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How to save a potted gift rose

Posted by fleursuzie z8 mid ga (My Page) on
Sun, Apr 4, 04 at 11:05

Although I do not profess to being any type of expert on miniature roses, I find the pretense of having "toss away" roses obscene. That is what some people have called them here on the mini rose forum.

These potted gift roses (also known as grocery store roses) can easily be saved with very little effort.

Things you will need:
A large mixing bowl or bucket
One 6" pot per plant or two 12" pots
Potting soil it can have slow release fertilizer but NO water crystals

What to do:
1. Fill bowl or bucket with enough water to cover all the roots of the plants
2. Remove rose from pot and place in bowl, let sit for a few minutes
3. slowly "swish" the rose plants back and forth to loosen as much dirt as possible from the roots
4. When you have gotten as much soil off as possible, slowly start pulling the plants apart. Be very gentle so as to break as few roots as possible. The best way is to jiggle the roots around until one of the plants starts tilting. Then slowly pry the roots apart. It helps to return to water every now and then to swish the roots around again. (Note: dont worry if you loose some of the roots...there really isnt a way to avoid it from happening, especially if there is a strong network of roots growing)
5. When plants are separated, plant one each in a pot or alternatively, several around the perimeter of a larger pot.
6. Water pots and place in a well lit place but out of direct sunlight for a few days.

Notes:
Soil Use regular, good quality, potting soil. It is ok if it has slow release fertilizer, but no fertilizer is better. Do NOT use soil with water retention crystals. (Although peat moss is ok)

If the plants are waterlogged (the soil from the original pot is soggy and boggy, the leaves are all turning yellow, etc) it is best to withhold water for the first 12 to 24 hours after replanting (this gives the roots a chance to dry out a little and excess moisture will be leached into the new dry soil). After that time, water well to make sure that there are no air pockets from when you potted up. ( note: this is after you have put the rose in its new pot, you can still use the bucket of water to separate them)

Keep the newly potted roses out of direct sun for a couple of days. After that, acclimate it to direct sunlight.

Once the rose is established (about 2-4 weeks after repotting) start fertilizing. You can tell if it has established itself when new growth starts forming


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Great advice-thanks for sharing.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thanks, this looks like a good method to divide them, as they are own roots. I've had good luck potting mine up in 12" pots with my "other" minis, and they are huge this year.

Do you repot after they've bloomed, when you prune yours? or is anytime ok?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

hi suzanne,

can i ask how long after repotting will the plants come up with buds?.....

when i first bought mine, there were quite a bit of buds, however, because the stems behind the buds turned brown, i had to cut them off.

thanks to u, there are lots of new leaves and shoots!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

WOW! This is a fantastic response to a commonly asked question! I came over to this forum to specifically ask how to save my "grocery store mini" and I was able to get everything I needed from your post. Thank you so much!

I was surprised to see that this forum doesn't have an FAQ section. If it did, this post would be an essential entry! Great job and thanks again!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Everyone who is new to mini's should read this.
Thank you so much fleursuzie.
Foxy.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

hi fleur, this is a real useful tip, i have been using it to separate all kinds of plants....thanks!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Oh....now not sure what I should do. I have already repotted mine into a 1 gallon pot about 1 month ago- did not realize til looking at them after reading this post that I actually have 4 plants, not just one. Should I go ahead and repot into separate pots, or let them stay where they are for awhile? They are just starting to get new leaves, etc.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I'd leave them alone until they need repotting again. You can separate them at that time just as easily, so why disturb them now that they've just gotten settled?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi Guys...
Wow, I am really glad my post got the response that it did. I am sorry to those that asked questions...I have been away for a few weeks and didn't see all the posts until tonight.

First to psa146, I agree with mainesfwriter, if they are looking fine, leave them alone. If they are looking sickly..then you might need to do it. But being in AZ, you would need to be especially careful. I am sure it is hotter there right now than it is here in mid Georgia...we are getting mid 90's. If you do end up having to do it...I would strongly suggest either keeping them indoors for a week (in a high light area...sunny window with 4 hours sun would be great)...or at least keep them shaded and cool as you can if you have to have them outdoors until they have acclimated.

Like I said before, this is ONLY if they are looking sickly and you feel that it really needs to be done. If they appear to be thriving, leave them alone. You can separate in late winter or early spring before new growth starts.

To Dolce Vita... I am definitely the wrong person to ask about pruning...I usually just cut back to the first 5-leaf stem after the bloom is spent. Yes, I know, pruning is alot more detailed, but I always end up butchering things when I try to prune them (lol, just as my neighbors about my hedge!)
There is another thread on this board about pruning. I will add the link to it.
About when to pot up, do you mean initially when you first get them? In that instance, I usually allow them to bloom, then repot - UNLESS they are looking bad - in that case, I would repot immediately. For regular potting up of established plants, I wait until they go dormant (or in my case, close to dormant...mine don't loose all their leaves because it doesn't get cold enough here). If they get to where they are excessively root bound, then I will pot up regardless of the time of year.

To Small Bottle... you should have some blooms by now. Let me know how they did!

Sorry guys, didn't mean to make such a long post.

Suzanne

Here is a link that might be useful: Pruning Miniatures


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi, thanks so mcuh for the advice...have been looking for that answer everyhere. Managed to find this forum on Blinkx.com-it's this new search engine thing. Thanks again.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thanks, mainesfwriter and fleursuzie. 2 seem to be doing great, and the other 2 are coming along, so will leave them alone at least til fall.

I'm so glad I found this forum!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I too came here for mini advice. I just got mine on sale at P&C. It has a lot of buds(two are opening now) and I wondered about planting it outside. Should I do it now and seperate them (seems to be four in the pot) or plant out the whole group all together? Thanks for this and any further advice anyone can give me.
.....Liz


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi Liz,

For right now, enjoy your roses until the buds that are there now have finished blooming (probably in the next week or two). Then separate and plant them out. You might have a little new growth or some small buds emerging, but that is ok, they will recover.

You want to separate them because as they grow, they will become overcrowded if left like they are now. And as with most plants, the strong will survive and the weaker ones will either die or won't flourish.

Once separated, they will look tiny, but they will grow quickly. A couple of weeks after you transplant them, you will start seeing new growth, and after a few more weeks, blooms.

If you are planting them into the ground, be very careful not to let the sun kill them. If you can, place something around them to block the sun until they have acclimated. Light colored pots work well for this...potted plants, even better (well, they look nicer at least). I have even gone so far as to take 4 sticks and a piece of white cloth to make a little canopy to shade it from the sun (it was in the middle of summer...to say the least, my neighbors thought I was nuts...but hey, it worked!)The main thing is to allow them to acclimate to their new surroundings before letting the sun beat down on them relentlessly.

Hope this helps,

Suzanne


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Fleursuzie--

I read your initial post just after Easter when my mom gave me a potted gift rose. I had no idea what to do with it, but I followed your advice to a T, and I was sad to watch all the blooms and buds wilt and die only days after I repotted. The plant turned yellow and got droopy, but I realized I was probably overwatering, so I left it alone for about a week. Slowly the plant started to revive, and I'm happy to report that this morning I've spotted 3 or 4 new buds on the rose! I'm so excited!

