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Easy Propagation Chamber

Posted by little_dani 9, S. Tex Coast (My Page) on
Wed, Oct 5, 05 at 20:34

I make a little propagation chamber that is so easy, and so reliable for me that I thought I would share the idea. I have not seen one like it here, and I did look through the FAQ, but didn't find one there either. I hope I did not miss it, and I hope I do not offend anyone by being presumptive in posting this here.

That said....

This is what you will need.
A plastic shoebox, with a lid. They come in various sizes, any will do.


Soil less potting mix, half peat, half perlite, or whatever is your favorite medium.
A little clay pot, with the drain hole plugged with caulking or silicone. If this is a new pot, scrub it with some steel wool to be sure it doesn't have a sealer on it. You want the water to seep through it.
Rooting hormone powder or liquid, or salix solution from the willow tree.
Plant material, snippers. I am going to pot some Plectranthus (a tall swedish ivy) and a Joseph's Coat, 'Red Thread'. I already have some succulents rooted in this box. I will take them out and pot them up later, DH has a new cacti pot he wants to put them in.
You can see here, I hope, that I fill the clay pot to the top with rain water, well water, or distilled water. I just don't use our tap water, too much chlorine and a ph that is out of sight.

I pour a little of the hormone powder out on a paper plate or a piece of paper, so that I don't contaminate the whole package of powder. And these little 'snippers' are the best for taking this kind of cuttings.


This is about right on the amount of hormone to use. I try to get 2 nodes per cutting, if I can. Knock off the excess. It is better to have a little too little than to have too much.
Then, with your finger, or a pencil, or stick, SOMETHING, poke a hole in the potting mix and insert your cutting. Pull the potting mix up around the cutting good and snug.

When your box is full, and I always like to pretty much fill the box, just put the lid on it, and set it in the shade. You don't ever put this box in the sun. You wind up with boiled cuttings. YUK!

Check the cuttings every few days, and refill the reservoire as needed. Don't let it dry out. If you happen to get too wet, just prop the lid open with a pencil for a little while.
This is a very good method of propagation, but I don't do roses in these. The thorns just make it hard for me, with my big fingers, to pack the box full. All kinds of other things can be done in these. Just try it!

Janie


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Very nice. There are lots of folks that don't have a lot of space to play that this would be perfect for. Easy to move around too!

Cindy


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie
Love the idea and thank you for the pics.
Question...do you wet the medium before you add your cuttings or do you let it get wet solely by filling up the little clay pot?
Evelyn


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie,
I love your idea. I am going to do this one myself.
Thanks for sharing.

DinTexas


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

You would want the medium to be damp when you stick the cuttings. You will notice condensation collecting on the lid, but this is fine. The condensation will keep moisture in the medium.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I believe some have/are using the larger clear storage boxes from Wal-Mart. You can drill drain holes and put the mix directly in the tub part, or use them upside down and place small pots on the lid...covering it with the bottom part. This works well for taller cuttings of woody ornamentals. No one that I am aware of, has posted pics of the whole process...very good.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Nice, easy setup. Thanks for the pics!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I found a deep clear plastic container at WalMart this morning that I am going to use to root some cuttings of firespike, althea, and jatropha. They are 13"l x9"w x10"d, and they have a lid.

I don't put holes in the bottom of mine. The water seeps through the terra cotta pot so slowly that I have not had any problem with the rooting medium being too wet.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Neat-o!!!!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Do you keep the lid closed /sealed? Do I need to poke holes in the top for a little fresh air or occasionally open it up and then reclose it?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I keep the lid closed. If it seems to be waterlogged, I prop the lid open with a pencil for a little while. You want to just be sure you don't forget it and let it dry out.

I don't poke holes in it anywhere.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Is it necessary to mist? I started some vinca cuttings like this and when I left it for three days, I lost several.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

It is necessary to have damp medium to start with, and to have the little pot filled with water. Leave the lid closed, condensation will accumulate on the lid. No need to mist.

I have lost cuttings in one of these little chambers. But I have lost cuttings in almost every other method I have ever tried too. I always have to fiddle with things to learn it for myself. I lose far fewer cuttings with this method than with any other.

A lot depends on what you are trying to root. Would you normally put vinca cuttings in a mist?

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

How long does it usually take for them to root? Something like coleus?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This is a great idea - I'm definately going to give this a try.
Annie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Great idea Jamie, thanks for sharing it with pics.

I just posted my methods since you inspired me too:)

John


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Different things take differing amount of time. coleus should root pretty quickly. I stuck some fire spike cuttings in a tall container, and it works wonderful for things like that. I may try some rose cuttings in the tall container.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I have used this method before, many years ago. Thanks for reminding me. It does work very well.
Now what do I do with Morning Glory seeds?????
Brenda


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Can this be used to start plants in January or February? I live in z7 Middle Tennessee. Do you use seed starter soil mix?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I use it year around. I am in zone 9, and I leave them in the unheated greenhouse or on the porch, but I bet if you found a spot in a kitchen corner, or on top of the fridge, they would do just fine for you.

I use 50-50 peat and perlite, but you could use seed starter mix.

Good luck.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I did it! I used Lantana and bouganvillea. AND.....I used field dirt. We will see how it works out. I also couldn't find a shoe box with a clear lid. Mine has a blue opaque-ish lid. I might fail miserably, like the lady who made fish soup with beef and replaced the carrots with rutabagas, or something and wondered why her soup tasted so awful....but I will let you all know how it goes!!!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Actually, I prefer the opaque lids. It seems to shade my cuttings, just offers a little more protection from the sun.

Jendudley, I would really like a report on how the field dirt works. Are you sandy there, or do you have some of the Laredo soils? We have black gumbo here.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hi Janie have you ever used this chamber method for seed also? Cj


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I don't know that your seedlings would get enough air circulation to prevent 'damping off'. This is designed to keep your cuttings from drying out, and is therefore condusive to rooting.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Love this idea! I am trying it now. I am going to try red twig dogwood, forsythia, butterfly bush, hydrangea and gardenia in seed starter mix. The pictures are great!

Thanks!
Jean


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Way Cool Beans!
I love it! I appreciate the pics, & think you have a great idea!
Thank You for sharing!

=)


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Have Yall Heard Of Pharr Texas :-P well The Rio Grande Valley....It Is Sooooo hot here i dont think u even need to cover the box lol nahh im playing well this is a good idea i tried a boxwood cutting to how it works but i made my own invention i made a newspaper pot about the size of a can of corn and potting soil and covered it with a half cut 2 liter plastic bottle will that work to i mean i put the top so it can stay moist ok well i dont know what im writing anymore :-P so ill stop here


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

My good friend Jerry, who owns and operates a wholesale nursery says to try taking cuttings around the last couple of weeks of May. He sticks hundreds of cuttings then, says the wood is as close to perfect then as it will ever be.

