Return to the Plant Propagation Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
What type of cutting (leaf/stem/semi-hard/hard/root) do you take?

Posted by yardenscapingyahoo 7 (My Page) on
Wed, Jul 27, 11 at 5:04

Hi everyone! and thanks in advance to anyone that replies! I'm on a super tight gardening budget this year - and by super tight I mean the only way I'll be getting flowers/plants for my container garden is from taking cuttings/seeds from what I already have and what my friends/family are willing to let me take little "snips" of. I'm fairly new to propagating from cuttings - I have Purslane and Blue Daze (Evolvus) down pat, but I don't know what type of cutting and when to take them from ... pretty much anything else, I don't know if it's even possible to take cuttings from some stuff. Here's a list of the plants I have at my "snipping" disposal -

Clematis (Elsa Spath, Jackmanii, H.F. Young - I had 'the president' but it pooped out the first day it was 100 degrees - boo)

Balloon flower (platycodon grandiflorus - just the regular one and P.g. 'Mariesii')

Gaura

Black Eyed Susan

unknown variety of honeysuckle (I bought it a few years ago, it was supposed to be Scarlet Trumpet Honeysuckle, but I've yet to see it do anything other than smell like honeysuckle in the spring)

Burgundy Blanket Flower

Tizzy Blanket Flower (I don't know the scientific name, my friend told me the only info she could find was a sticker on the container that said "tizzy blanket flower" with a barcode)

Hosta (32 jillion varieties)

Flowering Quince

Coreopsis

Yucca

Chrysanthemums (I'm pretty sure they're Florists' Mums - they're 'single' flowered - my mom got them at the flower/pumpkin tent in front of the mall when I was like 8)

Columbine

Canna (My grandpa is going to mow over them if I don't come dig them up this weekend - can you move them any time or will they just die? Most of his don't have flowers and I don't know if it's because he doesn't water or if it's because he mows over them almost every year - can you grow them in containers?)

Jasmine (not sure on variety, it may have climbing "tendencies" but there isn't anything for it to climb on, it's sprawled out about 2 or 3 feet in every direction and the middle of the clump is maybe a foot high)

Mandevilla (how it's still alive after 2 years and me not bringing it inside for the winter, I have no clue but I'm not complaining)

Petunias (just regular ol' petunias, not the wave kind - you can't propagate the wave kind right? because they're patented?)

Million Bells

Wax Begonias

Impatiens

Sweet Potato Vine

Angelonia

Dahlias (not sure what kind or if you can even take cuttings - my mom usually treats them like annuals)

Coleus

Esperanza

Thank You so much for reading this far down! Like I said before, I don't know if all of these things can be propogated from cuttings/roots/seeds on the plant or not - but if it's possible please let me know which way to do it! I'll probably be experimenting with my own stuff a lot but I don't want to go snipping stems off my friend's plants if I need to do root cuttings, or divide stuff at the wrong time and end up killing it all. Is there a general rule when it comes to propagation or is it "guess and see?"

One more thing and I swear I'll tell my fingers to shut up :)
Suggestions for plants that flower/fill out pretty quickly like purslane/blue daze from cuttings?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: What type of cutting (leaf/stem/semi-hard/hard/root) do you t

Hi everyone! and thanks in advance to anyone that replies!

Hi, and welcome to the discussions!

I'm on a super tight gardening budget this year - and by super tight I mean the only way I'll be getting flowers/plants for my container garden is from taking cuttings/seeds from what I already have and what my friends/family are willing to let me take little "snips" of.

Anybody with cash can go buy a truckload of beautiful blooms - even have someone plant and care for them. What you want to do takes love, patience, consistent effort, forethought, determination, and IMO, can be extremely satisfying.

I'm fairly new to propagating from cuttings - I have Purslane and Blue Daze (Evolvus) down pat, but I don't know what type of cutting and when to take them from ... pretty much anything else, I don't know if it's even possible to take cuttings from some stuff. Here's a list of the plants I have at my "snipping" disposal -

Here's my experiences with some of your list...

Clematis ... I had 'the president' but it pooped out the first day it was 100 degrees - boo)

Clems like to be in full sun with their roots cool. Next time, try placing a potted plant so that it shades your clem roots during the hottest part of the day. This may help it get going. Remove flowers after the petals fall off so the plant does not waste any energy making seeds. Clems take a few years to establish. They make seeds but it is uncertain if seeds will make the same flowers as the parent plant. Mulch is very helpful for Clems.

Balloon flower (platycodon grandiflorus - just the regular one and P.g. 'Mariesii')
- makes seeds that are ready when the seed pods develop openings at the top. A long-lived perennial.

Hosta (32 jillion varieties)
- divisions as soon as the summer heat passes or early spring. Hostas live for a LONG time.

Columbine
- makes seeds that are ready when the seed pods develop openings at the top. Individual plants are short-lived perennials.

