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Hydrangea 'cuttings'

Posted by Jen26 USDA zone 6/MO (My Page) on
Wed, May 4, 05 at 22:29

I have never rooted a cutting before, but this year, while messing around with my hydrangeas, I accidently snapped off a stem. It was a new green stem. I quickly dipped it in rooting hormone powder and have stuck it in regular potting soil. I'm keeping the soil damp, misting it and storing it in an east-facing windowsill. Am I wasting my time or is there a chance this will work? Thanks.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

  • Posted by Tom_w Z7 - Ala (My Page) on
    Wed, May 4, 05 at 23:27

It may be a bit early for soft cuttings from Hydrangea, because the new growth is still a bit too tender, but what you are doing may very well work. It is NOT a waste of time. If you haven't already, remove some of the lower leaves, and only leave 2 or three at the top. You may want to move it into a position where it doesn't get any direct sun. In order to meet your goal, of making a new plant, you must keep the leaves from drawing all the moisture out of the stem before it can generate new roots. Mist it often and you may be rewarded in a few weeks.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I am also having problems with my cuttings. Below is what I posted in the Hydrangea forum.

I just started eight soft hydrangea cuttings yesterday. They all looked like they were the perfect size (5-6" like all the pictures I have seen) and ready for cutting. I put them in soiless mix and placed the pots in ziploc bags. They were in an area that gets part sun but it was only 55 degrees yesterday and I did not think they would get too hot. Well, when I checked them this morning the leaves were all wilted and dead looking. The bags were very moist.
I am not sure what went wrong so fast but would someone please offer suggestions. I have rooted rose cuttings before and as a matter of fact I had many rose cuttings right next to the hydrangea cuttings and the roses are all fine. I do not use ziploc bags for the roses, they are under pop bottles but everything else is exactly the same.

Will the hydrangea cuttings still root without leaves? Should I just take the wilted leaves off and leave the stems. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Orlando


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

  • Posted by Tom_w Z7 - Ala (My Page) on
    Thu, May 5, 05 at 13:29

Orlando,
You still have plenty of time to make more cuttings during the next couple of months. Next time DO NOT let the sun shine on sealed plastic containers. The plastic container is great for keeping the humidity high. You have also created a very good solar heat collector. Those green leaves and dark soil collect the heat, and the plastic, with no vent, keeps it. Temperatures can go really high in a short period, which will cook the tender plant inside. Your current cuttings have more than likely not survived.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I, too, think it is a little early for trying them. I have heard that the stems should be ripe enough to snap at the point where you want them to take root. Clip off all but top 3 leaves, and then use scissors to cut those three in half. Keep them in a humidity chamber...soda bottles or under plastic bags in full shade, but not dark. They are reported to root fairly fast...like 2 to 3 weeks. I would guess that the end of May or early June would be a better time.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

Why can't you just root them in some water??? I broke off a stem today by accident from my Oak Leaf....stripped off the leaves except for the last 2 smaller ones and put it in water. Is there any reason that will not work? Thanks in advance.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I took fall cuttings of Nikko hydrangea last year.I just dipped in hormone and stuck in a half shade/sun bed next to the house with soil that has a high clay content.I checked them today and most of them are getting leaves.
Tammy


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I haven't done a whole lot of hydrangeas, but the ones I have rooted were extremely easy. I didn't lose a single cutting. I used rooting hormone and a peat/perlite mix in an enclosed container under lights, but I'm sure they'd root easily outside as well as long as you keep them under a plastic bag or something similar and in the shade. I've even had a cutting root in a vase of water, so that might work. But I think your chances are less sure.

However, I would wait at least a couple weeks to a month for the shoots to be firmer before taking cuttings.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

Hydrangeas are so easy. I take my cuttings after blooming is over. Strip all but the top two leaves - don't even bother cutting them in half. Dip in rooting powder and put in potting soil in the pots I want them to grow in for the next year. I put them on a covered porch so they will be in shade, don't cover them with anything because summer is so humid, and mist them 3 times a day with a squirt bottle. I check the soil to make sure it is slightly moist. When cold weather comes, I heel the pot into a bed close to the house and forget about it for the winter (keep in mind my winters are not that cold). So far new growth has shown up in spring on every cutting I've tried. About half of them put out one bloom the first spring. Have tried this with mopheads and lacecaps, and it has worked with both. As long as you remember to mist and don't panic when the leaves look droopy, this works like a charm.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I read an article in the local paper about this, and I made 2 cuttings 2 months ago and one is definitely still alive putting out leaves, the other is budding I think. This is how I did it. I made the cuttings from new growth shoots that had buds on them. I made a 45 degree cut on each. The writer suggested putting them in potting soil against the side of the pot, keep damp, in the shade.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I took ten cuttings from a bush in my childhood home about 6 weeks ago. Cut off all but one or two leaves, dipped them in rooting hormone, and stuck them in 4in pots of potting soil. I have kept them moist in a shaded area of my garden. I lost 5 of them, but 5 are still doing great. No new growth yet, but I haven't given up hope yet!!


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

Hi All....Try layering for Hydrangeas, cuttings work well but you really have to stay on top of them so they don't dry out and wilt....I layer mine and let nature do the work


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I took 6 cuttings from various hydrangeas I have, both mophead and lacecap in April. No cover whatsoever. I used rooting hormone, kept watered, in a shady location. All 6 have rooted and are growing well. I've now moved them to a shady porch and will plant out later in the summer. It takes 3 or 4 years to get a nice sized bush, but they are worth the wait. I have several beautiful bushes from cuttings.

Joy


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I've got a second hydrangea from what I think stan6637 refers to as layering... you just take a branch and pull it down to touch the soil, pile a bit more soil on top of it, then weigh it down with a rock (or whatever). This branch began it's own new root system and created a second shrub.

Of course, I guess this wouldn't be that great if you are planning to give away the plants or put them in lots of different locations. Still, you very quickly end up with a pretty mature plant!


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I am baffled....my mother in law takes cuttings from hydrangeas everywhere she is able to, and comes home, shoves them in her garden, and that's it....and her hydrangeas are fabulous. She never used rooting hormone, never even started them in water. Is she just lucky? The more I read about propagation, the more intimidated I become.


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RE: Hydrangea 'cuttings'

I am baffled....my mother in law takes cuttings from hydrangeas everywhere she is able to, and comes home, shoves them in her garden, and that's it....and her hydrangeas are fabulous. She never used rooting hormone, never even started them in water. Is she just lucky? The more I read about propagation, the more intimidated I become.


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