Jerry could root a tooth pick, I do believe.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

What a great idea, and the pics are really good to see.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

little dani, how hot is it in your section of texas now? can you tell us a few of the cuttings Jerry would be taking now?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Right now, the temp is 96 degrees, May 27th. It got hot early this year.

Jerry says the main thing is the night temperature. Night temps should be consistantly 70 degrees or higher. A couple of weeks ago, we had a cool front come in with some 50something degree nights, and growers who took their cuttings before then are having problems with them now.

We are rooting roses, roses, and more roses. Crepe Myrtles, boxwoods, jatropha, sages and salvias, azaleas, loropetalum, hydrangea, gardenia. Everything is fair game now!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Thanks, Janie! I root cuttings in the clear containers. The nice thing is, I can see the new roots from the bottom and sides. With your information, I will make a few improvements.

Barbie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Night temps in my area still get down to the 50's. Should I keep my propagation chamber indoors at all times???


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

If you have a porch to put it on, out of the sun, it will probably be o.k.

I have kept these things in the house, on the porch, under my bed.......just don't forget where it is! LOL

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Here in NY night temps don't get that warm for a long time. I want to try this method, would it be better to start them in the shoebox indoors on my heat mat?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Really, in the chamber, I start them all the time, any time. I just protect them from freezing or overheating.

Just try it. It could be that I would think your cool temps would be refreshing, as it is really, really hot here now!

You could do some both ways, and find out for yourself what works best in your area. It is very difficult to advise you, and I don't want to tell you wrong.

I lived in Elmira, NY for several years, but that was so long ago, I just can't really recall what the seasons were like. I know winter is very long.........

How would you do it otherwise? Would you use the mat if you were just sticking them in pots? Do you do different things for different plants?

I know, for example, that I have (in 1 qt. pots) cuttings of buddlia, acuba, firespike, peach sage and pineapple sage, and an exotic coleus that I had never seen before. Some are in the shadehouse, some are sitting under a tree on a birdbath. In a greenhouse, I have plumbago, esperanza, cestern, powder-puff, crepe myrtles, corkscrew willow, fig, lemon tree, lantana, and several different varieties of verbena, and several varieties of tomatoes. Quite a hodge-podge. I also have several chambers going with lots of different coleus going, some firespikes, and althea. Also, I am trying tomatoes and eggplant in the chambers too. I have bulb scales in a separate chamber dedicated to that alone.

I propagate because I love it, because I can't help myself. For me, it is fun, and I like to try different things to learn what works best for me. I sell, trade, give away lots and lots of plants too, but the real reason for me doing it is that I love it! I would not do it if it wasn't fun, or if it gave me a lot of grief.

I would counsel to relax, keep everything as clean as possible, and know that probably everything you stick is not going to take. Don't bet the farm on it. Also, know that every variety does not act like every other variety. Roses, for example......

Some, like Mermaid, Seven Sisters, Aimee Vibert are soooooo easy to root. Others, like Mrs. B.R.Cant just are the MOST MISERABLE things to try to root. Two of fifty would probably be average for me. If I am lucky. So.....I don't even try to root Mrs. B.R.Cant anymore, and I don't worry about it.

And I always stick more cuttings than I need. If they all take, I have some to share, if not, maybe I will get what I need for my project.

I hope you will let us know what you do, and how it worked for you.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie,

Thanks so much for posting this. I just got myself a couple of shoe boxes and am ready to begin. How many cuttings can you fit in a box? I know it depends on the kind of cutting, but is it okay if the leaves touch each other for instance?

Thanks.
Marianne


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I do put them in pretty close, but allow a little room between them. I might put 25 little cuttings in one box. I prop the lid open almost daily to allow for air circulation. Be careful that you don't set it in the sun.

I am rooting tomato suckers in some of my boxes now.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie, not sure if I missed it or not but for woody cuttings, how long are the cuttings? I want to try jatropha that I trimmed yesterday. Love your propagating chamber, going to try it. Thanks.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I use a deeper container for things like jatropha, althea, hibiscus, and such.

I make my cuttings about 6-8" long, and leave a set of leaves on top. I have seen people do cuttings not more that 3-4" tall, and they do fine too.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This is great, Janie. I'm going to try blueberries with this method. Northern, highbush type. At our elevation in Idaho, the nights will soon be getting cool (please God, hurry with the cool) so I suppose I'll try rooting them indoors. Does anybody know if it's too late (August 8th) to root this year's green stems with blueberry?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janey, I just wanted to thank you for this method and your bringing it to the forefront again - I have always used the jar-over-pot method, but this is so much easier, with the watering chamber keeping the soil just the right moistness. I have rooted so many things with your method, that eluded me in the past. Try it, folks - IT WORKS!

I took the liberty of posting under another heading on a new thread so everyone can read it - I hope that's ok.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Sounds like this is a great idea. I would like to take cuttings of my new Purple Emporer Sedum now (September) and somehow keep them over winter in the house in order to plant outside in the spring. We have already had one light frost so I must do it soon. I cannot put them out much before the end of May. I never keep houseplants so just wonder what chances of success for this idea might be.
Thanks much. Farmergirl


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I think you would have great success using this chamber in the house.
I do it all the time. I never worry about light until things have roots.

Good luck.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This is great! I am going to Wal-Mart to get the supplies. What about using corks to plug holes in pots? I don't really want to mess with silicone and a bag of corks in kitchen dept. at WM is way cheaper
Thanks for the info.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

So long as the hole is filled, I don't think it matters.

You can use plumbers putty too. It is not so messy, and works as well. It will dry out and shrink tho. Keep an eye on it.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

janie

great post, what a simple solution. i use my large continers upsidedown on a heat mat to root plants and start seed although i woulden't start seed in them with a lot of heat. how did the bulb scales go?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I rooted a bunch of Helichrysum (Licorice), which is great because I usually start with about 50 cuttings to end up with a couple rooted. Don't know why I have some much trouble with this one.. This method worked great!!

However, how do you get the cuttings out with completely distributing the soil and other cuttings?

I needed to resort to a flexible spatula to get under the cuttings and loosen the soil and remove the cutting.

Anyone have any better ideas?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I usually use a tablespoon, borrowed from the kitchen. It works good to get under the roots, is small enough that it doesn't disturb the neighbors, but big enough that it will carry just about any cutting out of the box.

I am glad for all your successes with this method.

Bulbs are doing o.k.

That is a little bit different process, in that I use a different medium and it is treated beforehand. I will post about it when I can get good pictures of the 'sprouts'.

