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I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Posted by love2weed Zn6 (My Page) on
Wed, May 4, 05 at 20:23

Are there any perennials that you can just put in water and get roots?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Ahh lazy. Finally somebody I can relate to.

Last year I was given some Euonymus clippings about 4 or 5 inches long and I put them in a big glass of some regular old tap
water. I had these little fibrous white roots develop in about 2 weeks. I was thrilled. Then I put them in a little garden up against my garage. they survived the winter and are really starting to grow up the garage wall.Lots of new growth. It was really easy- which is good right? :>)


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Rosemary. Roots right on your windowsill.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

geranium, impatiens, willow, coleus


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Mint. Easy as can be. In fact most mint relatives will root readily in water.

~Chills


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Basil! You just pinch the plant back, plunk the stems in water, use some of the leaves as you need them in the kitchen and the remainder of the plant will put out roots then you plant that back in the ground and start all over again. I love having basil on the kitchen counter, really handy.
Pauline


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Mock orange.

But really, it doesn't take that much energy to get some rooting hormone and mix a bit of soil for rooting, and you can do so many more plants.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Wait a minute - every time I try rooting in water, the plant just rots instead of rooting. What am I doing wrong?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

African Violets, Purple Passion vine, tomato suckers...in fact most of those don't-know-the-names vines that everyone likes to grow inside. LOL I wonder if city water might be the reason some have trouble with rooting in water. I used to take a nice long piece of vine and coil it up..tie it with twistems and plunk the whole thing down in a shallow dish of water to make roots all along the coiled stem. When it is planted, you have a nice pot full of leaves and then multiple stems will come up and make a really pretty plant that is full and not skimpy looking.

Some folks will tell you that they can't make the transition from water to soil, but they can if kept nice and moist and shaded for awhile until the roots shift gears from water to soil.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Oleanders produce roots easily in water


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Surfbreeze: Where do you take the cliping from on the Oleander? My plant doesn't seem to have any noticable nodes on where to make a cut.

Tim


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I have read that hydrangea roots well in water. I have not tried them yet.

You can make homemade rooting hormone. Cut a bunch of fresh willow twigs and pour very hot water over them to make a tea. Steep for a few hours. Use the tea to water your cutting for the first time or use it to root in water.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

forsyenthia,snowball bush and gardenias.am trying lots more stuff..i agree to transfer from water to pots i just plant then in the shade and keep well watered for a week or so.i am now trying hydrandgea and weigela


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I tried the forsythia, but I don't know if I did it right or not. Still waiting, as it's now planted, but when I had them in water, they didn't seem to do much at all, no visible roots at all. Very sad... I love yellow so much, I even like dandelions (until they go to seed, then they look horrible even to me.) LOL


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by janw az9b (My Page) on
    Fri, May 27, 05 at 20:42

seabreeze I also have been trying to root oleander I`m trying with oasis at this time for about three weeks with no results so far what is the secret??


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Cuttings of Toothache Plant (Spilanthes oleracea) root just fine in a glass of water. Tiny bumps form along the stem below the water. Wait until they elongate into roots.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

.....also ficus roots very easily. Cut 3" / 4" shoots from your tree, place in water and in 2/3 weeks you'll see roots! Anne


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Be careful with the mint. Don't plant in the ground, it will take over your yard.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

My friend just gave me a stem of her bay leaf plant and I first put it in water for a couple of days and then planted it in soil. Looks like it is growing nicely.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

persicara red dragon roots really well in water. and so does beacon silver lamium, oregano, sweet potato vines, ornamental and edible. Pineapple tops. night blooming cereus cactus, christmas cactus. sometimes hardy mums.You can grow philodendron and golden pothos indefinitely in water, so far mine has been in there for 3 years.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I would think if a person had a water softener the plants might not like that salty environment. Yes? No?
Tina


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I have even rooted flowering quince from cuttings in water.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

has any body tried petunias. mine are getting lanling so i pruned them and stuck them in water. i sure hope it happens.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I find that plants with a jointed stock will root in water. shruds, crepe myrtles, jasmine, gardenias,
Etc,
Good luck


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Yes, petunias will root in water; so will snapdragons, so will almost all salvias. African violets of course, but you can also root most of the other smallish gesneriads in water. I've never tried the big streptocarpus or gloxinia, so can't speak to those, but Streptocarpella (the former Streptocarpus saxorum) roots easily in water.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Children. If you give them buckets of water to play with, they stay rooted to the same spot (well, at least for a while)so you can do some gardening. (It's better to root them outside, less mess.)
Zophra


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by OCGF Z8 UT (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 2, 05 at 2:28

Sedums. They root in a week or two, but they will rot if you let them longer than that.

Omar


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 3, 05 at 16:17

Though roots form readily and often seemingly more quickly on many plants propagated in water, the roots produced are quite different from those produced in a soil-like or highly aerated medium (perlite - vermiculite - seed starting mix, e.g.). Physiologically, you will find these roots to be much more brittle than normal roots due to a much higher % of aerenchyma (a tissue with a greater percentage of intercellular air spaces than normal parenchyma). If you want to eventually plant your rooted cuttings in soil, it is probably not best to root them in water because of the frequent difficulty in transplanting them to soil. The "water roots" often break during transplant & those that don't break are very poor at water absorption and often die. The effect is equivalent to starting the cutting process over again.
If you do a side by side comparison of cuttings rooted in water & cuttings rooted in soil, the cuttings in soil will always (for an extremely high % of plants) have a leg up in development on those moved from water to a soil medium for the reasons outlined above.