Thanks so much for your invaluable instructions, Fleursuzie! My advice to any newbies out there is this: Don't lose heart if the rose doesn't bounce back immediately--just be patient and let nature run it's course!

Cheers,
Heidi


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I think this post is so helpfull it should stay on the first page.
Foxy.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Ok, after you have the roses separated, they will be like bareroot, right? Would I plant them into new pots like a regular bareroot, with mound to hold spread out roots, or do I just stick them in the pots like they are and fill with soil?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Actually, a little of both.

Remember, they are not dormant like most bare roots are when you plant them. There will be alot of roots...some of them long. Also since they are young (probably no older than 6 months) the thick woodsy type roots are just starting to develop. you want to put dirt in the bottom, and it wouldn't hurt to spread the roots out as much as you can, but you won't need to do the "lets build a cone" thing. (sorry, that is how I used to explain it to my son, LOL) or if you do build a mound, it won't have to be a big one, just a little bit up in the center.

Actually, what I do is like what I said above, but when I water it, I get it really good and wet and wiggle the plant around and up and down a little to make sure that there aren't any air bubbles stuck around the roots. I usually do it twice, each time while it is so full of water that the plant is actually floating in the water/mud.

Hope this helps.

Suzanne


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Yes, that clarifies things, thanks so much!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Bump.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I bought a pot of yellow mini roses last October from Safeway. I separated the plants right away and planted them outdoors in a raised mini bed. They grew much taller and fuller this spring and are just finishing their first flush. The blooms are great - they look just like a miniature version of The Pilgrim! Unfortunately, being supermarket minis they have no name and cannot be shown.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by Janet 5 SE MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 9, 04 at 17:10

THis is exactly what I was looking for! DH came home on Valentine's Day with a mini red rose. It was gorgeous but I told him not to feel bad if it died, these rarely make it. Well it bloomed for 6 weeks and started to decline. I thought here it goes! I used a dilute fertilizer and trimmed back yellow as it happened. It perked up and had another flush of flowers! When it warmed up this spring I repotted it and have it outside on the deck where it's blooming again.

My question is should I put it in the ground or keep it as a pot plant indoors this winter? I have very bright south exposure windows for it.

DH is of course very smug about the whole thing. He thinks he picked the perfect plant and that I can grow anything. I think it's all luck!

Thanks!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I recently posted about issues with my little rose.

I don't have any potting soil right now... but would coco coir or a mix of that and vermiculite be good as a substitute for this?

Thanks so much!!!

Sara


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Will over watering and letting the rose sit in water make the leaves dry up and the plant die? Over the last 2 weeks, I have seen this 2 times at work. One rose that I am trying to rescue from a secretary might be too far gone. I watched the rose dry up and think I waited too long to ask her if I could try to save it.
The other one was just yesterday. I walked into a co-workers office for a meetng and spotted a wilted rose from across the room. This one had some leaves dried up, the buds were wilted but the stems are green. The pot was completely submerged in water for at least 7 days. So I am going to try to rescue it.
What causes roses to do this? It is the submersion in water that causes fungus and then causes them to die?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

bumping this back to the top because it is such a good post....this forum really needs a faq!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

this is exactly why i came here too! I was looking for the faq and ?? well good job!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I potted up my store bought mini today using the technique seen here.They look happy,but I may have to bring them inside for tonight(low temps)I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
Eliza Ann


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by janw az9b (My Page) on
    Sat, May 7, 05 at 20:06

I have two that I planted right from the pots and they are great one is 2 years planted the other about 6 months
I do the same to them that I do to my 20 other roses


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I have just bought my first miniature rose plant. They are blooming now. They came 4 in a 4" pot. My question is, can I repot them now, or should I wait? Also they have a few stems that are brown, should I cut them off at the base of the plant? I'm not sure how to do anything yet. Can anyone help me?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Is this a single rose plant? or multiple plants in a single pot?

You can usually tell the difference by looking at the soil line...are there several stems coming out of the dirt, or just one? Another hint is where you bought it from...If it was a florist, grocery store, or walmart type place...it is probably multiple plants. If you bought it mail order from an nursery or rose supplier, it is probably a single plant. Another tip...if it was covered in blooms...it is multiple plants :-)

If it is multiple plants, try the suggestion listed at the begining of this thread. However, I am now suggesting that a larger pot be used. Instead of using a 6 inch pot, use a 8, 10, or 12 inch pot (this will save you having to pot up at the end of the season, or the beginning of next season)...however is your space is very limited at this point, you can probably get away with the 6 inch pots.

Either way, you can probably wait until the blooms are spent, unless the plant(s) itself starts looking ill. The reason I say this is that there is a good chance you will loose your blooms after you re-pot...they will, of course, bound back in several weeks.

If it is a single plant, you can probably pot up now...you may possibly loose your blooms, however it "should" rebound quicker as it will more than likely have a healthier root system.

In regards to the brown stems...are they brittle, or mushy? You mentioned the base of the plant...is it brown all the way down to the bottom? (I am just trying to determine if this is normal die-off of a stem - which ocurs from time to time - or if there is a problem with root-rot or another disease)

If it is brittle, just cut it back to the green area (if it is both green and brown on the same stem).

Good luck, and welcome to the world of minature roses!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you so much fleur. Can I ask how long you have been growing mini roses? You know so much about them. I am so grateful to have found your information. Thanks again.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

My two cents re: separating or leaving them as is..I never separate them, instead I put them into a huge pot and/or the ground with alot of space and I have had them all thrive and turn into huge bushes. My biggest one I have had for 4 years, it's huge, and none of the 4 plants ever died off.

Just wanted to chime in re: positive press if you wanted to keep them all together. Good luck!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

This post was very helpful. My daughter bought me a miniature rose in a small pot last summer. It did great just sitting on my front steps even through the winter. This spring however it looked like it was dying. I kept watering it and adding miracle grow and it is flourishing now only no flowers. It seems to be two plants. I have considered planting it in the yard. One in with my lillies and the other I haven't decided on yet. Any suggestions on helping it survive. The lillies are in full sun most of the day. I thought about sitting the pot among the lillies before planting so the rose can get used to that location first. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by jpw_chi 5b Chicago, IL (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 10, 05 at 16:22

Any tips on powdery mildew? I've done really well with repotting them and getting them to grow like gangbusters. . . only to defoliate with PM. Eventually I threw in the towel.