Also, I have been using this method to start lots of herbs and tomatoes. It works great for them!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie

Excellent post! I really want to try Jap. Red Maples from seed (new to me). Any thoughts on this? I know this is for sticking cuttings but it looks so darn easy I'd like to try the seeds!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I don't know about Japanese Maples, but I would say go for it. I have grown seeds of Bird of Paradise, brugmansia, and plumeria, and I had no problems at all.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I'm going to try using one of the deep clear organic greens/spinach containers for some cuttings using this guideline. I potted up some geranium cuttings but didn't cover them at all. They're losing leaves one by one, so I think I'll put them in the "chamber". I got some lamium "White Nancy" from a city flower box yesterday, and will put them in there, too.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie,

I'm not certain if the lid should remain closed or proped open, as I've read conflicting reports within this post. I'm going to stick bougainvillea, poinsettia, hibiscus and some ivy's, each varity in their own box. How do i determine if lid should be open or closed? Also, is it better to have a clear lid or a solid color (grey non opaque) lid with a clear box?

Thank you for helping a novice, ;-)


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I usually stick my cuttings and close the lid and leave it alone. I check to be sure it has enough water, or isn't water-logged. I seldom have a chamber with too much water, unless the medium was too wet to start with.

So, with the medium just damp, and a full well, my cuttings are going to be constantly moist, and they never dry out if I leave the lid closed. The water will collect on the underside of the lid and water the plants over and over again. If you open the lid, the water will evaporate, and the chamber will dry out.

Clear lids are fine. I actually preferr opaque lids, as they don't seem to heat up like the boxes with clear lids, but either will do. Just depends on what is available.

The thing I always stress when I share propagation information is to try everything. If you aren't sure, and you don't have an expert there to show you exactly the one foolproof method, try them all. And don't just stick one or two cuttings. Stick a lot of cuttings! The extras, you can always trade or share with a friend, or find a little space in your garden.

And be sure to keep good records! You think you will remember all these results, but it is hard, we stick so many cuttings, try so many experiments.......Write it down, write it down, write it down. I have been keeping a garden journal for years, and in the past few years those journals have become some of my most valuable possessions. Everybody knows to NOT mess with my journals.

And one other thing. Make a section or a file for each thing. If you are sticking all those things, make a file for each, instead of an entry for cuttings stuck on 12/01/06. In the future, you can add to info you have on Hibiscus, and soon you will have a wealth of information on what worked with hibiscus at such and such a time.

Best of luck.

Janie


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RE: So Easy Propagation Chamber

I was wondering about the open lid/closed lid references, and I went back and read all the posts. In July, I said I was proping open the lids just about daily, and that gave me pause also. I had to check the journal to see what i was rooting then, and it turns out that I was doing seeds. I don't think this is my best choice for starting seeds in summer. Sorry for any confusion.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I was looking for fire vine all year at the local nurseries to fill in a section of fence next to an existing fire vine and then came upon this post and gave it a try in late Oct. Used very large clear container and was successful in rooting 8 fire vine cuttings and a one bouganvillea and one purple bleeding heart. I have been so busy since that I just got around to putting them in 1 gallon pots. Some of the plants were 1ft high!! Started a new conmtainer right away with 4 types of passion vine and more of the spectacular purple bleeding heart i have on back walls.

As for air/watering/light, I keep the container under a very shady tree. check the container once a week, making sure the medium is always slightly moist and the pot always filled. Sometimes sprinkle water on the plants and every other week leave the lid cracked opened for a couple of days to circulate the air and control moisture.

I have come to love this method for two reasons. One, I get to select the exact plant I see growing and duplicate it genetically, picking the ones with the best color and tolerances. For instance, passed by an amazing red passion vine in neighbors yard and asked permission for a few cuttings, hopefully next year I will have the same plant growing in my yard. Two, I save considerable money, I have more time than money these days!!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Wow! You made my day! I am so glad you are having good results.

When you say 'fire vine' what do you mean? Is it like the orange Mexican Flame vine?

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

I have a hard time rooting vines sometimes. I usually have to resort to layering them to get some to root. My red passionvine is so aggressive, I am going to whack it back, and not propagate it! LOL

Thanks for sharing your good experience!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Yes, sorry i meant mexian flame vine, i ama newbie.

The one in the picture looks great, is it your yard? Laso, the reason I am propegating passion vine is to get free plants and filling in an ugly wood fence about 75ft. thanks agin for your help.

BTW is there any tips on getting that much color in your flame vine? if it is yours? And how do you post pictures.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Not my yard, one that we landscaped for a client.

I don't know where you are, except for zone 10, which is warm. Would you be interested in some Hyacinth Bean vine seeds for your fence? I have more than my share, and they are great vines. Also, I have some moon vine seeds, and some shell pea vine seeds. Love vines.

Just give that flame vine good compost. Too much fertilizer, it will grow green and not bloom much. You could use a little bloom booster, if you just thought you needed it. This vine grows on cotton trash compost.

I will find the link on how to post pics and post it here for you.

Janie

Here is a link that might be useful: our hyacinth bean vines


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

thanks, i live in miami

yes, i would love some Hyacinth Bean vine seeds. Any problem growing next to passion vine, if so, i can plant accross the yard. also, would love some moon vine and pea vine seeds. I am also a lover of vines due to their vertical scale. let me know if i need to send you postage.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Just send your address. Click on 'my page' and send an email with your snail mail address.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Should I sterilize my containers , and what about reusing the 50/50 perlite/peat mix. With my second container I have used new mixture and different container, used the old mixture in my potting soil mix. should I be worried about fungus/mold?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

You can wash your boxes with warm soapy water, and rinse well. Since you don't use much medium in the box, put the old in the compost pile and start all over.

I have never had much of a problem with fungus or mold.

Janie


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Inexperienced person question: how do you tell when things are rooted?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

A gentle tug should tell you that answer.

If you feel resistance, you probably have roots.

If it comes out easily, you should be able to see no roots there. teehee.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

8-6 Thanks Janie! hehehe

Would you post this info in the Texas gardening site? I think everyone there would like to see it.


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I will have to suggest this to some of my customers looking for as simple prop chamber. This fits the bill nicely. Thanks for sharing
Happy Growing David


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Thanks for the info! I never thought of the pot in the box. I have used strawberry plastic containers for prop but never thought of the pot inthe middle.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Just be sure it is not a glazed pot, so the water can seep through it. Otherwise, your little cuttings won't get any water, and they will die fast.

Good Luck

Janie


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Thought I would try this for impatiens cuttings, as my seedlings were tall enough to pinch back 2 weeks ago.
The cuttings are happy campers and all starting to root.
Now, to find room to transplant all the newbies!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Wow! What a great thread...still going since 2005! I'm going to go get myself some shoeboxes and little little clay pots tomorrow.

I saw that another newbie asked what I was wondering: how do you know when you have roots.