Al


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

With the amount of replies posted could it be that most of us would agree that technology is the sale pitch when there really is a traditional method used by many, and infact, nature?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Before my mom passed, her and I have been rooting plants in water, and then planting them in dirt for years and years, and habe never lost a single one. I have pots upon pots of gorgeous lusious plants that started out little clippings rooting in water. If it's not broke, don't fix it! Rooting in water, and then planting in soil WORKS!!!

Lazy - and rooting in plain old water,
Tina


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

pothos (devils ivy) roots well in water. It's a very easy plant to grow, and I like it because it grows so fast you can just keep taking cuttings. But watch out; if you don't take cuttings or prune it it may take over your house! ;-)


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Wow...How often do you need to change the water? Most (or at least many) of my attempts have just rotted and gotten smelly b4 ever showing any signs of roots.

I did recently have success with a sedum and a tomato sucker.

Sue


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

This might sound like an silly question. You root only green wood or new growth, right? I can't imagine a hardwood cutting rooting.
Debbie


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Nobody answered TrowelGal's ? about if you have a watersoftner will your cuttings still root in the water? I'm curious also. We just recently got a softner and I haven't tried any yet.Before the water softner I had luck rooting easy stuff like sedum but my hydrangia cuttings rot every time. I took them from the soft wood.Any advice welcome.I'm desperate to start a piece from my grandmothers cottage.My aunt swears by the Beirs almanac. She says if you take cuttings or plant something under the fishy sign it will die or rot.Does anyone find any truth in that?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I'd like an answere to Sue's question. Also how long dues it take untell it should get roots. I have tried befor and always end up w/ nothing. Have gone about 4 or 6 weeks befor I give up and the plant starts looking like slug and gets stinky! Dues it help to add root hormone to the water? If so how much?
Sarah621


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I AM NEW TO PROPAGATING AND AFTER READING THE FORUMS FOR A FEW MONTHS I HAVE SUCCEEDED IN PROPAGATING SEVERAL PLANTS IN DIFFERENT WAYS. I HAVE ROOTED BOUGAINVILLEAS IN WATER (THAT WAS AN ACCIDENT). I HAD SOME LONG CLIPPINGS FROM HARDWOOD 60 CM LONG OR MORE IN WATER BECAUSE I HAD TOO MANY AND NO CONTAINERS TO PLANT THEM IN. USED TO CHANGE THE WATER EVERY WEEK MORE OR LESS.
GUESS WHAT! THEY ROOTED AFTER ABOUT 6 WEEKS. NOT LONG ROOTS, ONLY WHITE LITTLE BUMPS A FEW MM. LONG.THEY ALSO HAD LITTLE BABY LEAVES ON. AS I READ THAT BOUGAINVILLEA ROOTS ARE VERY FRAGILE I WAS VERY CAREFUL WHEN I PUT THEM IN A PLASTIC BOTTLE CUT IN HALF AND THEN PUT COMPOST AND COVERED THE BOTTOM PIECE WITH THE ROOTS ON. I THEN COVERED IT WITH THE TOP PART OF THE TRANSPARENT BOTTLE WITHOUT THE LID ON. THEY GROW MUCH FASTER THAN THE ONES I PUT DIRECTLY IN THE COMPOST, AND NO SIGN OF ROTTING. SOME OF THE ONES IN SOIL ROTTED. FROM NOW ON I AM GOING TO PUT THEM ALL IN WATER FIRST.
DON'T FORGET TO STRIP THE BOTTOM LEAVES OFF ALL THE PART OF THE STEM THAT IS GOING INTO THE WATER (THEY ROT). I DIDN'T USE ANY ROOTING HORMONE IN THE WATER, JUST PLAIN HARD TAP WATER. THE ONLY THING IS THEY DO TAKE A LONG TIME AND YOU HAVE TO BE PATIENT BUT IT IS WORTH THE WAIT. GOOD LUCK.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Ooh! Lemon grass! Buy some healthy-looking stems from your local supermarket, plonk them in water, and a few weeks later they'll have roots.

At least that much is true - whether I actually get mine to grow into a nice big plant is another matter.. :)

Melanie


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Hi there,

I didn't see this, but forgive me if I am asking a already answered question.

Can you water root a begonia cutting? I bought a little Dragon Wing Begonia plant at Walmart in the spring. It is gorgeous and huge!! I would like to get more plants from it.

Nan


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Sue and Sarah, as far as how often you change the water: I change it every 3-4 days and always rinse the roots under running water. We have really hard water-too much chlorine and such but still it works. what I really like to use is bottled water because you don't need to change it so often. Now this advice is only from personal experience from my cuttings getting stinky and rotting out.

Nana4jc - Begonias root wonderfully in water. someone gave me some clippings last year and adviced me to root them in distilled water and they produced many, many roots. hope this helps. flora


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

A friend of mine gave me some cuttings of coleus and I think wandering jew... I was thinking of placing these in soil moist and growing "raising" them hydroponically... has anyone done this with "house plants?" What kind and how much nutrients i.e., Miracle Grow should be given to these plants?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Trowelgal and redhotchilipepper,
I have a water softener and I have no problem rooting cuttings. I change the water daily (ok, maybe every other day). Hope this helps.

