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transplanting lupines

Posted by susan426 3 (My Page) on
Mon, Jun 24, 02 at 11:44

I have transplanted some wild lupines and they don't look great, are rather droopy - it's only been a few days but i am wondering if they need water or are overwatered, or if they just don't take well to transplanitng. Is there anything I should do differently next time? they grow everywhere where I am (Maine) and I would love more in my yard. i dug them out of some sandy soil and when I pulled them up the soil came off so I only had roots to transplant.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: transplanting lupines

lupine grow from seed so easily that i dont transplant them.
also they do need bacteria and u may not have it in your soil and it might take them a while to find it. also they are very iffy to begin with when transplanting, being soft stemmed.
collect the seed and plant it fresh and u will have more than u know what to do with in a short time.
froggy


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RE: transplanting lupines

I transplanted a large plant from my front yard to my back yard a few weeks ago, and it looked very sad for awhile. It seems to be coming out of it, though. I'm keeping it watered. Most of the perennials I've been moving around my yard go through a period of transplant shock, but most of them do come out of it and survive : )


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RE: transplanting lupines

How has your Lupine responded? After a couple of weeks of waiting, do you think they're going to make it?

I'd like to do the same.


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RE: transplanting lupines

The grow very easily from seed. You can transplant very small seedlings, but you are best leaving mature plants alone.


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RE: transplanting lupines

  • Posted by mina Z5 Chicago (My Page) on
    Thu, May 29, 03 at 10:29

I have also heard that lupines do not transplant well. I put some seed down in early May and I already have baby lupines coming up.

Laura


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RE: transplanting lupines

Does a lupine plant bloom each year? Someone told me that they don't


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RE: transplanting lupines

Many lupines are annuals. I think what people call wild lupine is Lupinus perennis. It is a blue flowered perennial of sandy soils.


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RE: transplanting lupines

  • Posted by johnp z4 mn/wi (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 3, 03 at 22:27

My lupinus perennis are short-lived - 2-4 years - but there are always a couple new plants - self seeded in odd places - to replace the ones that die. I've got a stunning one blooming right now in rocks alongside my garage.


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RE: transplanting lupines

Hi All, I am not sure if I should be posting to a question this old, but...
I have had very good success with very small seedling plants. The seed pods self sow in my yard so I just go around dig them up when they are about 2-3 inches high and plant where ever I want.
If it is very immature plant I have great luck, however, if the plant is from a previous year and a small size the root system is larger and goes into shock.


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RE: transplanting lupines

I have more lupines than I know what to do with at my house. They multiply like rabbits it seems. I think they come back every year. Anyways, I have the heaviest clay soil known to man, so they do not just like sandy soils!


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RE: transplanting lupines

Yeah, I tried to transplant my lups this year with zero success. They were all started from seeds about 4 yrs ago, bloomed the second year, and have put on a wonderful show ever since. In fact, they are taking over a strip of bedding around my patio that is about 7' wide by 13' long.
S'Ok with me! I love lupines!
Anyway, I will scatter seeds this year in the area I want more lups. Here's hoping that I'll see fully blooming ones in two years.


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RE: transplanting lupines

Here in Michigan, the native, wild lupines are normally found in sandy areas. My sister tried to grow seedlings that I started for her (Wintersown) and they didn't do well in her rich, moist soil. Mine have done well and reseeded in my sandy soil. I just transplanted several year-old plants from my previous garden to my new yard. Only one looked pretty droopy, but it seems to have perked up and I'm hoping they'll still bloom this year. I'm starting a "purple" themed garden and I'm hoping lupines will provide some appropriate early season color.

Good Luck!

Martha


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