My questions are: how much root do you need before you can remove them and plant them....and how do you remove them safely, especially if you have something rooted near something that you don't yet want to disturb (assuming that you might have different things in one container)

Thanks again for the threads!
PS...you said that you might even have your rooting box under your bed....how do they get enough light that way?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

If I put the boxes under the bed, it usually contains cuttings that take a good while to root. They don't need light to root.

If you tug on the plant gently and it gives you good resistance, you probably have enough roots to move it. If it is putting on new foliage as well, you definitely can move it. I would rather my plants make more roots in the ground where they are going to live than in the chamber boxes.

The rooting medium, if it is peat/perlite, should be fairly loose. I usually just scoop the plants out with my hand, or use a big spoon for something with fragile stems, like impatiens. Just be sure you have a place to put them when you scoop them out of the box. You don't want to have them setting out in the air for any length of time.

I hope y'all have fun with this. I am going crazy here, sticking cuttings like my life depended on it. Why do we do this? LOL

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

janie

i also use my hands or spoon, but since i have very little time to pot, i have been leaving my cutting way to long in the chamber, and when I remove them they suffer b/c medium is too loose and roots get dislodged. I am think of trying to put mini peat pots in the container first then fill the container with the meduim, leaving about 1/2 inch of the peat pot sticking out, also leaving the pot in the middle. this way when I am ready to pot i just pull the peat pot out carefully and the root system is largely undisturbed? your thoughts?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

That might work.

I think that whatever works for you is fine. I would hate to lose my little plants because the medium fell off. Mine falls off too, but I have a pot ready to put them in or a hole dug in the garden ready to plant them out before I try taking them out of the box. I don't think I ever lost a plant from it.

Good Luck, and let us know what happens.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Just curious what kind of cuttings you do put under the bed that don't require light. Do you use those long, wheeled under-the-bed storage boxes for lots of plants?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Heheehe, I hadn't thought of using them. I just use clear plastic shoeboxes with lids.

Just about anything can be put under the bed. Light is not generally a requirement for cuttings making roots. I take them out and check them fairly often, and when they start offering resistance, I take them out from under the bed.

Light is required for growth of plants and for blooms and producing fruit. Not for making roots. I could be wrong on this, but this has been my experience.

Janie


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Janie,
I love love idea! And thanks for taking the time to give such detailed instructions and photos. I want to propagate some shrubs this year and I am so going to try this.
Patsy


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Woooeee! I've just decided to give cuttings a try and then I stumbled across this!
A few questions...
- You said FAQs, I don't see a FAQ for this forum. I'm just looking for a general cuttings FAQ on top of this method.
- Was the BoP you tried the desert BoP or the 'tropical' kind?
- Is this for perennials too?

Thankie!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Tropical BoP.

This is for EVERYTHING!

If it will root, that is. Some things just won't root.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Good Luck, Billy Gardener!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Great idea! I am going to try this idea for some of my rose cuttings - has anyone ever used this chamber idea for rose propogation and had any luck?? I think I will try this idea for some and the rose rustler's technique for others and see which technique works best (I have at least two cuttings from each rose bush). I am also going to try and be vigilant in keeping notes on each technique for the step by step process as they start new growth, etc.

Please let me know if anyone's tried this container technique for rose cuttings. Thanks.

Bump.

Julie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

My original attempts with this method were unsuccessful because I kept the medium too wet...everything rotted. I'm wodering if I can reuse this medium now that it has dried out or should I replace it with fresh?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I have used it for roses, and had good luck. I am partial to roses that are easily rooted, the antiques or OGRs. I did use a deeper box, as I like to use a longer cutting for roses and a few other things.

You could reuse the old medium. I reuse mine sometimes, but with things that root easily, or things that are common.

I root a lot of plants that are common. They are great to use in masses, require little care, and they are pretty too.

Good luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Thanks, Janie!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hi Janie. Thank you for the info. on roses. I did go out a few days ago and bought a couple taller boxes for my roses. Do you think it would be safe to put in up to 4 roses in one box (it's pretty big) with a 4" pot in the middle and each rose in a corner???

Julie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hi, Janie. I love this 2 year old thread and how helpful you've been with your technique and everyone's questions! So, I set up my chamber about a week ago and in it I have: lantana, cape primrose, buddleya and a couple of other misc things I snipped from my friend's bushes -- about 16 cuttings altogether, plus a couple of succulent leaves (may be too moist for them, but thought I'd give it a try).

Here's my experience so far: I have to refill the resevoir every couple of days. The moisture doesn't seem to get all the way to the corners of the box, which are a little more dry, so I've occassionally misted the contents. The lid does not fit very tightly, so there is not that much humidity inside.

Most cuttings seem to be doing well. However, the lantana are dropping their leaves... I only left 2 leaves on each cutting when I stuck them, and I cut the leaves in half, but they are turning black and dropping off. There does seem to be some new growth -- tiny baby leaves -- on some of the cuttings. Is all this normal? One of the cuttings has a bit of fuzzy mold on it's tip, but only one so far. Is this a problem? Should I remove this one from the box?

I've been trying to resist tugging at them, but I did so today. Some do seem to be resisting and others, no resistance yet. I'll give it another week or two. I have the box on my kitchen counter, so hard to resist checking it often.

Thanks!! Maggie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Somethings root faster than others. It just depends on so many factors, I would hate to hazzard a guess. I would keep an eye on the fuzzy one, and if it persists, yank it out. You might do well to just yank it out anyway, and replace it with a fresh cutting.

I have had lantana drop all it's leaves, then put on new ones. I have also had hibiscus grow the most glorious foliage you ever saw, but didn't have a root one. I just left them alone, and they did make roots eventually.

You might want to try putting 2 little pots in the chamber, one in either end, if you think it would help. I have been known to pull things out and look at them to see if they had roots, but that was a long time ago.

Julie, I would put more than 4 cuttings in that box. You could put all 4 in one corner, and fill the rest with something else. Or take more rose cuttings and fill it up. I don't know about using a 4" pot, but I think it would be worth a try. Just do use well water, rain water, or distilled water. Anything except 'city' water.

Good Luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I want to thank the original poster!

I've had numerous cuttings take this spring and I am very happy with the results.

I used an old African Violet pot in the middle of mine and it seems to keep the soil just perfect not too damp not to dry. I sit the box behind my shed and it is shaded all day long. I top the pot up with water about every 2-4 days as my container is a storage box and doesn't have a seal around the top some of the extra moisture just evaporates and escapes.

Works perfect.