DinTexas


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

try coleus - they were the first things I rooted as a child - just a bit of water and float a cutting on top

ditto for african violets (that'll upset the purists !!)

or any of climbing heart shaped leaved amazonian plants that you see (at least in australia) in all of the doctors offices

it will also work for monstera deliciosa


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I'm lazy too. But, the water method requires frequent water changes to avoid oxygen depletion and stagnation which will result in the demise of your cuttings. If you're on a well or spring, you'll have double the problem with water that just sits.
Also, like tapla said, even once you've rooted the plant it will be double the effort to successfully transition the plant to a growing medium.
At the very least consider oxygenating with an aquarium pump, but I would say its usually best to go with a more earthy approach to propagating unless you plan to go hydroponic for the life of the plant- a prospect that seems a little too ambitious for me.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Hi,

I had an interesting experience. I always have rooted things in water...butterfly bush, coleus my favorites. This year I wanted to take a ton of cuttings so I put them all in a larger vase. They all rotted. I don't know what I did wrong. I wondered if it was using so large a vase? I am going to try it again, but in smaller containers.

I want to have rooted cuttings ready in two weeks to give away. Is the time of year important? Is there anything that will produce roots at this time of year in two weeks in water?

Adam


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I'm cheap - Rosemary - Lavender

I just went to the grocery store and bought some rosemary branches to add to my receipe for tonight's dinner... I don't need all of it, but it seems like such a waste of money and Rosemary... Can I root this? I would imagine that I should cut some of the end off (it seems kinda woody)... Any suggestions about adding a little liquid fertilizer? Do I put it in a window as previously suggested? How long should it take to root.

Now about Lavender.... I bought some plants this past summer and they were really nice... they were left outside on my picinic table... a majority of the leaves are now black, but there are some green leaves... are these plants salvagable? The soil seems extremely wet too...


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I've rooted quite a number of plants in our hard water, including sky vine, mandevilla, fuchsia, abutilon, tropical hibiscus, etc. Some of these things do take a few weeks. For plants like mandevilla, which have white "blood", it's best to let the cuttings dry off for a few hours before sticking them in water.

I generally remove all of the leaves from the cuttings except the top two. Since I use small, clear juice glasses or baby food jars, the water evaporates pretty rapidly. So there isn't time for it to get too stagnant. But you do, of course, have to keep adding a little more all the time--so the cuttings don't dry out.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

praying hand plant grows in water, so does purple passion,
wandering jew plants, i am trying my petunia right now.
and I piece of purple butterfly bush.
to be continued


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by Pam_AA z5 Berwyn Il. (My Page) on
    Tue, Sep 27, 05 at 8:54

I have rooted Caryopteris in water with no problems. I don't know about the root quality but the rooted plants seem to be the same as the mother. Maybe not leaving the stems in the water too long helps?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

One rule of thumb that I did not see here.

If it has a square stem, it will root in water.

I stick a lot of cuttings in water, let them set until I see just bumps where I know the roots will be, then carefully plant them in rooting medium.

Janie


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I have successfully gotten hydrangea to root in water and now am anxious to see whether or not it will make it in soil. I did notice that it is important to take a cutting of a branch ending in leaves-not flowers. The flowered ones did not root even though I had deadheaded them before cutting.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

My mom roots just about everything in water; wandering jew, coleus, swedish ivy, spider plants, etc. She has multiple little bottles of water sitting in every window sill in the house with a plant in it. She never changes the water, just adds to it when it evaporates. She never feeds them, they just sit there and grow. Sometimes she pots them, but some have been sitting there in their little bottles for years. I think it has to do with the color of your thumb!!! I swear I think she could get frozen TV dinners to root if she wanted to.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Adam- It could be that you used too dense a soil mixture. Make sure it is a light soil mix allowing for air. If it appears muddy or dark, add some sand or peat. Also make sure that all the lower leaves are stripped off so they won't rot in the soil. I always slice the cut end of the plant vertically right before planting, too- to allow for more water to enter. Good luck!


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Hi, I have 2 cents....

Besides Angel Trumpets, I can't think off the top of my head what I have rooted in water.

I have some advice, just from my personal experience - When you start putting plants in water, at the same time make sure to prepare whatever containers you're planning to move them to when they grow roots so that when they have decent roots you can transfer them to soil. I'm an INCREDABLY lazy gardener, so if I don't do this, the plants will sit in the water for a long time, and in my experience, the longer I leave the plants in the water, the worse they do when I transfer them to soil. If I have the pots ready, I transfer them right away and they do great.

Also, if I put one cutting per jar, everything stays nice and clean, but if I put multiple cuttings in the same jar, things start to get slimey and stinky.

I'm really excited about finding this thread! I like rooting in water because I'm insanely impatient with propagation, so starting cuttings in water is my favorite method because I can watch the roots rather than constantly wondering what in the world is happening under the dirt.

Another great way to do propagation for lazy gardeners is starting seeds in moist papertowels/ coffee filters in plastic bags taped to sunny window. Winter Sowing is good for lazy people to, as long as you don't get too carried away.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

WHY NOT TRIE TO ROOT YOUR DH. WITH TENDER LOVING CARE AND
PLENTY OF BEER YOU CAN GROW YOUR SELF A NEW LOVE OF YOUR LIFE.NO YOU DO NOT HAVE TO USE ROOTING HORMONE. PILSENER WILL DO JUST FINE.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Hi! A few years ago I stuck some little branches off a mini rose, you know...from the food store in winter, could not resist them. Wow! was I happy when we noticed a few weeks later they had nice bunches of roots and grew into a way better plant than the one I came home with.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by jroot 5A Ont. Canada (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 3, 06 at 17:55

What a neat discussion going on here. Lots of humour added as well.