Since these were indoors plants in a poorly ventilated area, the less pesticide involved the better. Thanks.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

The "indoor plants in a poorly ventilated area" is the problem. You can try the Cornell formula (or the modified version), but they really need to be grown outside.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi, i got bought a mini rose a few weeks ago. I already repotted it into a 8" container but i never did seperate the roots by the method above. Almost all the leaves on my mini are now turing yellow. Would anyone have any advice? I'm not sure if i am over watering or underwatering?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi Lynn, I am no expert but yellow leaves especially if the veins are yellowing first is a sign of over-watering. Someone will correct me here if I'm wrong. What kind of soil did you use? I have been so far very succesful with Miracle Gro moisture control mixed two trowel full of orchid mix (Better Gro) for good drainage.
My watering is also weird according to my husband. I have a bucket that I fill with water about 1/4 full then I submerge the whole pot in it, when the top soil is wet, then I take the pot out and do it again in 3-4 days. It keeps the foliage from getting wet and I know the soil is thoroughly soaked that way.

Hope that helps.

msjam


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

thanks msjam, the soil that i am using is black gold. A garden center said that it would do well for roses since it contains perlite, earthworm castings and peatmoss among other things. I was wondering also how long have you been watering your roses this way?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I've been watering like this for at least 6 weeks now, the first two weeks that I got my roses, I water them the "normal" way and my roses have yellow leaves and they keep falling off.

Goodluck.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Putting this lovely thread back up top as there are tons of Gift Roses out there these days :-) I bought a yellow Parade, the printed name on the pot is Mistral, but it has no scent and according to the site it's supposed to. Then the other rose I got that was a parade is in bloom again, and now it has a scent, but the name on the pot was Karina...however that one isn't supposed to have a scent! I wonder if they have problems labeling roses at their nurseries...this one is a local grower...they use neat computers to label the pots though! I'm pleased with the roses from Poulsen amazingly enough. I also have some from Nor'East that are coming back after a hard, wet winter. I hope they come back strong :-) I feel terrible that I can't put them right in the ground.

minibot


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I already planted my minis in the ground a few months ago, but didn't separate them. They are doing well, but they are crowded and thick. I didn't realize they were separate plants until I read this post. My question is, should I take them out and separate them or leave them? Do it later? ???? Thanks for any help!

Swarmina


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Swarmina, they might or might not be separate plants. It might be just one really healthy plant. You won't know for sure unless you dig it out and see. But, if it is healthy, I wouldn't bother it at all. You can thin it out by cutting out a few canes from the inside of the plant.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Oh how happy I am to find this thread!

I just moved into a "Garden Home" (from a 200+ acre farm) and am struggling to landscape it. It seems that the only way is to scale everything back to small and I impulsively purchased a bunch of grocery store miniature roses. At the farm I've had great luck with them - just dig a hole by a water trough and cram the whole bunch into it. Voila! They grow and bloom like mad.

Here, the soil is yukky and the yard is tiny and so I'm pretty much growing everything in containers. I didn't want to lose or "throw away" these beautiful little roses and had no idea how to pot them up until I read this thread. They are doing great and putting on new growth so I think they're all going to make it. I am one happy camper!

Thanks to all for the wonderful aid and input.

Mary


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

For new folks who received potted minis for V-Day or for those who couldn't resist the temptation at the Box Box stores, this thread has good information on how to save your plant until you can get it outside.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I'm really glad to see this thread still alive!

I received another gift rose this valentines day. Unfortunately, it didn't make it. I had planned on waiting a week to let the blooms open well (they never did). I saw the plant(s) were in distress and planned on doing the transplant the next day. But my daughter came down with a stomach flu (which we all ended up with) and by the time I was well enough to attend to it, it was all shriveled and black. I'm still going to rinse off the roots and set it out (but not bother with separating) to see if one or two come back.

Anyway...., getting back to my actual reason for this post....
I just wanted to say that I always separate out my plants....but I do it so that I will have more plants. But it IS NOT mandatory.

I DO believe it is healthier for them to be separated...but that is my personal opinion. There are others here that do well by plunking them down in the ground (soil and all). I just never have that much luck...I guess my thumb isn't naturally green...so I have to work a little harder at it. :-(

Peace to all....
and keep the thread rolling. ;-)


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by nova z9 Ocklawaha (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 3, 07 at 7:22

Just wanted to thank you for this wonderful posting! I separated 3 pots of minis about a week ago according to the directions here and out of the 15 individual plants I got 12 are thriving and putting out new growth. I was leery of doing it but reading thru this thread gave me the confidence to go for it. Thank you again and know that my garden will be a "rosier" place this year thanks to your wonderful advise!

nova


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I just picked up a Cinderella Kordana at the grocery store and I think this answered my question! I have what looks like 7 individual plants in one 6 inch pot. Each one has either a single cane or 2 canes coming down to a "v" point at the soil. A photo of the canes are on my Yahoo photo album at the following link:
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/priszm78/detail?.dir=780are2&.dnm=4d2cre2.jpg


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Wonderful information! I just joined this forum today, specifically looking for information on a mini parade rose (named charming)that i was given for valentine's day. Thanks so much! I can't wait to transplant and grow my first ever mini rose!!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Welcome to you, Megviolet:) Minis are a lot of fun to grow. It's a struggle to try to keep one alive inside however, but some do from the posts here. Apparently you've run searches on this already...Minis are also addicting....
Good luck,
Leslie


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I was glad to see this post because I've never been able to keep a mass-market rose alive. Remembering it, this afternoon I bought an 8" pot of yellow roses on sale at the grocery store. Hours later, I have repotted them as 16 plants from four palpable rootballs. I paid less than $1 apiece for them, the same total as I paid for a Hot Tamale standard. It looked like someone shoehorned four 4" pots into one 8" and scattered a little potting soil on top.

If they are Parade roses, as seems likely, then I believe that 11 of them are Sonja (butter yellow with dark pink/red margins) and one is either Parade Yellow or Mistral. The other four have no blossoms, though two have buds. They all look healthy. I don't suppose they'll all survive, but I'm hoping for a few at least to put in the ground next year.

Thank you for posting this!

Anne


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I am happy to have found this forum!! I bought a mini rose plant a few weeks ago and so far one yellow rose bud has bloomed beautifully! A few other buds fell off when I was moving the plant, and some others have black stems now. My question is about the white fuzz on the leaves. I saw another post above mention this too, but what exactly is this white fuzz? Should it be removed? Thanks!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I'm glad I found this great post!
I all of my roses are store bought minis. With that said I would like to say that I just cut my roses apart with scissors. Ok after you stop cringing the reason I posted this is because I want people to know that minis can take quite a beating and bounce back when you are separating them in the bucket.
When I first started planting my minis I did it with water in a bucket. But now I just cut them down the middle (and once again down the middle if there are four). I have lost 3 roses out of about 20. It makes me sad, but I when I started getting the minis I just couldn't stand pulling at the roots. I felt like I was killing it. haha No Kidding!
Anyway Great Information.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Although I don't have any mini's at the moment, I have had a number of them over the years and always had the same result.....a fairly quick death. :( In the spring when they are on the local shelves again, I'll get a couple at Home Depot and give them a try...again. This time I'll use some of the tips on this thread and hopefully I'll have better luck.
However, someone asked a question part the way through the thread and I didn't see an answer....
Is it better to leave the potted mini's outside during the winter in the pots or is it better to bring them inside to winter over? I can't put them into the ground because I live in a condo now. But I do have a screened in porch that gets lots of sun. It faces pretty much to the west.
Thanks for any information any of you can give!
Linda


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by ecosse 8a/11sunset/SNevada (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 27, 07 at 22:26

Hi shenue

I am still at a beginners' stage myself, but thanks to a lot of help earlier in the year, I may be able to give you a direction to head for (and will happily accept being over-ruled!)