- Andrew


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This is such an exciting day as I am a newbie. I can't wait to get started. Thank you, thank you, thank you. I love this website and would love to know of more. madjhk


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I just wanted to thank you for posting this information. I started spirea 2 or 3 weeks ago using your method. I used what I had around the house, because I didnt think it would work for me (due to a previous failed attempt using jars and plastic). Plants that I took the cutting from looked half dead. We are in a drought and temps are in the 100s. I live in Ohio. This is what I found to use.
1. spagnum peat moss(thats all I had, 4 inches in bottom of container)
2. 60 quart rubber maid container
3. little clay pot with silicone in the hole
4. rooting hormone
5. tap water
6. placed in shade on deck
These cuttings are about 9 or 10 inches long. I only removed leaves from the bottom of stem. I added water to the pot last week it was about 1/2 full. That is the only time I looked in there since the initial planting. I pulled one out today and it has 4 roots about 1/2 inch long. Should I wait another week or so to put in pots? I am so excited this worked!!! I also stuck some in pots all those died.
Thank You for taking the time to help us out.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I think you got it figured out. I would wait a week or so, to let the roots grow a bit. Don't dig them up to look at them tho. That is real hard on them.

Good Luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Wow what a site my first time to visit the propagation site. After all these years it's nice to find other people who enjoy stuff like this. I thought I was all alone in this world. Went to Wally World and got to boxes today, one is full of cuttings,will fill the other in the morning. Thanks so much Janie
Norm


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

What a great post. I am so new to propagating and find the most difficult thing for me is to keep the young rooted cuttings alive once I pot them up. Of course that might be due to my lack of being able to keep house plants alive for very long. My only rooting success, so far, has been my hardy rose of sharon that I rooted in potting soil this spring. Now I am stressing how to safely over winter them.

For my first try at the RoS cuttings, I tried the shoe box idea under a shade tree, but my DH damaged the box with a weed eater and did not realize it to give me a heads up, so every thing dried out and died, before I realized what had happened. Conditions were perfect this spring with many days of rain for my new RoS cuttings to root in pots filled with potting soil, uncovered, and kept under a shade tree.

Now after reading everyone of the above follow-up postings I am ready to try with the box and pot method again. Maybe a Spiraea, an Oregon Grape, and some Desert Peace roses. Only this time putting them either under my bed, or on a closet shelf, sounds like the safest place for me to try this method.

Of course then I will still need to find out how to keep them alive when I repot them, and then allow them to go dormant this winter in a manner where they can come back and releaf again next spring.

Janie has mentioned often that the cuttings do not need light to root. When rooting the cuttings in the dark is there any purpose to keep the few leaves at the top. Do the few top leaves that are kept simply die anyway from the lack of light during the rooting time?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Mine don't usually, but I have never kept them in a deep dark, dark place. They might, in that case.

Please let us know about the Oregon grape cuttings. I have never tried rooting cuttings of them, and it is one of my favorite plants.

Heck! Just let us know about everything!

Good Luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I appreciate the patience of the Propagation forum for the 'bump up' of this thread. Its especially meaningful to me and I appreciate all of you that contribute here. Thank You!
--------------------------------------------------
Little Dani ,
thank you for sharing this great experience.
This is my first visit to propagation forum @ gardenweb although I have been a member for years. I cant wait to get started.
Question : Its now early October and as I begin this wonderful process I imagine I will have several little plants in just a few short weeks. I plan to keep them in a heated greenhouse from November through March.
This is a 5 month stretch . Im also sure I will have to change 'bump them up' to larger pots as time goes by.
A hanging basket size it probably going to be their last up size but could I start them off in that size ? I hope they wont grow to large in the greenhouse before march. I have no experience with a green house ( but have access to one this winter ) and wanted to make up several baskets to sell in the springtime for the children's crisis center.
Thank you so much for your advice .
From the land above the sky , I wish you well
Mountain_grown Appalachia Mountains - Tennessee


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I think I would root them first, and do several. Then transfer them to hanging baskets and grow them out.

The reason is the difference in soil requirements. Rooting cuttings require no soil actually, but a 'medium' instead. They don't need to be fed until after they are rooted, either. To start them in soil is to invite pathogens which can kill your cuttings.

After you have them rooted and putting on new growth, plant several in a hanging basket with good potting soil. When they begin to put on new growth, I would start feeding them with a weak water soluable fertilizer. Increase the strength of the fertilizer as they grow.

Good Luck! and let us know how it goes, too!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie ,
Thanks for the help . I appreciate it.
Congratulations on the longest continuously running thread at GardenWeb . Its 2 years today !
Thank you very much.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This IS a great thread! Keep up the good info.
If May in Texas is a good time to take cuttings, when is a good time in Maine?

Martha


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

When the evenings are consistently 70 degrees. It might depend also on what you are trying to root. Some things like it a little cooler to root.

Maine sure is a long way from here....

We are about 180 miles from Mexico, on the gulf coast.

I have never been to Maine, but I have lived in cold climates before. Close to Lake Superior in Michigan, and at Elmira NY. I was young then, and I could handle it. I will never forget learning that we had to plug our car in when it wasn't running, lest the engine freeze. I was just amazed. LOL.

Now, if it gets down to 40 degrees, I pull out the flannel jammies, and throw extra quilts on the bed. My blood is too thin, I think. Or, I could just be a sissy.

Good luck on your cutting and rooting.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie,
I just came across this thread. I wanted to bump it up for others who haven't seen it before. I've been a GW member for years now, but this has been my first trip into the Propagation forum. (I'll be visiting often now!)

I am so excited about this. I can't wait to go get a container or two, some pots, and get started! Unless it roots in plain ol' water, I have no luck with rooting cuttings. You have given me hope that maybe I'll be able to add to my garden without having to grow the majority of the plants from seed!

Thank you!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

i had to bookmark it so i will remember it!! thank you so much for bumping it up!! you are so awesome!! i think windyacre did one something like this in the winter sowing forum. but not exactly like this. so every bit helps!! because one way may work for one person and not for the other person while a slight varieation may help work for another person!! and the thing for the roses!! WOW i am sooo there!! LOL my mom does roses and lets me trim them back, so i get to go ahead and keep all the stuff, very tradable!!! LOL if i can just propagate them!! LOL


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

  • Posted by
    Elesha Denison 7b
    (e3run@att.net) on
    Sun, May 18, 08 at 15:13

This is soooo awesome! How about taller cuttings, like oleander or esperanza? Did I not read thoroughly? Sorry if I missed a comment about this. This sounds so easy and so trouble free. I am rooting cuttings right now, in water (oleander), but I just trimmed up my oleanders not too long ago, and am searching for a good container.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hi Janie,
Thanks so much for sharing your propagation chamber with all of us! I'm going to make one for myself. I have only one question. I've been trying to propagate Jade, which everyone says is so easy, but I've been having 100% losses due to stem rot -- obviously I've got things too wet. I've tried a 1/2 soil-less potting mix to 1/2 perlite (plus rooting hormone), and it seems to drain very freely, but still I get rot. Can you suggest another medium which might give me better success? Perhaps being in your propagation chamber will do the trick, as it will be less likely to be over-watered. What do you think? Have you propagated Jade? Or has anyone else? MacThayer


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I don't think I would put the jade into the propagation chamber. I think you would get.....rot.

too wet.