So, I guess I could make cuttings of my impatiens, put them into a jar of water a couple of inches deep, go for a week or so to some other place much warmer than Canada, and upon my return expect to see some roots. I love it!
Image hosting by Photobucket


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When to transplant from water!

Getting them to root is good but transferring them to soil is the second challenge!

Again their is a key! The right time is when the roots are an inch to an inch and a quarter long! The reason is that plants form different types of roots for growing in water vs soil but they don't differentiate as to type until the roots get beyond about an inch and a quarter long.

So what happens if you wait too long? The plant goes into shock as it tries to adjust to a change in it's environment. Some just seem to sulk, some will not make it!

John


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Brugmansia!

Michele


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Diascia will root in water, too. It rooted quickly for me last summer on my east facing windowsill.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

pothos roots easily in water... it can actually live for a year under water...


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I can attest to Swedish Ivy, African Violet, Carrot, Sweet Potato Bamboo and Wandering Jew.

Never changed the water.

A guy I knew in college used big wine jugs full of water with fish fertalizer to grow experimental "Weeds" in. He had a fish tank air pump humming in his closet for 2 semesters with very good results.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Pineapple! After you cut off the top of your pineapple, remove all of the fleshy stuff, so that all you have left is a crown with leaves. Strip off the lower leaves, exposing the crown for about 1". You'll see some brownish spots--those will become the roots. Set the crown in a shallow dish of water, and you'll have roots within a week or two. Had one that I kept in water for over a year....just never got around to planting it. Have fun!


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Surely nothing is easier or more dependable than acuba.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Hello,

I am so glad I read this post! I took some cuttings of my waayyy to big coleus that I have been growing indoors since early fall. My daughter got it for me it was just a tiny stick thing...it grew like mad. So, I placed two of the cuttings in water and after reading this post, changed the water often (something I wasn't doing before) well it has nice roots forming! I can plant the cuttings in my garden to enjoy now too!

Thanks so much everyone for sharing important tips!

Keilamarie


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by tantor 6 extreme So.IL (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 18, 06 at 18:16

As for rotting and African Violets, years ago when I first started growing AV's, my aunt showed me how to just break off a leaf and stick it in water and root it. Well, for me, it didn't work quite that easy lots would rot on the end and die, I'd get frustrated and give up for a while before Id try again. Then I got older and more serious about AV's and joined AVSA and various e-mail groups and learned "THE TRICK". AV's will have a tendency to bruise at the base of the stem where it was pinched off and whether stuck in water or soil, will tend to rot at the bruise. However, if you'll take a sharp blade and cut off 1/4" of the stem and then slit the stem lengthwise about 1/2" you'll get oodles of babies. Now with all that said could that be the reason some plants will rot in water and some not? Do some plants bruise and some not or are just not bothered by it? Just an observation.

Tantor


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

;-) Every time I read this title I glance at the bottle of Dasani by my keyboard and muse, grinning "Evian or Dasani, perhaps. But, 'plain old water, never."


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I like rooting in water also and have recently started branching out, trying other plants. Russian sage (perovskia) roots readily in water,as does Mexican petunia (ruella).I plan on trying many different plants in water in this next month and I'll let you all know which ones I have success with.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by
    plant.babies Zone 8-9 .... maybe
    (gw:plant.babies) on
    Sat, Aug 5, 06 at 17:19

good grief! Enough yard plants root well in water that I am giving up my attempt at a propagation misting chamber for these things.

The thing is -- do you use a piece of new growth, or hardwood, say, for hydrangea? I tried rooting hardwood dogwood and lilac sticks in potting soil, but yuck, they didn't make it. To be fair to them, it was above 95 degrees where they were sitting for part of the day.

:)


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Dear Lazy- many things will root in water, but the question is, why would you want to do that? When you transfer them to soil, all the water roots will break off. They are extremely fragile, and they don't absorb water from soil anyway. So once you pot up your cuttings, they have to start growing soil roots just as they would have if you had started them in soil in the first place.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by
    plant.babies Zone 8-9 .... maybe
    (gw:plant.babies) on
    Sun, Aug 6, 06 at 15:03

Lazy -- if you keep pebbles in the water, this won't *generally* happen.

The roots rub the pebbles as they grow, which allows them to form the very tiny hair roots, which are what take up oxygen when planted in soil.

THEN be vewwy, vewwy careful when transferring to soil -- gently prod the soil around the roots after making a nice hole to spread and settle them, w/o man-handling the roots too much.

I have had no problem taking virtually ANY houseplant and some 'patio' plants from water to soil if I use glass beads, rocks or pebbles in the water while they are rooting. Water very gently - just enough to settle the soil around the roots. Don't saturate the pot.

When I used to just use plain water, pothos and some philo did not react well to the transfer to soil, and took a long time to recover.

About 10 years ago I lost a mother plant (about 25 rooted babies placed together into a big pot), because I took them from plain water directly into a heavier potting soil and then over-watered on the initial planting.

I have never tried to root other 'patio' and yard plants in water because I did not really think of it, but I am definitely going to give that a go!


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I have rooted pepperomia (leaf and petiole only), and wandering jew stems successfully in water. I'm now trying to root a small piece of ZZ. The roots have definitely grown, but now I am nervous about potting it up. If I potted it in clay pellets, would the water roots still break off?