There is a great post addressing your issue "survive winter in zone 6a" (link below). Your winter is not likely to be as harsh, but when you get to the point of freezing, double potting/boxing as described would be good. Many of the supermarket roses are from Poulsen, which were developed in Denmark. Once they have regained their health after being "forced", they can be tough cookies. That being said, a container doesn't give the roots the protection from heat and cold extremes that being in the earth does. (I learned that the hard way after "stewing" mine in 114 heat).

To go along with the original subject, I accidentally discovered that the minis I had potted up for a couple of months without separating handled the separating process very well, due to having grown healthy roots.

Of course you'll want to cut back on feeding etc as cold weather gets close-don't want tender new growth to freeze. Here we also stop before deep summer as well-don't want to fry 'em

Good Luck!

Here is a link that might be useful: Over-winter potted minis


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi ecosse. Thanks for the additional hints. I can use all that I can get for my next try at the little mini bushes!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I sincerely wish I had seen this post a month ago...I already repotted mine and never separated or swished the roots with water, ect. I've been having a rough time keeping mine alive, but hasn't died yet! Doesn't help that it's indoors for now until spring, if it lives. Oh well, this is great information if I ever get another one anyway!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Here I am again...after Valentine's day 2008 with more "leftover" mini potted roses. I didn't wait for them to stop blooming - I just brought them home and followed the instructions which have worked so well before. I am happy to report that my tiny little yard is absolutely bursting with color from my rescued mini roses. I just wanted to say thanks again and to update. All the roses I repotted in 2006 have survived and thrived (I actually had to prune the little buggers back hard because they were starting to take over.) Every day during the summer I have new surprises. Thanks to you all for your encouragement and instruction!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

My grocery store roses from over four years ago are still growing fine outdoors, and we've just been through a very cold winter. They survived the late freeze last year, then 40 days of rain, then our typical summer heat. I love it when stores put these plants on clearance after holidays--I've bought pots with 7 plants in them for $1.
I put some of them in planters and some in the ground, and so far, they have all made it. One store had 8 pots all with red and white stripes (Jolly Cupido, I think) so I bought them all (a dollar apiece!) and split them all up and made a mini-hedge in the front of a flower bed with red and white striped zinnias and petunias. I see all those are leafing out now. I bought them in June or July and each skinny little stick grew into a bona fide rose bush by fall. Rebloom was excellent! The Poulsen roses are even better for me, so I would encourage people in zone 6 to go ahead and rescue every gift rose they can. Mine are happy whether in a planter with other flowers, by themselves, or in the ground. I just make sure they get good air movement and don't dry out before I get them planted.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hello, everyone! This is a great thread. I've got two minis that I've been keeping alive indoors since maybe early January. They have both put on new growth, but I'm having difficulty with the larger one getting spider mites. I know that spraying it from beneath is the answer, but it's too big to do this to in my sink, and the plant is starting to decline.
So, my question is, when can I plant these guys outside? Our "safe to plant" date is usually Mother's Day, so doing it next weekend would be 5 weeks early. I really don't care if the leaves die, as long as the roots live. I've also been trying to acclimate them to outdoors - yesterday they had some lovely sun and then got snowed on, and don't seem worse for wear.

Thoughts, please!

Lara


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I just discovered this thread this AM - two years ago I "Rescued" two pots of the postValentine's Day blizzard overstock at Price Chopper. I successfully repotted most of the 8 - and if I had done the pot of water root-swish I bet I would have had them all. By May they were in great shape, and most of them went to the library plant sale. The two I kept rebloomed off and on all summer, and are wintering in their pot with the rest of the potdwellers, in a ditch full of leaves in back of the house. I hope to see them rsurrected/1


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hello everyone. I was so glad to have found this thread last year. As I said in my last October post, I've tried for years to grow these tiny rose bushes, but with no luck. I was going to get one when the Mother's Day bunch hit the stores this year and try again, using all the good information here. However my daughter beat me to it by giving us a beautiful little mini last night for our anniversary. It is named "Katrina". It has lovely little red roses. It came from a fairly large garden center in the area called Homewood Gardens. It is in a 4" plastic pot and has at least 5 separate bushes in it. Sometime in the next few days, I'm goin to repot it, probably using a large pot and spacing them around the pot. I was trying to read through all these posts and the one thing I didn't see was what kind of pot is best to use for them. Such as plastic vs. terra cotta....etc. Does anyone have any thoughts about this? I want SO much for these little guys to make it. As I stated in my post from last year, I live in a condo now so planting them in the ground is out of the question. We have a screened in porch that gets lots of direct afternoon sunlight, but also towards the back of the porch, plants can be put in a partial sun/shade situation. I'm going to read the link that ecosse so kindly posted last Nov. for me to see about wintering them over (if they make it that long---keeping my fingers crossed). As a general rule is it better to let them winter over outside in the pots..double potting..etc, or do some of you find it better to bring them inside during the winter. Any and all advice will be very appreciated!
Thanks!

Linda


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose..spider mites

lilgreenfrog.........

Can you simply use a spray bottle with water in it to spray under the leaves of your rose bush? That's what I use on my elephant ears and it works quite well. I hope you win in your battle against those little critters. Battling them on elephant ears is fairly easy because of the large leaves. I'm not well versed, at all, about battling them on mini roses. Good luck!!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose--oops

oops...I mis-stated the name of the tiny rosebush that was given to me last night. It is "Karina"...not "Katrina".


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I received a gift of a potted Kordana rose a week ago and someone kindly pointed me to this post.

So, a few questions. I'm planning to plant it outside in my cottage garden. I've already been hardening the plant(s?) for a week. I'm figuring on teasing the plants apart as described above. Any thoughts on how far apart each plant should be?

What type of soil do they like? My soil is medium clay, so I normally amend it depending on what I'm planting. Anything special I need to do when planting? (I am a rose newbie).

How about rose food? When do I feed and how often? What strength? I don't like miracle grow. I try to use organic fertilizers whenever possible.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hello a2zmom
How far apart to plant your miniatures depends on the type of the minis. Not knowing for sure which types they are, I suggest to plant them 2 to 2 1/2 feet apart. That will allow for good air circulation and for you to get around the little plants to prune.

Minis are like regular roses... Soil pH about 6 or 7 range, and they like loamy soil, rich with humus. Also adding nutrition by using organic matter (compost or manure) helps keep the water moist and will fertilize naturally. Most important about the soil is good drainage.

I live with a LOT of pine trees, so adding dolomitic limestone is good for my area. Opposite? Add sulfur.

Hope I was helpful. Google or Yahoo are very good resources, and so are some gardening blogs.