Maybe you need to dry the jade before planting it, like you would geraniums.

Just break off a leaf and allow it to lay out of the sun for a few hours, or even over night. This would cause a callous to form. Then pot it in damp peat/perlite, or whatever favorite medium you like.

I am not promising this to work, but seeing as how everything has resulted in rot to this point, I would have some confidence that it would work.

On the question of taller cuttings, just use a taller container. You might have to put an additional little pot for water in, but if the area is about the same, I would leave it with just one. Oleander roots so easily that we usually root it in the ground, but we are in a very mild climate.

I appreciate the kind words.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This is such a fantastic idea, I just bought stuff to try it out! I'd love to hear more success stories about different things people have rooted with this method. Anyone?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

What a great idea! In a college floraculture class, we made a little propagator in a large can, filled with sand over gravel and using a piece of hose inserted down the inside edge to add water. This looks so much easier and certainly larger and more useful. I'm going to take cuttings of my beautiful variegated weigela as soon as it stops blooming and try your method. Cool!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I saw weigela for the first time this year. It is not something that is normally grown here. It is beautiful, and I am crossing my fingers that it will do well for me here.

Best of luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

How do you know when it is time to move the cuttings to the open air? I had 4 gardenia cuttings in a pot covered, under a bag, and they were doing really well. I gave them a little tug, and they had some resistance, so I removed the bag, and the wilted really quickly. so, I recovered them, but they never fully recovered. when is it time, and how do you do it?
thanks,
jenny


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Maybe don't be in a hurry to repot them, especially this time of year. I try to do the transplant thing as gently as possible. Water, water, water, and almost dip them out, so as not to dislodge the soil from the roots.

EVerything here dries out so bad, with the winds. It is VERY humid, but they still dry out. Maybe set them in a protected spot, shade most of the day, and out of the wind. Don't forget to water.

Maybe take the cover off, but leave them in the pot you started them in for awhile yet. If they are rooted, you can feed them a bit, half strength at first. Let them put on additional foliage, and make sure they have a good root system. They will need all they have as they are trying to get over the shock of transplanting.

That is the best I know to tell you. Maybe somebody else might have some ideas.

Best of luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Has anyone had any problems with this method and mold? A couple of the cuttings I put in developed some interesting growths. Any thoughts? Maybe put the container somewhere else?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

The medium could have been too wet? You need enough moisture to keep the medium damp, but not puddles of water in the bottom of the chamber. Where did you put it?

I have had things that molded, but it doesn't happen often. I just started over.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

i've been going to make one of your giant chambers, but haven't got around to it yet, LOL but what i have been doing is this, i have been using the 4" pots and those cell packs for my rooting thingi, put dirt in it, then i get the things that i'm trying to root, dip them in the horomone, then i put them in the dirt, then i put the pot,or cell packs in gal or 2 gal size baggies, blow air into it til its all puffed out, zip all the way shut. then i wait a few weeks and i usually have roots. ohhhh and i make sure that my plants are misted befor i put them in, and the soil is damp, i've been using stay green soil with aqua control i find it at lowes at 10.97 , in 3 cu ft size. it feeds for 9 months!!! i LOVE that!! LOL and its very light when its not wet, so i love that too!! LOL hope this helps someone who cant make the chamber just yet!! LOL I'm a major procrastonator!! LOL as my mom says!! she say's "leanne!!! stop procrastinating and do something about it or it'll never get done!!" (my middle name LOL) you know your introuble then!!! LOL) Medo :'))


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This looks like it could be a great space-saving technique. Based on my reading, it doesn't appear that stacking the boxes would have any negative effects.

It's very similar to the pot in pot method I use. BUT, the possibility of stacking box upon box of cuttings thrills me.

If anyone has tried stacking them and had problems, please let me know BEFORE I fill the extra room. (Obviously, I will need enough room to rotate the boxes through the stacks so that I can check each one.)


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I stack them all the time. I have a potting table that I can line them up at least 4 across,end to end, then stack 4 high. I do move them around and keep an eye on them all.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

hi janie

ive been on gw for a couple of years but just came across this thread. its awesome! i have cuttings on the way and had a question. i made a chamber while brainstorming but now i wonder if i should do it your way. i put 3 pots (50peat,50perlite) in a cake dome with a heating mat do you think i could add the water pot into the dome without having to use the whole bottom as the place for the rooting medium?

great thread keep it going
jaci


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I don't think so, because the water seeping through the walls of the pot would not be seeping INTO the medium in your pots. At least if I am imagining this right. Is the dome upside down, or rightside up?

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

its right side up with a plastic trash bag on top to keep in the humidity. i made it this way so that i wouldn't have to lift the tank to get into it, (i have puny biceps;) and it works a little too well. i have to open the top to let the leaves dry out in the morning. you usually cant see into it because of the condensation.

the reason im trying this is that im trying to root hoyas and they dont need much soil wetness but high humidity until they root. i kept the pots in it for a week before i potted the cuttings and they felt like they kept the initial moisture they had when they went in.

heres a pic after opening the chamber to let the leaves dry off a little bit:

the three pots on the left are the cuttings, on the right is your water pot on top of a heating rock to promote the humidity factor.

let me know what you think. i love new ideas and combining ideas to make something new.
jaci

my propagation chamber

my propagation chamber


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

This has been so interesting reading. I live in zone 5 along the KS-NEB border and have several annuals that I will try to root in the fall/winter. I have geraniums, begonias, impations, coleous, petunias, and calibraca(sp). Can all of these be put into the progation chamber? Do any of them besides the geraniums need to dry before putting into the chamber? I will move/leave my flower pots inside when the weather is too cold, probably around octotber. When do I take cuttings off and put into the chamber so I can replant them into new pots and be ready to go outsdie in April? I don't want my new plants to become tall and spinly, as we have very strong winds. Can I keep the chamber downstairs where it is fairly cool and dark? Then put the new plants in a warmer, brighter location when started. If I can get this to work, it will save me lots of $ in the spring. Thanks for all the advice. Lola


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Lola, it sounds like you have the right idea.

I have never rooted petunias from cuttings, but I don't know why you couldn't.

You lose nothing by trying.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I wonder: if I planted a cutting from a plant that had root rot in the shoe box would it infect the other plants? The cutting wouldn't have root rot, I'm guessing.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Janie congrats on this post! It has been running for a LONNNNNGGGGG TIME!!! But that just means it is a super fantastic thread! I have been on GW for a while too and have never seen this thread until today! It took me a long time to read EVERYTHING, but I DID! lol, didn't want to miss anything!