I am simultaneously trying to root some pieces of ZZ in soil, but so far no luck. It's only been a few weeks, though, so I'll keep being patient. Too sad, I have a dying ZZ which I am desperately trying to propagate before it breathes its last...

-Sarah


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I just rooted Virginia Creeper in water took 3 days for roots.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by
    plant.babies Zone 8-9 .... maybe
    (gw:plant.babies) on
    Tue, Aug 8, 06 at 13:50

here's what you can do if you've rooted a plant in water only ---

dribble pebbles into the container of water each day until the pebbles fill it to the point where roots are attached to the stem.

Even though this may take a few days, it's worth it.

This method 'scrapes' the roots like soil would, causing it to form the little side roots that it needs to live in soil.

:)
plant.babies


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

avocado - gentally stick tookpick on both side of the large avocado seed, sit the seed half way in wather using the tookpicks as a bridge. Sit the seed/water in sun. Saw it on HGTV somewhere. Sounded neat.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

For several years I have had very good success rooting cuttings in willow water(my little willow tree is a rooted cutting) coleus, new guinea impatiens, red threadleaf, any sweet potato vine, variegated ivy, persian shield& annual geranium. When the cuttings have roots 1-2"long I put them in their own pot(l2-16") and in about a month I have a lovely lush pot at no cost.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I was going to start a new thread on this but after searching for the topic of coffee I found this one and think it might apply. I know this isn't very scientific so I don't claim any validity to any of this but ... I was trying to root some Swedish Ivy for grins and giggles so I took an old salsa jar and punched several holes in the lid and plunked in cuttings. A few days later I had about two cups of cold coffee left over so I thought why not? I took another jar and the only change was diluting the coffee half n half. The coffee jar has rooted much faster with tons of new growth already. The difference is amazing. I dunno why it did this but I just had to share with someone I knew would care. LOL! DH just rolls his eyes. ;)
Have fun!
Christina

Oh, just a final thought? Can I root catmint in water? I'm gonna try so if I don't get a response I'll post and let ya'll know. Hugs!


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I rooted clematis is water once by accident. Just had a blossom in a vase & the next thing I knew, roots! Left it in there till it developed a nice healthy set of roots. Then I left it in there a little longer & the water dried up & I never got it planted!


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Will Christmas Cactus work?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by cacye Denver,CO (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 26, 08 at 20:03

I have somewhere around here(and I am not ever going to be accused of being organized)FOUR PAGES(size 8 font)of stuff you can root in water, both inside and out. I have myself rooted mallow,pothos,rosemary,mint,clematis-wild, not tame,which, by the way, is good for headaches)coleus,begonias(the angel wing ones take MONTHS and have a low success rate, but the ones that are not tuberous are fast and can be kept in water for years),arrowhead vine,philodendron(stem cutting),corn plant,ficus,thyme,spider plants,swedish ivy,sedum,pelargonium(geraniums of all kinds),christmas and easter cactus,rhipsalis(not sure of spelling),dumb cane(get a good sized section of stem for it)crotons(slow),schefflera(the small leaf type works faster and looks better than the big leaved ones),kalanchoe. I have heard you can root citrus trees,maple trees,fig trees,cherry trees,mandevillas,bouganvillas,willows,sweet potatoesand most common herbs. When I find that section I copied out of a book, I'll list a few, or maybe just post them on a site if enough interest is generated.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Does anybody add hormones like BA, NAA, or IBA... to improve water propagation? It's not hurt, right?. What the concentration of solution do you use?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

What about trumpet creepers?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I used to do a lot of rooting house plants in water. What I found and what can be one of the reasons for some of the varied success is it is important to NOT use clear glass containers if the samples are in direct sun light. The cut surface and submerged portion of the stem get contaminated with algae/slime and rot.

Flora is right with her comments about changing the water, it makes up for other problems by keeping competition from bad bugs down.

My favorite container for rooting were 12 oz amber glass beer bottles. You either clean the cut by rinsing under running water or change the water a day or two after starting so you aren't trying to root in slime soup. For fast rooting plants the wash without a water change was enough to get the cutting to the stage where it could be transplanted. The small orifice doesn't let a lot of dust settle so you don't get as much air borne contamination.

It's important to note that some plants will take months to root. You almost have to think of it like keeping a gold fish bowl. If algae starts growing before roots start growing, all is lost.

Rick


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

This is great! Im just starting out and have bottles of things hoping they will root.
I bought root stimulator at Lowes but want to start in water until I get roots (it just seems more natural).
Someone mentioned not to put cuttings in clear containers? All of mine are in clear vases, bottles, etc. thinking that it would be good for the sun to reach the plant. Whats best?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I'm the one who said to stay away from clear containers. If you use a colored glass or something that blocks sunlight, you will reduce algae growth in the root zone. Clear glass can work fine, it is just that it has one more way to fail if algae starts growing.
I have a tendancy to reduce the number of ways things can go wrong and the amount of effort you have to put in. To me clear glass means more frequent water changes and/or algae.