Enjoy and good luck!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

While I was recovering from surgery this winter I came across this post and in April spotted some tiny 4" pots of roses at Wal-Mart. Bought 1 pink and 1 white pot $1.99 ea. Got them home and separated them into 2 litre pots even though they were in full bloom. They sulked for awhile, then started putting out new growth. Put the pots outside plunged into the garden. They have since put out new flowers. This white one has 3 new flowers 2 1/2 inches in diameter. No name on the tag... just that it is hardy from zones 5-9. The white ones seem to be growing faster than the pinks at this time. Here's a pic of one now. I like the touch of pink in the centre.

Photobucket


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I've done this before too except I planted them directly outdoors in the flower bed 10 years ago. They are still growing and blooming!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Pushing up the thread because there are a few new people who have purchased "gift" roses and this might help.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I just received a planted mini as a gift and realized it was dying (like every other indoor plant I have ever received). I am hoping with all the info I found here I can save this one. Thanks!!!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

If i can't repot the roses, at least for a month or so, what can i do to help them??


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I don't know if anybody is still responding to this thread (i posted the above over 3 months ago), but I'd like to thank everyone who's posted advice on here, it's been invaluable; I received potted roses for valentines, and I really wanted to keep them alive as it's the first time that i've had flowers on valentines day so it'd be cool if they lasted a year. By the time i got home from uni to repot them, one of 5 in the pot had already died but i saved the other,s which i was convinced that i'd kill as i'm awful with plants! For the most part, they're now doing really really well, although a bid that was just starting to open has gone all limp and sorry for itself on one plant - could this be under-watering? If anybody is still reading this, I'd love an answer, but otherwise, thank you for all the info!!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

push up, good thread


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I just got my rose about 3 weeks ago, now the leaves are turning brown around the edges and falling off at the slightest touch, and the outer layer of the buds are turning brown before it ever even gets to bloom. I have started pulling the outer layer off, they do not put up any resistance at all. I did have it indoors sitting in the window but moved it outside when I saw what was happening. I keep it watered as the directions say. What am i doing wrong? I used to say I had a green thumb and could grow anything....Now It seems my green thumb is BROWN! How can I save it?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I left my valentine minis in the ground and mulched them heavily. Success ranged from no visible damage to dead. Most have some canes that need to be pruned. That's about one out of eight. I think hardiness is related to colour.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I love the tips and tricks here but I haven't had any luck with mini roses. I had some sent to me for Mother's Day and they all died off.
I bought some from Walmart and several grocery stores and they ended up dying.
I ammended regular potting soil with some vermaculite and bone meal. The leaves turn yellow and get spots on them. I have sprayed the leaves with organic aids to kill the problems but then the actual stems turn black at the tips. I have tried to prune that off (with clean shears) and they end up turning completely black and hard.
I just repotted last nite and hopefully I can save these plants or I will have to order some from an online source because I want to plant some in our front yard because we have limited space and they will fit nicely.
Does anyone have any tips for the black tips issue?
And does anyone have any online sources to buy minis?
Thanks :)


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I knew I'd find my answer somewhere on Gardenweb; almost always do. Got a pot with 4 pretty little red roses for Valentine's, and wasn't sure whether it'd be best to plant them outside in one bunch or separate them. What I will do now is separate them into 4 pots, then once they are growing well, and weather permitting, I'll plant them in the ground. Thanks, guys, for all the useful info.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi fleursuzie, I need a little bit of help with my potted mini rose. I sent you an email, and I'm uncertain of how to post a picture on this forum.

The mini roses came in a 4 inch pot and were in a very small hanging basket for a short amount of time. I took them out of the basket when I noticed the buds, flowers, and leaves starting to wilt and shrivel up.

The soil it came in had started to dry out on the surface, so when I noticed this and the shriveling leaves, I watered the roses.

When this made little difference to the condition of the roses, I re-potted them into a 6 inch pot (in a soil mixture of regular potting soil and peat moss, with a tiny bit of root growth stimulator added) and placed them outside where they could get a bit more light.

This did not seem to help, as the leaves continued to die back and shrivel, and.. eventually fall off.

Just today, I found your thread and re-potted them into an 11inch hanging basket in nothing but peat moss. I unfortunately cut back a bit of the stems, because they were starting to shrivel and die back too.

Is there any hope for these roses? They look like 3-4inch long leafless sticks pointing out of the top of their pot.

I'll be quite sad if I lose them, as I bought them as a gift for my mother.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

So I received a mini rose as a gift from my husband last year, I kept it alive and well until aphids got the best of it, and I gave up. He recently bought me three more, planted in a larger pot and brought them home, knowing that I loved the first one. This was two weeks ago. Within the first few days I could see that one of the plants (given they were all different colors) was not doing well. The leaves were wilting and the blooms were dying (especially before opening... they would fold over and get about an inch, inch and half of black under the bloom). I have read and read on this, and have found no real explanation. I did what I thought was best today, and cut the blooms off (like I do my bigger bushes outside - right about 5 leaves) and the stems and leaves that were dying. The leaves that wilted fell off easily, but there are healthy leaves too. There were healthy blooms also. I am waiting to see if it does any good and if it doesn't I plan on trying to re-pot them, giving them new soil. It was bought at a greenhouse however the greenhouse ordered it specially for my husband since they aren't "in season" from a third party. So I am not sure if perhaps they got it from someplace that may have had disease or pests running rampant.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

This was fantastic advice. I've wanted to say this for a while, but was not a member of the forum...

I bought a mini-rose plant around April (2011) to make my room more festive for spring (since the snow outside wasn't giving me any hope). I was really sad to see it turning brown after a month. Having had most of my other plants that I started from seed indoors die (long cold season and I'm new at this...), I had no hope in saving these roses, but decided to try anyways.

I cut all the brown stems off, all the way to the green that was still left. They looked like tiny little green sticks sticking out of the pot by the time I was done! From there I followed the steps fleursuzie provided. In one pot I had 6 individual plants! That's ridiculous. No wonder the roses were suffering in that tiny pot.

I planted them outside once it was consistently warm enough outside.

By the beginning of July, each plant grew double the size of what they looked like together when they were first bought. They started budding by the end of July, and at the beginning of August started to flower continuously until mid October.

Just before snow hit, I noticed some orange things at the back of the leaves. I googled them, and figured they looked like aphids. I didn't get a chance to get rid of them before it got super cold outside, so first thing when it warms up here, i'm going to get right at them, and also plant some mint nearby. I hear aphids hate the smell of mint.

Thank you for the advice!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6 MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Jan 26, 12 at 0:18

Congratulations! It sound like you did everything right and the roses are happy!

If your orange things were aphids they'll have died off over winter. But they don't sound like aphids to me. Most aphids attack the new growth at the tips not the back of the leaves. I'm not sure what you have but don't spray anything for insects unless you actually see them on the plant and can identify them. Not all sprays work on all bugs. Most sprays work on contact only so if you don't have insects already on the roses spraying will not prevent you from getting them.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Although aphids tend to be a problem on roses, it could also be spider mites (which sometimes tend to look reddish).