I think this was a great idea and I will be trying it myself, I have had some luck with the method medo said she used, but it is really iffy with that one for me. BUT this I think I can do.

persephonita, I think rot root is caused by a bacturium in the soil if I am remembering my reading right. So no it should have an effect on the cuttings you take. Go research root rot to make sure though. I have been reading so much lately it is starting to be confusing.

Thanks again Janie, this was really fun to read, and very much needed info for me!
:) Fran


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Easy Propagation Chamber, needing advice

I have been watching this thread for a long time and I decided to make something very similar and I made two different versions, instead of using a pot in the middle I just used little pots and put the cutting in the soil. I also used small Dixie type cups with holes in the bottom, I cover one of the units with plastic wrap to keep the humidity up and the other one I just used the top that come with it. I was going to post some pictures but I have ran into a little trouble.

The Dixie cups I have used now have some type of fungus growing on the outside of the cup, kind of white in color and kind of clear. I think the chamber is too humdid and causing the cups to start to mold. I have the chamber inside our garage and it does get some sunlight but not at all direct light.

I was trying to grow some cuttings from some shrubs, crap myrtle, and various other plants, and I was trying two different types of rooting hormones to see what does the best.

What should I do about the mold? Toss everything and start over? Try potting them in different containers, take the plants out of the chamber for a while and see if the mold goes away? Or do nothing and see what happens. By the way the cuttings have only been in there since Tuesday night.

Thanks for anyones input.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

If it is growing fungus and/or mold, it isn't going to root, and the mold is not going away.

I would throw it all out, bleach the box and lid, and start over with sterile medium. Also, clean your nippers, pruning shears, and anything else that comes into contact with your cuttings with a 10% bleach solution. I clean mine every time I leave one plant to go to another, so as not to transfer anything.

If I use Dixie cups or styrofoam cups, I put holes around the bottom edge, on the side of the cup. The holes don't get stopped up like the bottom holes do, for some reason, and your cuttings won't stay too wet.

Your cuttings don't need any light at this point, so the garage is a good place for them.

I am sorry about your cuttings. Just start over. I have had to do it a million times. I think everybody does.

Good Luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

this is a WONDERFUL idea, janie! thank you for posting this.

i actually had all of the necessary items around the house, and am about to test it out for myself. i'd love to try to propagate my senecio rowleyanus (string of pearls), but i'm a true novice to propagation. i don't mind trial and error, though!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Is it normal for all the cuttings to look dead?


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Well, hmmmmmmmmm...

I don't know what you are trying to root, or when you took the cuttings, so it is a little hard to answer you.

Did your cuttings have leaves when you stuck them, and they turned brown and crispy after you stuck them? If so, they are probably dead. Are the top ends of your plants dried up and shrivled? If so, they are probably dead.

Also, how long have they been in the chamber?

If they look dead, I would be probably take one up to check it out.

If they are dead, rip them out and start all over. Theres nothing else to do.

Good Luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Yes you described what the cuttings look like. I went out after reading your post and pulled them out. The artic willow also looked dead but it had some roots on it so I tucked it back. Should I bring the willow cutting outside? They are in a shed at the time being and that might be the problem. I may have it to hot in there. What is the temp it should be for the best results. I sure appreciate all your help on this and for sharing with us this chamber. I will say the things I started a month earlier did fine so maybe it just got to hot in the shed.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Well Janie...my thanks to you and all those who have tried your clever idea, and for answering the multitude of questions on this thread.
Because in less than 1 hour I have gained almost 3 years worth of knowledge and expirence gleaned from dozens of people working with your idea.
I took my first cuttings just a few days ago....dipped them in 5-15-5 started/hormone and stuck them in a fine sand over top small gravel. I mist them when I think about, and they stay mostly in the shade. So far so good.
I am looking for all the pieces for a mister/fogger unit to use with a propagation bed, but will also try your clever idea tomorrow. I have dozens of these plastic containers in my shop storing various bits of junk....might as well use them for cuttings!!




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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I absolutely LOVE this thread! Question for you, Janie ... when you do cuttings of the tomato suckers, are they for the current year, or do you do them for the coming year? As I live in Zone 6, I would have to have a greenhouse in order to grow them for the coming year, and I'm not sure if that would even work, as they are so fragile. I'm working on getting a greenhouse anyway, but was wondering if you had any experience regarding this?
NMCynthia


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I just root the suckers of the spring tomatoes to go into the fall garden. We garden year around, and this is a very easy and economical way to get tomato plants.

If I lived where you do, I would grow my tomatoes from seed. They are easy to germinate, and you can have a huge variety of tomatoes. Check out the link.
click on tomato seeds or heirloom tomato seeds.

Good Luck!

Janie

Here is a link that might be useful: Totally Tomatoes


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Thank you for this wonderful idea. I've just had 34 out of 35 clivia seeds germinated by using this propagation chamber. The wonderful thing was that very little effort was put into the project. Besides filling the reservoir every few days, I just had to make sure that the temperature stays within range, that the humidity is high enough and that there is no other unwanted growth. I am now in the process of germinating more clivia seeds (9 of which are from prized specimens), then I want to germinate seeds that I have from other plants. The possibilities is now endless, and I now have six of these chambers.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

  • Posted by liz_h 7/8 DFW Texas (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 3, 08 at 2:46

How much light does the process require? I have some of these boxes with opaque lids. If they would work, it would save me a run into town to get new ones.


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Sorry

  • Posted by liz_h 7/8 DFW Texas (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 3, 08 at 2:48

I apologize for that last post. I didn't take the time to read the entire thread and see that my question was answered. I'll start with my blue lid boxes tomorrow.

ps Once I did post it occurred to me to simply search for the word "opaque" in the thread. Duh!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I have used the larger Rubbermaid containers (about 16 inches deep) for years to root roses in a room in my basment that I have set up for my plants and accessories. My lack of success on many was too much water! Now that I have learned to restrain myself with misting - I don't do it at all most of the time as the lids keep the medium damp. I use the peat cups for roses. This summer I tried some other cuttings for various plants (sages, lantana, celadine poppy, hydrangeas) and it has been very successful! I remove all the leaves except the very top ones and sometimes cut them in half if they are large.

OH, just a comment: once I got very frustrated because some roses were taking so long to root so gave up, turned the lights off, and left them. A couple months later went to throw them away and half of them had rooted!! In the dark and being neglected.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Ok, I just started my chamber. I bought two boxes but just have one started. I put in esperanza, lady banks rose, jasmine, holly bush and coral vine. We'll see how the experiment goes.