Rick


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

For the last few years, I have only bought one little 6 pack of impatients and ditto petunias. Then I just clip off the taller pieces, stick them in water and in no time have whole bunches of plants. Right now I am thinking about saving glass containers that I would usually throw away and starting to root in water then adding dirt gradually then when the thing shows roots all over through the glass just breaking it and plopping it in the ground. By then it should be warm enough. Has anyone tried this?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Wow I'll have to try the petunias this year. Thanks for the tip.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

wow love this topic!
i stuck honey suckle vines in water "vace" last year n they rooted, lol i just wanted somthing pretty in a vace n ended up with another plant.
i have started house plant in water, spiders, devils ivy, wanderingjews, i have brugs cuttings giving to me that were rooted in water n done well.
i see lots of plants in here im gonna try now.
n i have forsyenthia's yes they will root in water but if you want to get lazier like i did lol just dip the cutting in a roothormon power n stick it in the ground, i did that n now have a bunch of bushes, the one i did 4years ago is now bigger than me,


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

"Hi, I have 2 cents.... FROM SOUNDGARDEN
Besides Angel Trumpets, I can't think off the top of my head what I have rooted in water.

I have some advice, just from my personal experience - When you start putting plants in water, at the same time make sure to prepare whatever containers you're planning to move them to when they grow roots so that when they have decent roots you can transfer them to soil. I'm an INCREDABLY lazy gardener, so if I don't do this, the plants will sit in the water for a long time, and in my experience, the longer I leave the plants in the water, the worse they do when I transfer them to soil. If I have the pots ready, I transfer them right away and they do great.

Also, if I put one cutting per jar, everything stays nice and clean, but if I put multiple cuttings in the same jar, things start to get slimey and stinky.

I'm really excited about finding this thread! I like rooting in water because I'm insanely impatient with propagation, so starting cuttings in water is my favorite method because I can watch the roots rather than constantly wondering what in the world is happening under the dirt.

Another great way to do propagation for lazy gardeners is starting seeds in moist papertowels/ coffee filters in plastic bags taped to sunny window. Winter Sowing is good for lazy people to, as long as you don't get too carried away."
------------------------------------------------------------This is from Soundgarden, I think this is a great idea, to have pots ready as that is always my problem. Is always remixing the soil, I don't always like to use the bagged potting soil as I like to add things to it to extend it adn not be so expensive.

Also, Millie's idea of twist ties around plants stems or vines that have been put into a circle and placed in a flat dish of water is an excellent idea. You get more rooted plants that way in one action.

I am rooting all kinds of plants in water all over my house. They seem to like the west/north facing corner winkows in my kitchen and the south facing window or glass blocked side light next to my front door. They are placed on the flag stone floor next to the floor heater and also and the the bottom of the glass block side lite. I also have hanging plants on a tall plant stand you can get at walmart. I buy them when on sale and actually use them in my fish ponds for waterlilies, but this one came in handy for hanging pots to be over or near the floor heater and close to the glass sidelite facing south.

Sometimes certain plants do rot if I'm not checking them enough changing the water or actually getting them out and potted up. Sometimes I cut the ends of the rotted stems to just where the bumps for roots are beginning to appear and rinse the end and then place back in clean water and I have well water.

They seem to get worse, the cuttings when I some diluted fertilizer and have it in too long. This is where just "doing it" will give you a feel for how a certain plant likes to root.

I have several of these plants potted up and doing fine. The one plant that gives me problems is the creeping ficus.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I've rooted salvias, lilac, hydrangia, streptocarpus, basil, ivy pelargonums, mexican oregano and fushias in water. it's not laziness so much as time management, putting the days garden clippings in water, vice trying to find pots and planting medium last minute. it is also easier to monitor the glass jars parked right by the kitchen sink window daily for progress.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

A quick tip - if you do use clear bottles in the windowsill, tape newspaper (or regular paper) to the side of the bottle that is closest to the sun... (Don't cover the top portion, just the portion with the roots). You'll still be able to clearly see your roots, but you won't have to fight the algae as much. Also make sure the top of the bottle is big enough to pull the plant out once it's rooted... You don't want to tear all your roots off when pull it out to plant.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Boy, do we ever like to root in water!
I've just transplanted into my garden several rooted cuttings of penstemon 'Husker Red' that I cut in the late fall when my plants were going to get hit by the frost.
They look really healthy. Am doing 'Mystique' now just because I could find only the one plant.
Have done gardenias, hydrangeas, quince, lots of others.
Only have failed with camelias. Will keep trying though.
Keep posting!


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

i recently did tomatoes, pineapple, avocado, some flower i don't know what it was, rose, and lilac bush.

the tomatoes all worked really well and are all in soil now, 3 of the pineapples rotted and 2 are doing well -in soil now- the rose had started when i gave it away, and the unknown flower has started, and the lilac brank i just started a few days ago so still waiting.

all had been dipped into liquid hormone.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

"Nobody answered TrowelGal's ? about if you have a watersoftner will your cuttings still root in the water"

As a rule of thumb, most water from a water softner is NOT the best for rooting. The main product used to exchange the "bad"?? minerals in the water is sodium chloride..salt..NOT good for a lot of plants, but a lot of variation in the plant world as far as "tolerance" to the sodium. BUT...some peopole use potassium chloride in their water softners, which is much better/softer on the forming roots (and to drink and water your plants with).

Schmoo


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I've rooted papyrus grass in water, confederate rose, figs, and various annuals and perennials. Although the fig formed roots, the roots were too fragile to make the transition from water to soil, and all of them fell off. This didn't entirely kill the fig plant, but like some one else mentioned, it's like having to root the same plant several times.

