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wrong weed killer?

Posted by jrose25 none (My Page) on
Wed, Jun 11, 14 at 8:01

Its my fianc� and I first garden and my fianc� had bought some preen for the weeds growing but didnt get the right preen. Got the preen for the lawn and not the garden...and this morning the plants are starting to droop. Is the garden going to die? Is there anything we can do to fix this?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: wrong weed killer?

Sigh.

If you want advice, you'll need to be very specific about which Preen product you mistakenly used. We need the entire brand name, formulation, and active ingredients. Preen makes several herbicides for lawns.


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RE: wrong weed killer?

preen is a PRE emergent ...

why was it used ON PLANTS????

ken


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RE: wrong weed killer?

  • Posted by morz8 Z8 Wa coast (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 11, 14 at 10:37

jrose, I'm sorry but it doesn't look good for your plants.

From the Preen lawn weed product label: " May adversely affect non target plants. Do not use product on or in close proximity to desirable plants. Do not use product on flowers, vegetables, ground covers, gardens or plantings including shrubs and trees.

It's a hard way to learn - Always read the label and instructions before application.


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RE: wrong weed killer?

Ken....some pre emergents (including some of the Preen formulations) are intended to be used in planted beds to prevent the germination of weed seeds. In other words, safe to use over the top of established broad leaf ornamental annuals, perennials, trees, and shrubs.

Jrose, the label is a critically important document and one that so many people ignore. Pesticides of any kind are not intended to be used without reading the label.

We need to carefully read AND UNDERSTAND the label of any product for the first time at the store to make sure that we are purchasing the right product for the job.

The second time we need to read the label is before mixing and/or application of the product. Find out the dangers, precautions, specific directions for using, etc.

You should review the label again to remind yourself how to rinse your sprayer and how to store the product.

This accident occurred because you didn't read and understand the label.

Redundantly, I'll suggest that you read the label to find the 1-800 number in order that you can call and find out how soon you can plant a new garden.

Chemical companies want their customers to use their products safely. I'd be very surprised if you didn't get some good advice when you call.

Also, next time you decide to use a lawn or garden chemical, call the 1-800 number before you even buy it! Ask questions first if the label seems too complicated. That's what I would do.


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