Return to the Garden Clinic Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Tiny Grub ID

Posted by jalilu Sunset Zone 23/24 (My Page) on
Tue, Sep 17, 13 at 8:56

Hi

I would to know whether or not this minuscule white grub with black head could be responsible for this young mango tree leaf sprouts dying after their color turn brown. Any idea about its ID?

 photo Bug_zps27d0d707.jpg


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Tiny Grub ID

Jalilu, is there any way of getting a more detailed image of this critter? It's difficult to make a good ID from your picture.

And you can find appropriate products, based on an ID, at a whole lot better price than the link posted above.


 o
RE: Tiny Grub ID

  • Posted by jalilu Sunset Zone 23/24 (My Page) on
    Wed, Sep 18, 13 at 7:54

Thanks both for your answers. Can't take a more detailed image of that critter because I removed it right after taking the picture, then sprayed that part with a homemade solution made of natural black soap (paste) with a little bit of vegetable oil and methanol. I use this for mealybugs and aphids, and it works. I don't like chemical insecticides, especially the organochlorine ones.

I will check if is there any improvement when I'll be back home for the weekend.

Jalilu


 o
RE: Tiny Grub ID

jalilu, look through these
images and look for the insect with a white body and black head.
Maybe Pseudalacaspis cockerelli.


 o
RE: Tiny Grub ID

I keep coming back to this...mostly because I just cannot make heads nor tails of the image. My first reaction is to follow jalilu 's lead with the word 'grub'. I don't believe that this insect is a true grub, but could certainly be the larva of a fly (maggot), in particular that of a fruit fly.

I flashed back to my high school biology classes when I looked at that tiny white 'thing ' with the miniscule black head. Fruit fly life cycle observation imprinted the appearance of their larvae in my brain forever.

I've also wondered about leaf miner larvae, some of which are the maggots of tiny fly species.


 o
RE: Tiny Grub ID

jalilu, I am also puzzled, because I am not familiar with many insect pests on the mango.
However, there is a scale insect, Aspidiotus destructor
which, if present, would migrate to the tender growth of its host. The pest is more common on coconut palms.
You can find an image HERE.


 o
RE: Tiny Grub ID

  • Posted by jalilu Sunset Zone 23/24 (My Page) on
    Tue, Sep 24, 13 at 5:36

Thanks all for your concern. In fact what looked like a larva was sap. That black dot is dried sap that exuded first. i saw more on other mango trees.

However, I found white spiders this time. :(

 photo IMG_8251_1_zps7456d3be.jpg


 o
RE: Tiny Grub ID

jalilu, Mother Nature making a fool of me... again!


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Garden Clinic Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here