I've tried pear, lemon, limes, christmas holly, and various other plants with out success, but that doesn't mean it's not possible. My experiments have been with just plain old tap water in a jar or cup, and with a bubbler I built myself, also with plain old tap water.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

**JUST WANT TO WARN ** IF YOU ARE ROOTING FORSYENTHIAS IN WATER OUTSIDE KEEP IT UP AWAY FROM PETS ,MY SIL'S MOTHER'S POODLE DRANK OUT OF THE CANTAINER AND DIED.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I am not that Lazy, but I am very FRUGAL!!!! When buying fresh fruits I keep the clear containers, that I use for propagating different pieces of plants. tiny small cold frames.
During my researches, I was surprise to see that the mixture for starting seeds or cuttings was 10% of peroxide added to water, and the same ratio added to the 1st soil mixture [soil and peat moss etc...after transplanting....
Anyone use it??


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

My spouse tossed a handful of cuttings from houseplants into a guppy tank.

Among my observations:
-- plantlets from spider plants perk up quickly upon being tossed in water.
-- the plantlets from the spider plant with solid green leaves root very quickly.
-- the varigated plantlets of the spider plant are much slower to root.
-- a two foot cutting of pothos starts rooting at the nodes near the growing end first.
-- all above will survive and perhaps thrive in a fish tank for many months


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Additional one time observation to be added to the Sept 28 posting above.

-- A spider plant plantlet got sucked up against the grating at the bottom of the pump intake. It is growing roots faster there than the other spider plants i.e. in this one case at least it seems to like the moving water.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Hi Albert 135:
someone told me that fish tank water is good for plants. So I guess that is why the plantlet stuck to the pump intake is doing so well, getting all the good stuff.

After reading tgbas 6b posting on Tue, May 13, 08 at 16:16 I quickly covered the glass jar I am trying to force my (expensive) Amarylis in. It's been 2 months in the glass jar now, the base barely touching the surface of the water and it is still not doing anything. The roots the bulb came with starting to get soft and mushy so I cut that away. I even change the water to a solution with kelp fertilizer. I just checked it and it has a slimy film over and among the remaining roots. A plant is supposed to be in the soil, which means darkness for the roots. I guess that make sense and explains the draw-back with glass jars. Anyway, that's my 2 bits.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Coreopsis roots in water perfectly. I just found that out by mistake this year. I had 100% success with several different cultivars.


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others

I rooted the following in water recently!

1.) Echinacea...yes that's right. It's trickier than just sticking them in water though. They require air circulation!

2.) Honeysuckle


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

does this mean that we should all just go to the nearest nursery and clip the plants we like (without being seen :) and go home and water root them?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by brandon7 6b (like 7b now) TN (My Page) on
    Sat, Sep 11, 10 at 1:21

Marlene,

No, please be sure the owner of the nursery has a clear view of you and a free phone line to contact the authorities, before you take cuttings.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

In reading all the postings, I still want to know if anyone has rooted Daturas. I have the upright kind with huge white fragrant flowers. I put some cuttings in clear glasses and at first they were looking like they'd root. They developed bumps along the stems, and some even bloomed,but now they look wilted and ill. No roots yet, and it's been maybe a month. I admit I haven't changed the water, only replaced what was evaporated. These cuttings are outside on my deck tucked around larger plants to keep them out of full sun. Also I have several cuttings in the jars. These Daturas are Brugmansias ?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Once you have the plant rooted, how long before you can plant it in dirt?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

This past fall I had some buck eye seed. I took three toothpicks inserted into the seed to hold part of it above the water level. All rooted except one, which rotted. You must do this on very fresh seed as a older seed is too hard to insert a toothpick.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by jolj 7b/8a-S.C.,USA (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 26, 11 at 12:10

I showed my son how to root a pineapple plant in water.
He now has 4 plants, which he will keep in doors in the cold months for 3 years, until they bloom, bear fruit & die.
Pineapples reproduce in the wild by falling over & rooting the fruit tops. If you buy ripe fruit the roots are already starting, under the bottom leaves.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

When is the best time to take cuttings to start in water?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

In my experience most things that can be rooted in dirt can be rooted in plain water...

BUT...

*It will sometimes take longer to root. My guess is that the water diffuses away the plant's natural rooting hormones so it takes longer to build up higher levels.

*Putting artificial rooting hormone in water doesn't work; the hormone breaks down in water or doesn't stay in contact with the stem.

*Some very drought-tolerant plants are not used to water and will rot in pure water (but these plants tend to be really really easy to root in soil, sometimes even by sticking stems in the ground in spring when weather cool and moist.)

*If water levels change over time (it evaporates and you re-fill it) it can be hard for some plants to figure out where the "soil surface" would be and it takes longer for a cutting without a growth tip to form a new one.

*Plants that form bulbs or rhizomes often can't be rooted in water; not sure why, but maybe the bulb/rhizome needs more oxygen than other roots.

*You need to make sure no dead/dying plant tissue or leaves are below the water level. The reason is that when these tissues are dead, they rot, and the bacteria/fungus that rot them use up all the dissolved oxygen in the water and will kill other plant tissue and newly-forming roots.

*Cuttings rooted in water like more light - maybe even direct sunlight in a very bright window which would dry out a soil-rooted cutting but is fine when the plant can suck water directly out of the glass.

*Plants that are heavy feeders can't stay in water long because it's really hard to put the proper amount of fertilizer in water without burning tender roots or leading to huge bacteria growth... as soon as they grow roots, immediately move them to a sheltered location in soil.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I just got a big basket of Chrysanthemum on sale.
The flowers are mostly dead but all the leaves are green.
Can I take a lot of cutting and root them now?
If so, what the best way to root them this time of year?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

basil_davis2,

Did you check google? Just type in 'chrysanthemum propagation cuttings' or something like that, and check out the results! Or, do a search of this forum (see the search tool at the bottom of the main forum page)!