About 4 months ago my sister and I found a bamboo grove. We didn't have any tools but pulled some up anyway, actually just broke it off. I realized it was just going to die so I propped it up against the house. About 2 months ago, I needed a stick for something and used that bamboo pole. I then just stuck in a pot where my wisteria is growing and now the bamboo is shooting up from the sides of the stick. The stick is hollow! I pulled it up to see that it had actually grown roots from that old stick. I know its the running bamboo so I'm leaving it in that pot just to watch what happens. My sister couldn't believe it. Accidential propogation!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hello everyone,

Thank you Janie for a wonderful contribution!! I am new to the forums and a bit new to gardening altogether... I have found a bell pepper plant that I just LOVE, but they are a bit expensive and apparantly can't be grown from seed since they are a hybrid.

I have been searching for days on the net for information about propogating bell pepper plants from cuttings and have had absolutely no luck at all.

Is there anyone here that can tell me what the best way to root them would be? I am planning on trying the chamber in an old 10 gallon aquarium with plastic wrap over the top to seal it. I live just north of Dallas TX and it got cold enough to freeze last night... I only took my cutting yesterday and have them in vermiculite right now with a little bit of powdered rooting hormone on the cuttings.

From reading this VERY long and informational post, I have already decided to put the chamber on top of my stand up freezer, since it will provide it with warmth and not too much light, and go to a 50/50 mix of vermiculite and spaghnum peat moss.

Some questions I have that I haven't seen asked are; would a product like superthrive be good or bad to add to the water? Since it will be sealed with plastic wrap like a terrarium, would it be better to let some air in occasionally? And would it be good to keep adding the superthrive to the water if I use it at all?

Any ideas or suggestions for this would be EXTREMELY welcome, since I will likely only get one shot at it this year!

Jimmy


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I'm excited about trying the prop. chamber. It is cold here in W. PA. I think I will have to start with seeds, all my plants have been long ago frozen. But when Spring comes, I'm going to try roses. I wonder how the African Violet cup worked in the camber, as I have several of them. The water leaches through them also. What a fun time I've had reading through all the comments. Thanks Janie.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Using a variation of this method, I now have rooted green and gold euyonmous, gardenias (yes, I know), butterfly bushes, some roses, a blue salvia, pineapple sage, pyracantha, some purple shrub, mandevilla, confederate jasmine, and a lot of other things too. I use rope lighting on a metal shelf for some bottom heat in my basement. Once I see roots, I put a 4' shop light over the containers. I pot everything with roots into small plastic cups and put them in larger containers for a few weeks. Once I'm sure they're well rooted, they'll go out into the cold frame to wait out the winter.

I use plain sand. I've had too much rot on me using soil. The sand allows the water to drain away from the leaves and stay at the bottom. My only problem has been a few gnats. For most plants (except roses), I've had about 90% success.

Thanks for the idea.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I used two unopened bags of miracle grow spagnum moss and perlite to make a medium (50/50). The mold took over pretty bad. I've since found this peat moss molds really bad within 2-3 days after being wet regardless of ventilation. What a bunch of crap.

Anyway, a few months ago I tried to root Rosa Carolina stem cuttings dipped in rooting hormone with zero success.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Sorry you had such rotten luck, midwesternerr.

I have learned to expect some problems, anticipate them even, and be ready for them if they occur. One thing is that I use just plain old peat moss and perlite, as a rule. Sand is very good, and for roses, I like to use something called 'soil conditioner'. I am not sure what it is, exactly, and I can't always find it, but it is larger pieces of materials; nothing dense. It has something to do with improving tilth of the soil. It seems to work very well on roses. I don't use anything that implies that it will feed my cuttings. Miracle Grow spagnum moss is different from plain old peat moss, I would think.

I would urge you to try again. There is nothing like that first success!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hey Jani and others, wanted to let you know I now start my Impatiens from seed this way, and have had great germination.
I tried some begonia cuttings and they preformed well also.
May just go ahead and try soe peppers and mater seeds and see what happens..who knows, maybe I can get rid of my heatmat and propagation chamber set up!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Bumping this back up since it's too good of information to let fall off the forum.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

awesome tutorial, especially the pictures! my grandma can propagate anything, seriously, she has two green hands. thus far I haven't been very successful, but I'm going to try this soon! won't it be fun to impress grandma and let her thing maybe I actually inherited a green thumb after all :)
THANK YOU JANIE!!!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I was just reading some of the posts, since I have not been here in a while, and I noticed that I never did give Jimmy an answer to his pepper question.

I would think you could root pepper cuttings just as you would anything else. Just be sure that you nave a node or two in the rooting medium.

Pepper hybrids can be started from seeds. It is just that they won't always come back true. For example, with an orange, you have a 50/50 chance that it will have good orange fruit. But if you planted every seed you saved from this plant, you are bound to get some good seeds.

As for the Superthrive, I don't think I would use it in the beginning. I don't use any kind of fertilizer or hormones in the rooting chamber. I do like to use it when I transplant my rooted cuttings from the box.

Good Luck!

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

P.S. Be sure to keep the pepper cuttings warm. Peppers don't do anything in cold temps.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hi to all.. as Ive been reading thru here, I havent seen anything about Bougainvillia.. Is it ok to try prop. those in this similar method, and if so, the same way?
Thank you,
Christina


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I have never had good luck propagating bougainvillia, but I have a ws grower friend who propagates a lot of it. I will give them a call and ask about it. He is always very willing to share information.

Janie


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I finally got all of my supplies together. In the mean time I took cuttings and put them in water and have little roots on a few of them - those are going in first! Janie you are an angel for posting over all of these years. May you have many many more years in which to garden!


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Thanks for the tutorial. For me I just use the water bottle that we have around the house. They work just as good as the chamber and it is very resouceful.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hey everyone,

Just want to let everyone know that I'm new to this forum and growing plants. I came across this posting while doing a google search, trying to find info on rooting cuttings from a red/pink(?) dogwood tree. Its a beautiful tree that's about 40yrs old, and would like to clone several so to plant along a fence line. I have some questions that I could not find within this thread of posts.
Will the propagation chamber work for dogwood?

Which is better sand or the peat moss?
Right now its about mid spring. Should I do this indoors?
If rooting does happen, can I transplant this year or wait till next spring.
And finally, will the new little trees grow to flower pink or will they be white?(I ask this because I read that dogwoods have to be made pink by buding or grafting.)

Thanks in advance.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

Hello again,

I posted the question above about dogwood trees.
I wanted apply the same questions to japanese maple trees.
with one more question to include.

After cutting, how long do I have before the cuttings go bad?

I have a friend that has the japanese maple and he says I can have some cuttings. he lives a couple hours away from me.


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RE: Easy Propagation Chamber

I have read all the posts(lots of them!) and think I am ready to start a prop. chamber. I will try passion vine and Alice duPont mandevilla. Great information. Thanks.


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