Canna (My grandpa is going to mow over them if I don't come dig them up this weekend - can you move them any time or will they just die? Most of his don't have flowers and I don't know if it's because he doesn't water or if it's because he mows over them almost every year - can you grow them in containers?)
- makes tubers that can be moved about any time. If grandpa mows them, no big deal. I think the ground (vs. in a pot) is preferable for anything perennial in your zone. Try to put them somewhere where they won't be soggy all winter but will get plenty of water in the summer. Mowing and/or lack of water could both lead to lack of flowers. You can cut large tubers in half to make more, and each year the tubers get bigger and make "pups." They also make seeds but people don't always have an easy time trying to get these seeds to sprout. A long-lived perennial as long as the tubers don't rot in the winter.

Jasmine (not sure on variety, it may have climbing "tendencies" but there isn't anything for it to climb on, it's sprawled out about 2 or 3 feet in every direction and the middle of the clump is maybe a foot high)
- sounds like confederate jasmine. If so, it's more of a "leaner." The term climbing can be misleading because it usually means something that leans and needs to be woven or tied to a support to stay "up." A long-lived perennial.

Mandevilla (how it's still alive after 2 years and me not bringing it inside for the winter, I have no clue but I'm not complaining)
- That's very cool! Was it in a pot? Sounds like you know this is not supposed to be hardy in zone 7.

Petunias (just regular ol' petunias, not the wave kind - you can't propagate the wave kind right? because they're patented?)
- seeds are usually available on your plants, but you never know what a petunia from gathered seeds will look like. It's possible to overwinter them in containers inside, but unlikely to go well. Correct, you're not supposed to propagate patented plants. A perennial, don't know about its' normal life span where it's hardy.

Wax Begonias
- I don't know if these are perennials in zone 7 or not, they are here, 8b. These are fairly easy to keep inside over the winter in a very sunny window.

Impatiens
- can overwinter in container indoors, needs more sun than in summer (winter rays are very weak,) a sunny window.

Sweet Potato Vine
- cuttings are easy! You can have SPV all over the place in just a month. Needs LOTS of water.

Dahlias (not sure what kind or if you can even take cuttings - my mom usually treats them like annuals)
- makes a perennial tuber that can be dug up and stored in cool, dry place until spring.

Coleus
- cuttings are easy! You can overwinter them in water on a windowsil, or bring plants inside. Remove most of the large leaves first. Perennial shrub.

Is there a general rule when it comes to propagation or is it "guess and see?" Unfortunately, no, there's no general rule. BUT there is "the bible." The Well-Tended Perennial Garden by Tracy DiSabato Aust. The internet is, obviously, a much larger and wider-scope source of info, but this book's worth reading cover-to-cover for any garden newbie. Try checking it out at the library first to see if you want to invest. Plant-specific propagation info is easy to find on the internet.

One more thing and I swear I'll tell my fingers to shut up :) Aww, if folks don't want to read it, they won't. The more said, the more there is to discuss.

Suggestions for plants that flower/fill out pretty quickly like purslane/blue daze from cuttings? Sweet potato vine, Coleus, Tradescantia zebrina, Tradescantia pallida, spider plant, heart-leaf Philodendron, Pothos, Zinnias, butterfly bush come immediately to mind.

There are many discussions on these forums about annuals (cheap) that are really tender perennials (not-so-cheap.) Learning about those can be a great way to be frugal. You may also enjoy checkin out the frugal gardening forum. People also exchange seeds and cuttings on the exchange forum, and you can also get seeds for about anything that makes seeds for postage. You can also look for seeds at parks, garden centers, businesses with flower landscapes, and by asking neighbors. The folks in your area may have a plant swap at times, also. I think there is an Okla. forum. That's where you would look for info about a local swap.


 o
RE: What type of cutting (leaf/stem/semi-hard/hard/root) do you t

I didn't think Blue Daze would grow from cuttings! Please tell me your secret! Purslane should reseed itself. I think it would be really easy from cuttings. From experience I like the biggest, fattest cuttings. for Purslane I'd try a 3" to 4" cutting removing the flowers and all but a few leaves and stick it in soil and keep the top misted or sprayed gently daily with the hose. Honeysuckle by cuttings 4" to 6" long. Wax begonias from cuttings. Good luck! Let us know how you do!


 o
RE: What type of cutting (leaf/stem/semi-hard/hard/root) do you t

The dahlias you treat like potatoes. You plant a tuber in the spring, in the fall you dig up all the tubers it has produced. You can get a few to many tubers from each one you planted. When you have too many, you can start eating them. They are delicious and each type of dahlia has a different flavor and texture. Before you gawk, this is what the aztec raised dahlias for...for food.

Another edible flower that multiplies like crazy is the day lily. The bulb tastes nutty.

Obviously culinary herbs, but as far as decorative stuff that you can eat as a staple, these are good starts especially if you are on a budget and are hungry.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Plant Propagation Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here