton and cut flowers; protected plants and plant products such as orchids, and threatened and endangered plant species; transit permits to ship regulated articles into, through, and out of the U.S.; and departmental permits to import prohibited plant materials for research.

ENTRY STATUS OF SEEDS FOR PLANTING - SUMMARY

Shipments of imported seed from all origins other than Canada require a phytosanitary certificate from the country of origin, except as noted in the section below for small lots of seed.

Small lots of seed: Lots of seed may be imported without a phytosanitary certificate under the following conditions:

(1) The importation of the seed is authorized by a written permit.

(ii) There are a maximum of 50 seeds of 1 taxon (taxonomic category such as genus, species, cultivar, etc.) per packet; or a maximum weight not to exceed 10 grams of seed of 1 taxon;

This post is to inform you of the rules you are breaking and in no way intended to advise you to hide the item or not declare them avoiding confiscation.

This post was edited by northeast_chileman on Fri, Aug 29, 14 at 8:51


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RE: Guam Boonies?

> "Permits are required for ... regulated plants ..."

The form acts as though all plants are regulated, but the plain text of the statute restricts permitting to regulated plants only. I bet a buck that if you dig up the list of regulated plants, peppers are not on it.

Dennis


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RE: Guam Boonies?

I brought in two bottles of Thai peppers bought from a street vender to San Francisco in my bag. Customs looked at it shook it to make sure nothing hiding inside and put it back. Don't know what they are but sure are tasty and have a good kick and grow like crazy.


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RE: Guam Boonies?

You are correct Dennis, there are very few plants/seeds regulated by this rule, mostly invasive weeds with a few being Solanaceae, Regulated Plant Pest List. The rule is there to prevent the import of the baddies that can hide in the germplasm, as noted in that list and being imported in bulk, that's the reason for the small quantities exemption.

The issues are the importation of small quantities, the quantities noted in previous post, the declaration form, the enforcement by CBP and the penalties, Prohibited and Restricted Items.
Plants and Seeds

Some plants, cuttings, seeds that are capable of propagation, unprocessed plant products and certain endangered species are allowed into the United States but require import permits and other documents; some are prohibited entirely. Threatened or endangered species that are permitted must have export permits from the country of origin.

Every single plant or plant product including handicraft items made with straw, must be declared to the CBP officer and must be presented for CBP inspection, no matter how free of pests it appears to be. For information on importing plants or plant products visit the Plant, Organism and Soil Permits page.

At the page noted above it states in part:

Plants and Plant Products Permits
Plant and Plant Product Permits include Plants for Planting such as nursery stock, small lots of seed, and Postentry; Plant Products such as fruits and vegetable, timber, cotton and cut flowers;

Clicking on above link brings us to Plants for planting - including nursery stock, roots, bulbs, seeds and other plant parts

At the bottom of that page is What plant material requires a permit?

Which finally brings us to:

What Plant Material Requires a Permit?

Small lots of seed imported without a phytosanitary certificate;

I'm not trying to scare anyone or coerce them on circumventing the rules, I'm just trying to advise so an informative decision can be made by readers on what they are faced with.

NECM


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RE: Guam Boonies?

Well I guess everything must be declared. But unless they see evidence of infestation they have no basis on which to block them. I got no problem with declaration, just heavy handed bureaucracy.

Thanks for the detail. Good stuff to know.

Dennis


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RE: Guam Boonies?

That customs declaration form asks if you have visited a farm/ranch/pasture. What happens is you answer yes? Can they deny re-admittance to the US?
This of off topic, but I have never before seen the customs declaration form on GW.


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RE: Guam Boonies?

I ordered some seeds from an Amazon seller earlier this year. It was only after placing the order I found out the seller was in Singapore. I then took a closer look at his feedback and discovered some of his US customers didn't receive their seeds and got a rejection letter from the US Dept. of Agriculture instead.

I never did get my seeds (only ordered 20), but didn't get the rejection letter either. Roll of the dice, win or lose. At least it was only a $3 bet. :-)


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