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Giant grub

Posted by IAmSupernova SE Texas 9A (My Page) on
Sat, Apr 6, 13 at 17:08

Any ideas what it might be? Found 2 in my compost while screening it. They're both at least twice as big as any grub I've ever seen... The birds that found them must be happy.

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Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Giant grub

Looks like palmetto bug.


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RE: Giant grub

Not a palmetto bug (roach). Perhaps some type of rhinoceros beetle, definitely a Scarabiadae Family member.


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RE: Giant grub

Those are the larva of one of the Scarab Beetles.

Here is a link that might be useful: Scarab Beetles


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RE: Giant grub

Yep, one of the big beetles.

Purple, am curious about what you're thinking about. I'm sure that you've become familiar with palmetto bugs (American cockroach) by now so I'm thinking that you're thinking of some other creature.


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RE: Giant grub

FWIW I once answered "Palmetto Bug" instead of "Palmetto Weevil" and provided a moment of mirth for the rest of class.


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RE: Giant grub

Hmm... These things are in my compost too, thought they were larval stage of the ubiquitous palmetto, which love the compost pile as adults. It's always full of them. Also saw a couple of them sweeping oak leaves at my Mom's a few days ago. I defer to the expertise of those who know more, thanks for the correction!


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RE: Giant grub

Cockroaches hatch from their egg cases as miniature versions of the adults, minus the wings. The correct term for this stage of development is a nymph. They may be as small as the head of a pin at that earliest stage. As they grow, they will periodically shed their exoskeleton; they will do this several times until they reach adulthood. They will emerge from that last molt with their wings and all of the necessary 'pieces and parts' for mating.

Many insects undergo this form of metamorphosis; you're familiar with plenty of them. Have you ever seen a freshly hatched grasshopper? Or praying mantis? Sometimes we miss seeing the early instar nymphs of insects because they are so small.

Beetles undergo a different type of metamorphosis, also shared with plenty of different insects. The young of beetles, flies, bees, wasps, etc., are called larvae. Those beetles belonging to the Scarabaedae family evolve from those larvae we term white grubs. Different beetles have their own characteristics as larvae. Think of the ladybug larvae, for example.

Attached is the best image I could find of the Palmetto Bug, Water bug, American Cockroach from oothaeca to adult. Ick!

Here is a link that might be useful: American Cockroach


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RE: Giant grub

A Cotinis larva. Specializes in composting. Won't damage live plants in your garden.

The adult is the green fruit beetle, aka fig beetle.


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RE: Giant grub

Cotinis larva. One of the scarab beetle family members.


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RE: Giant grub

Thanks for the info, Rhizo, Jean, Kim.


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