Make sure to get up all leaves on the ground around the bush(es) where eggs may be.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I should have stated that they were both on the back of leaves and the back of the roses. There didn't seem to be any damage to my roses. I guess I will have to wait until the spring to be sure they are still around (and if my roses survived this winter). I'll try to take a picture of them if they are back. They looked too big to be spider mites. My moms potted petunias on the balcony in the front of the house had them. I got rid of them easily with a 1:1 ration of rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. The alcohol evaporates quickly and does not harm the plant, but kills the spider mites. There were no webs on the roses though when I spotted the orange little critters.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by jenn SoCal 9/19 (My Page) on
    Fri, Jan 27, 12 at 23:01

Thank you for starting this! I often see these little potted roses at Trader Joe's, want to get one, and then think they're not meant to last. How sad! Now that I know what to do with them, I am sure that one will leap into my cart next time I'm there.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

It is the day after Valentines Day, so I thought I'd bump this thread. I impulsively bought a little 4" pot of red mini roses for my fiance, thinking they'd be longer lived and a little less generic than cut roses. Now that it falls to me to keep them alive. I've read this entire thread, and I have a couple of zone and season specific questions. Can I plant these in the ground in Zone 5a, or do I need to keep them in a pot that I can move to a sheltered location in the winter? (I have a glassed in porch where I keep my bonsai) Secondly, it is the middle of february, and these roses are blooming. Is it too late for them to enter a dormant period? Should separate and pot them up and move them outside in the spring, or should I move them to the porch to have a short cold season? My preference would be to plant them in the landscaping at the front (east-southeast) of the house, but I don't want to have to cover them.

I've never grown roses before, and am generally more knowledgeable about trees when it comes to dormancy/seasonal treatment, and even that I am a novice in. Any advice would be appreciated.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you for this entire post I purchased two mirco mini rose bushes today.. A beautiful red (the color of Opening Night) and a sweet pink (the color of Falling in Love,buds are about 3/4" and the roses are very double...

I was worried about the soaking wet soil--I pulled the entire plant and rootball out of the pots and let them sit for several hours today.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I purchased two white mini roses that were on the "shelf for the dying" at a local market. I am newly attracted to these plants so went looking for advice. (Completely new to forums also.) In reading everybody's posts I've become scared & stymied. It seems I may have several singular roses within the two pots. Didn't know that so potted them from their 3 in. plastic pots to 8 in. clay pots. I thought roses mildewed easily, but it sounds like these need lots of water? Can I leave them planted together for now? If I didn't, they would be merely sticks as they were near death and losing leaves. Also, they've been planted for one week now with only the initial watering (until they dripped.) Should I water again? Thank you for any advice. I'm excited to make this work! Zone 7, Oregon.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Apr 1, 12 at 21:08

You can leave them planted together permanently and it won't hurt them one bit. I tried separating them several times with no luck. The ones I've left alone and just planted have all survived. Do you have your roses inside or outside? Roses do not like to be indoors. The temperature, humidity and light is not correct for them to thrive. These minis are best kept outside and are fine to plant right in the garden. They are regular roses in every respect.

Roses do need a lot of water but do not like to be drowning either. Make sure your pot drains very well. Roses require approximately one inch of water per week. In that small clay pot you should probably water them like you did, until the water starts to drip out the bottom, about twice a week. But you may need to pot them up into larger pots very shortly as they are going to out grow an 8 inch pot quickly. I would recommend putting them in about a 12 to 15 inch plastic pot. Clay pots can suck water out quickly because they are very porous. Put a coffee filter over the holes, then a thin layer of packing peanuts on the bottom and line the inside with bubble wrap before you add your soil. All of these things aid in good drainage or root insulation from hot and cold conditions.

Watering them does not cause powdery mildew or black spot. Those are both caused by fungal spores that are in the air and soil. When temperatures and humidities are right they will grow and cause disease symptoms. Some roses are more susceptible to these diseases than others.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hello, I was hoping someone could help me go in the right direction with this. A week and a half ago I bought a miniature rose plant from a grocery store for my mom for mother's day, but havent given it to her yet. I'll be giving it to her in a week or two when I see her.
Its tag says "PARADE Rose" (by Poulsen). From the title of this thread, it sounds like this plant will die if not replanted..? Is this certain?

It seems to actually be 4 plants. I am concerned because it looks like it might be showing early signs of not doing too well. The leaves look mostly fine, except some of the lowest leaves near the bottom of the plants have turned yellow and are falling off (including the little stem that theyre attached to that connects to the bigger main stems), including some new-looking tiny leaf stems. The flowers themselves, though, are what first made me concerned. The worst ones are the the deepest/darkest shade of pink (actually those ones look more like purple) of all the flowers and have become crispy and dead-looking. There's 12 full blooms total and about 3 look this way, to varying degrees, and one that seems headed in that direction. One of the other flowers is a medium shade (of pink) compared to the rest but the very edges of some its petals are turning darkish grey and look crispy. Another flower looks like its petals are starting to do this a little too. 4 of the not-dead-looking flowers' petals are curling backwards on themselves, causing the petals to form points, but otherwise appear to be close to normal health. There is one flower that looks fully fleshy, nice regularly curved petals although a few little spots of damage on some of the petals, mostly at a couple petal's edges. There are 3 (very cute) buds.
One thing that is confusing me is that the flowers are various shades of pink/purple. The dead looking ones look purple, even. The fleshy healthy looking one is a lighter, medium shade purple, and the others vary from medium pink to paleish pink. I find it confusing because I don't know which color is the color they are supposed to be, that would indicate good health. It doesnt seem to be that the different colors belong to different plants either, as some of the variations are together on the same plant. I'm concluding the dead-purple color is not good because its.. well, dead looking. Do roses' colors normally just vary that much on an individual plant?

Also, I noticed some crispy green and white mold (or mildew? or something? I dont know) growing in a couple places around the edges of the soil and mostly on the edge (lip) of the pot itself o.O. I scooped off the soil that appeared this way (it was only a little) and scraped off the part on pot, but some hard stuck on parts remain on the pot lip. There were also some dead leaves sitting atop the soil with dispersed white cob-web-like mold on it, so I took those out. Will either of these be an issue?

Before I found this website I was grateful to find a plant in such a small pot (3-4 inches high, 3-4 inches in diameter) because my mom likes to keep pots on a windowsill, and I knew this one would fit. She doesnt go outside much and she has cats that often chew on and pester plants they can get to, so other places in the house might be a sketchy idea. (Does anyone know if roses are poisonous to cats?) If I replant it in a bigger pot, they wont fit on the windowsill, so we'd probably try to find a place it can get a lot of sun (as the card said it needs bright sun?) and hope the cats dont try to eat its leaves.

I live in southern florida, and had originally put it outside in a more shady than not place, because I was nervous to put it in full sun. When it started looking a little unhealthy, I thought maybe it needed more sun but less heat (highs right now are around 90 F and lows are low 70s, and its only going to get hotter.) So I put it on a Southeastish facing windowsil inside so it wouldnt be so hot. Thats the most sun any of our windows get, unfortunately, as the tag thing says to locate in bright light if its grown indoors.
Also have been watching to make sure soil doesnt get dry since I moved it inside.. think it mightve gotten a little too dry before that (how much is too much water?)