This thread is about rooting in water, a method frequently tried by those that haven't done much research and don't understand the disadvantages. You'd be better off with a google search. Then, you could ask specific questions, if you still have them, in your own thread.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

You have to put alot of effort into gardening!


Best wii games see all the best wii games on the internet.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I got some hydroponic basil at the supermarket. It had lots of roots. Planted some in a pot. Most of it has died. I am not sure any is going to survive.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Water roots going into soil..... let the water roots get longer than a inch or two, as long as the plant is looking good, then cut the roots in half before you plant into soil or whatever.
Yuk water, some plants don't like to inter mingle in the water for me sometimes, who knows?! Don't let your cuttings rest on the bottom of your jar, they should be suspended and the cutting should end with a node unless that cutting will root from the stem itself. Clear glass or tinted glass, I have had both get slimy and stay clean. Size of jar does seem to matter sometimes as well. Too big of a jar with small cuttings results in stagnant water. Too small of a jar with crowded cuttings gets yuky faster if the cuttings are mixed. I do it like this: imagine a small mayo jar with 8-12 pencils in it(suspended)... this is a good ratio for me so far as size and number of cutting to the container.
Keep in mind everybody has different results for various reasons, so don't get discouraged. After all you don't live in my house (log home with no central heat and air and a woodburning heater in the winter!) and your sunny windowsill is not the same as mine!

love2weed originally posted this on May 4, 2005 and it is still going almost 7 years later. To all who find this thread and take the time to go over all the comments, you will find a way that is suitable to you....

"If It Were Not For The Patience Of Trial And Error, We Would Not Have Such A Variety Of Beautiful Plants Before Us Today!"... Me :-)


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

  • Posted by tomva 7-central virginia (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 12, 12 at 9:23

Hardy Hibiscus are easy to root in water

Here is a link that might be useful: Hardy hibiscus rooted in water


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hoya lanceolata 'Bella'

Wow, who knew that all these things would root in water?!

I doubt anyone will make it all the way to this comment, but just in case . . . I regularly root cuttings of my hoya in water. I don't see that particular houseplant mentioned anywhere else in the thread.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Mexican Violets, be careful, they can be a bit invasive. This just kinda happened. I love the flowers so cut off a dozen long stems that were blooming and plunked them in a vase of water. About a week later I saw roots. Funny thing is they continued to bloom. When they totally filled the vase bottom with roots, I emptied most of the water out poured in some potting soil and they kept right on rooting, so I planted them in the garden. Kinda strange way of getting more plants.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Awesome info! Gonna try myself :)


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I'm rooting a tuberous (non-stop) begonia in water. It seems okay. It's in a clear jar (but with a label on, so algae is okay) not in direct sun but with a lot of light. So far so good. Its in rainwater. I'm topping it up with rainwater each week. My question is... are the little bugs swimming in the water a bad thing? Should I start again? I'm reluctant to start with fresh water bc i read on a begonia propagation site that begonias, when rooting, release a particular substance into the water, that they need. So given the cutting has been in the water a week or so...no roots showing yet...I'm just not sure which way to go on this one.

Any ideas anyone?


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Came by to see what's going on in this discussion and only read the entry directly above mine (the very last entry until I replied to that, since I had plenty to say without reading more...)

"are the little bugs swimming in the water a bad thing?" Probably mosquito larvae.

"Should I start again? I'm reluctant to start with fresh water bc i read on a begonia propagation site that begonias, when rooting, release a particular substance into the water, that they need."

I think the substances you're referring to are hormones such as auxin (in all plants) and IBA (in willows, used in rooting hormone.) That's good stuff but would be trumped by the need to get rid of the mosquito infants (by changing the water) if mine to decide.

*** just general comments on water props...

Water is a method I often employ for various time periods (usually just days) for various propagation and temporary storage attempts, but to say it's easier and more friendly to the lazy is a mistake, IMO. There is usually more work involved, especially when going on outside because of the mosquito larvae issue, and because the ultimate step of being in a pot of soil could usually be achieved initially instead of the intermediate water step.

When failing at propagation in general, if I were to divide things simply by size of attempted material, the vast majority of the failures would be smaller-sized pieces. If subsequent attempts are made with larger pieces, success rates go up. Tailoring the technique slightly to accommodate different material can also make the difference, like timing/weather, different potting media, addition or removal of humidity tenting, light exposure, and other variables. It's really not as simple as "soil failed, so I'll try water" since very few plants are actually designed to grow roots in water before they rot.

I just think folks should be honest with themselves about whether this is easier or not. I also think it's kind of pessimistic, like "if it roots, I'll find it a pot." Assume it will and start out right from the jump! The next effort you should have to make is when it needs a permanent home in the ground or a bigger pot.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

Has anyone had first-hand experience at rooting lime/citrus cuttings in water? I tried to root kaffir lime cuttings in soil, but one by one they all turned yellow and died.


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RE: I'm Lazy--What can you root in plain old water???

I had a knock out rose bush that needed pruning. I took the clippings from that and rooted them in water. I got the most beautiful bushes out of that. Today they are about 4 feet tall and just as big around and loaded with the same beautiful roses as the parent plant.


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