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Veggies/Perennials

Posted by Lady.love 5 (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 24, 12 at 14:05

PLEASE tell me that you are trying to extend your growing season and adding more edible perennials to your garden! I feel so alone!!!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Veggies/Perennials

I'm new to this forum. Surprised that no one answered your question. I'm always trying to start earlier and find ways to extend my growing season and add more edibles anywhere I can. I haven't got a hugel set up yet, but it's about half way there. I can hardly wait! My friend had one this year and grew some incredible looking plants and some that never should have grown in our summer heat.


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

I have several hugel beds in place from last year. Have noticed a difference in how much is growing in them. Planning on building several keyholes underneath some crape myrtles to block some of the hot sun we get in the summers.


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

There wasn't a question posed, so not sure what info you're looking for. But you are definitely not alone! I do this, too, and see no reason to have a separate area for the growing of edibles except the really ugly/unruly vines, which do have a separate, less visible area. But I do plant non-edibles around the edge of it just because it pleases my eye. You may want to also visit to the potager and/or edible landscape forums.

Do you have a compost pile?


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

I do have a compost pile. There really wasn't a question, this is more of a frustration post. Lol. I love growing things and I wasn't feeling really in touch with other fellow gardeners.


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

I discovered a local permaculture group thru meetup dot com. The attendees vary from hopefuls to very experienced. It was a treat to visit a homestead where they've been following permaculture principles for years. I'm still a beginner. We don't have animals but can get local manure for the garden. I wouldn't have understood keyholes if I hadn't watched a video someone linked to yesterday. This has been our first winter with a high tunnel.

I've done a lousy job with edible perennials (i.e. asparagus, rhubarb and blueberries) so this year I need to do some fixing (which I said last year). Now I discover a whole lot of trees and shrubs I knew nothing about. Lots to learn.


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

I'm guilty of the same thing, defrost. Every spring I'm way too busy futzing with house plants, annual flowers, and the edibles are almost an afterthought. It's just so much easier to do the known than delve into the unknown. I've never been very good at edibles but if I don't put more effort into it, how will I improve? I don't want to live out in the country, but I think I would have less "landscaping" on my mind if I did, more "workscaping."


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

Every year I have such great plans, ideas and hopes, mostly dreamed up throughout the winter. Come spring I'm busy planting and doing then the hot weather strikes and both I and my little plants wilt. It is hard to keep on top of it all when you are at work all day. Perennial vegetable are a great way to keep that garden spirit alive. A few years ago Good King Henry, French sorrel, herbs, comfrey, chives, loveage were added to the yard and are always ready to be harvested and enjoyed with little input once they establish. There is wild asparagus growing in the neighbourhood. Several rhubarb plants mixed in the flower beds are always ready to supply a springtime treat and those leaves are always spectacular. If only there were more temperate climate perenniel edibles. Dear Southpoint: What did you plant in your hugel beds the first year? This year I am going to covert one raised bed to a hugel bed and am wondering what edible to plant or to just cover crop with something the first year.


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

I live where we have hot, dry summers. I am trying Chaya, Chipilin, Vietnamese Sweet Bush, Gynura, Rampion, Italian Red Stem Dandelion, perennial kale, tree collards, one of my South American chili peppers is perennial, it looks like chard, lacinato kale and another leafy brassica is too. I have walking Egyptian onions, scallions, artichoke, asparagus, orach, sorrel. I'm growing moringa and pigeon peas from seed. I grow chives, scorzonera, grape vines (for leaves), yacon, sweet potatoes, chayote, runner and lima beans (perennial here). I also have two mesquite trees.


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RE: Veggies/Perennials

There are tons of perennial veggies for temperate climates. Check out the Paradise Lot website and below is a link to a short youtube that one of the guys put out.

Chicory is a great perennial for temperate zones... gives you bitter greens in the summer, pretty cornflower blue flowers for your vase and then if you are a little industrious you can dig the roots in October and stick them in sand in a dark bucket and they'll turn into endive (which isn't cheap at the store).

Here is a link that might be useful: cold climate perennial vegetables


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