Any advice? I'd like it to be in bloom when I give it to my mom (in a week or two)...if possible. Is there any way to keep it in small pots without being too unkind to it? Perhaps separating the four plants and putting them in separate small pots? or would this still be very stifling? of course I don't want to kill it.

Whats the range of time I could repot it during? Not sure if I should repot before or after giving to my mom.

OH And one very specific question!! I have Miracle Gro Seed Starter mix, which has been sitting open for a couple months over a year (not sure if that has any bearing). Would this be okay or not okay to use if I repot them?

This is the bag I have:
http://www.amazon.com/Miracle-Gro-0050844-323-Seed-Starter-Potting/dp/B001W8U2NY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337820161&sr=8-1

Thanks so much for any advice on any one of my questions! dont feel obligated to write any novel-length responses like my question! LOL (sorry for the long descriptions.. I tend to get detailed)
Anyway, Thank you!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Thu, May 24, 12 at 11:26

Yes, there are probably 3 or 4 plants in the pot. The growers do this because it makes them look fuller and they sell better. They can be separated but that may risk losing them too. Those root balls are very small in the tiny pot and any damage to them could result in their demise.

Rose blooms often change colors as they mature. That's normal. Some will start out darker and fade to white. Others do the reverse by getting darker as they age. Remove the old, spent blooms and it will grow new buds to replace them. This will take anywhere from 6 to 8 weeks.

The crusty stuff on the soil is probably minerals or salts that have collected on the top from watering. Scrape it off or repot with fresh soil. You don't need starter soil but you do need a good potting soil not garden soil. Regular dirt is too heavy for potted roses and will not drain properly.

As far as I know roses are not harmful to cats. As a matter of fact they're edible for humans. Many people make tea and jam from roses. But it certainly won't be good for the roses if the cats chew on them, lol!

Put it outside in a place that gets morning sun. It needs sunlight to grow and bloom Keep it moist but not soggy wet and give it some balanced fertilizer.

For the most part these gift roses are meant to be disposable but they don't have to be. It is a regular rose and will grow and bloom outside, planted in the ground, for years just like any other rose. But most homes do not have the right conditions for roses to grow properly for any length of time. And if it does grow well inside it will need to be put into a larger pot. That 4 inch pot will not be big enough for a full size miniature rose. The sooner you repot it into something larger the quick it will begin to grow. You don't need to get a huge pot but something maybe 10 inches across to start out with. But it may out grow that eventually too. "Miniature" roses only refers to the size of the blooms and leaves. It does not refer to the eventual mature size of the bush. Miniature roses can get as large as any regular size rose bush, 3 feet tall and wide. There are even miniature climbers that will get 10 to 12 feet tall just like a regular climber would.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you so much for replying. I was hoping I'd hear from someone quickly, as the roses seem to be doing worse. I think I may try to separate them and put them in bigger pot(s) this weekend.

If I replant the 4 different rose plants in separate pots, would each pot need to be 10 inches? I think I have two 8 inch, or so, pots sitting around.

Also, how do I know if the bag of miracle grow seed starter mix that I already have is potting soil, not garden soil? I'd like to use it if I can without hurting the roses. I dont know much about plants and gardening :S On the back of the bag it says that the soil will fill pots of 8 inches. Is this a good sign that it's potting soil?

And if I go ahead and put them out on my porch, the hot weather (about 90 F midday now and hotter later in summer) wont bother them?

What a relief to know they are probably not poisonous to cats. That makes locating them much easier!

Again, thank you so much for responding. I'm feeling more confident about repotting these guys on my own (I've never done any more involved plant work like this on my own, just seen other people do it some, so I'm a bit nervous!)
Thank you !


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

How will I know if I've saved my potted gift rose in time? I kept mine inside for a week before planting it outside in a larger pot.

I am reading to wait 2-4-6 weeks to see if the rose becomes established. My rose has been outside for a week, and it looks like...well, a stick plant now, but it seems to have developed some sort of roots. It feels sturdy in its new soil, but it does look pretty bad. I'd appreciate any tips or guidelines for if/when I should be seeing any new growth.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi There.
Do you want to keep it in a pot? I planted my 1.00 grocery store rescue plant in the yard and it is blooming its little hiney off. I didn't know that they were so tough. I have one that I haven't transplanted yet. It is also blooming to beat the band. I don't know that you need to offer much besides sun and well draining soil. They are tougher than one would imagine.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

This is all so helpful. Thank you, fleursuzie for the thorough instructions.

I'll bump this up again because it's spring, Easter, Valentines Day, and maybe people have roses they want to save. I read this thread, then went to do grocery shopping at Trader Joes, and what do you know....there was a little yellow rose sitting right next to the card-swipe machine. Had to get it!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 24, 13 at 19:15

Lol. Socks, that's exactly why they put them there!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Okay I need help :( My 6 year old daughter got me a potted Kordana Rose. It had blooms when she gave it t me, and has since lost all of them, then regained one here and there and also lost them as well. So it's basically leaves all the time with an occasional bloom. Is this supposed to happen? Today I am repotting (first time ever doing this so I'm so happy I found this post!) I have four plants in one 4in pot. Seems as though that's way too crowded? So anyway, I have lots of leaves turning yellow which is why my mom is insisting I repot. I don't see any sort of fungus, it doesn't appear to be root bound (according to my mom) I water it daily....sits on my window seal. That's about it! So I guess my question is, what am I doing wrong, or what should I do better so my daughters heart doesn't break if it dies?!As well as mine :( Also, I noticed you said that it's better to use soil without fertilizer at first, then a few weeks later add some. Would that be a liquid fertilizer I would add? If so, any suggestions? I'm thinking I should repot in a 12in pot around the outside perimeter of the pot with the 4 plants evenly spaced? Please excuse my ignorance. I don't know anything about plants or flowers but this is my first step in the right direction! I really appreciate any helpful input!!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Wed, May 15, 13 at 19:26

Nat, if you've had it in a 4 inch pot for a long time it probably could use a larger pot now. For one thing the soil in the small pot is probably pretty well depleted. For another if you want it to grow larger and bloom more it needs more root space. It will only produce the growth and blooms it's roots can support. Small roots/small plant. Go up to something maybe 10 to 15 inches and watch it grow!

I don't know what you mean by loosing the blooms. Do you mean they open, age and then fall off or they never open and the buds fall off? All roses bud, bloom then fade and die off. That's normal. Depending on the rose they can last anywhere from a day to about a week and then they die and sometimes fall off or need to be cut off, called dead heading. Then the rose will put on new growth and bloom again. It can take anywhere from 4 to 8 weeks for a new bloom to open.

If you are watering every day that's probably too much and may be why some of your leaves are yellowing. You should wait until the top inch of soil is dry between waterings. Then water thoroughly again. You should give it some fertilizer too occasionally. Any balanced fertilizer will work. Just read the package carefully and follow all the directions.

When you repot I DO NOT suggest you try and separate those plants. You will damage the roots badly in the process and stand the chance of losing them all. I have tried it many times with little success. Just pot the entire plant up into a larger pot being careful to not disturb the roots. Make sure the pot has good drainage holes and that you use POTTING soil and not any kind of garden or top soil.

And take it outside! Roses HATE being in the house. If you can plant it in the ground that would be even better. In zone 6 it should winter fine for you with maybe just a little bit of leaf mulch on it in the fall for protection. But even that isn't mandatory because I have many minis in the ground that winter here with no protection at all. If you do not plant it you can still winter it outside in a garage or shed. Just water it once a month all winter long and bring it back out next spring when you start to see some new growth on it.

Hope all that helps and ask if you have any more questions.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Dumb me, I have always planted mine right in the ground and have rarely lost one. They have wintered over beautifully.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you so much for your instructions. I've lost a lot of the miniature roses over the years and have recently had some success. This should improve the odds a great deal.

I've added this post to my favorites.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you so much for posting this. I've lost quite a few mini's over the years. Hopefully now with your information I'll be able to have one that will actually grow for me and not die off after a few weeks. Mini's have never done well for me. I honestly never knew how to care for them.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

My 4 year old daughter picked one out for me as a get well gift. I just had surgery 3 days ago. I had mini roses outside in the past but after a couple of years they started to die off. I wasn't sure why. I would always plant them in the ground with just loosening up the roots a little. I'll follow these tips and see how they turn out. I have a pink Korodan mini rose. Right now my husband sat it out on our front porch where it gets shade from the afternoon sun. I hope it does well for me. When I get better I'm planning on putting it in the ground after I acclimate it to full sun.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I know this topic is quite old, but I'm hoping the OP's information might help me save a couple of minis I purchased last week.

I'm known for my brown thumbs, but I'm determined this time.

I've just repotted them and have 3 plants out of the two pots I bought. I've been able to work out that even though I was trying to acclimatise them to the sun, I've not only been sunburning them but also over watering them (the leaves were turning yellow and drying out/curling). I've pruned the tops back to pretty much bare sticks, more out of necessity as the leaves turned sick, and I've cut back the root system to remove most of the browny, wilty roots. Each plant still had some white roots, so I'm hoping they will spring back with the right care.

I have another mini which I purchased a few days later and I haven't repotted it yet, as 1. it's looking healthy, 2. I'm weary of putting it in the same pot as the three sickly ones (large 30cm square pot). I'd rather get a new separate pot for it.

I'll planning to only keep it in the store pot for another week or two until it's well gotten over the shock of changing environments, and then repot. If anyone thinks this is the wrong way of doing it, please let me know. There was a bud on the plant but I pruned below it as it started browning (I was initially overwatering it too, but only for a couple of days, not 5 or so as with the first two), and there is one very strong stick with healthy leaves, even though it's been getting direct afternoon sun (but it's in the shade for all but 2 or so hours of the day).

I should mention, I'm in Queensland, Australia, and currently our temperatures are quite high, night time probably doesn't much below 70F and daytime easily reaches or goes over 100F.

With my sickly minis, should I put them in the same spot as the healthy one, so they're getting the afternoon direct sun too? Or should I keep them in the shade for a few days yet? They were repotted this morning. How long until I see any (hopefully) progress?

I forgot to add too, that in particular, one of the two sicklys was FULL of fertiliser pellets... very close to the base and the roots. Only became really evident when I took it out of the pot. No doubt it contributed to the issue.

Thank you in advance,
Jade.

This post was edited by jwuiske on Fri, Feb 14, 14 at 0:19


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

The saddest little roses you ever did see...


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

You need to keep them in the shade then slowly start acclimating them to the sun.

However, after looking at your picture, I am afraid that it might be too late for them. But still try. Miracles do happen.

The 2 in the nursery pot look fine. Don't over-water. They should be ok to transplant whenever you are ready. (I say "they", I see two stems, so I am resuming it is two plants).

Good Luck!!!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Actually it is just one in the pot, the green pot obscures where the two stems meet. There was another plant in there but it never developed from when whomever it was that planted them originally placed the seedlings in. Yeah I am worried that the ones in the green pot are a bit far gone but I'm keeping my fingers crossed. (and my hubby says they will be the most well kept sticks in history haha).


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

To Seil:
Why are you so against separating? Yes, you could have some loss, but so far I have only encountered about a 25% loss (on ocassion, but mostly, no loss at all) ....so if you have 4 roses in one of those little pots, you lose one, you still have 3 roses left. If you plant as a "group", all but one will die if planted together.....or if more than one survives, they will become so intertwined that they will be very substitutable to things like black spot. In addition, if one or more of the roses is diseased, keeping it with the group will cause it to spread to the others.

Just wondering on your reason for not separating.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 14, 14 at 19:26

Jade, I have to agree with fleursuzie that the big pot doesn't look good...BUT...all of these are own root plants and it is possible that if the roots are still OK they will come back. So be patient for a while and see what happens. You really have nothing to lose. I would put the newer ones in another pot. For one thing these minis are capable of getting fairly large in size so that one pot would be too small for all of them. For another it will be easier to care for them in their own pot. Over watering is the biggest mistake people make (I've done it myself with these little ones) so be careful with that. In your hot temps I think you'll need to find a place where these roses only get morning sun. Roses really need at least 6 hours of sun to bloom well but if it's that hot you don't want them to cook so look for some place on the east side of your house to put them so they won't get the hot western afternoon sun. Yes, that fertilizer may have contributed to the decline of your roses by burning the roots. When you do fertilize always keep it from sitting against the plant. You want it out more towards the drip line. But you shouldn't need to fertilize it for a while yet.

Fluersuzie, I just want people to know the risks of trying to separate these tiny plants before hand so they know what they're getting into. These little gift roses are always barely rooted new cuttings with tiny root systems. Trying to separate them without doing fatal damage to the roots is VERY hard. For an experienced rosarian it may be no problem at all but for the person getting their first rose it could be a disaster and permanently turn them off to roses. In my experience I lose at least 75% and sometimes all of them when I try to separate. I've been growing roses for 30 years and it's difficult for me to get them to separate and survive so I do not recommend it for newbies. Besides that I've found I get a much fuller bush when I leave the cuttings all together. I've never had "all but one die" when I left them together. Usually they all grow together as one nice full plant. If you have black spot you have it. Separating them will not stop the spread of it. It's just like any other own root plant with multiple stems coming up from the root systems below ground.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Posted by jwuiske 11 (My Page) on Fri, Feb 14, 14 at 3:03

I think those black little canes have already died. Are they not?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Jujujojo: When I cut the stems back a couple of days ago on the ones in the green pot, there was still green/almost green on the inside of the stems. Although they look really far gone I am hopeful that they might come back, even if it's by sprouting new shoots instead of growing from the visible sticks.

seil: The healthy one had a dead seedling which obviously died very early on - as I tugged on the brown, 2 inch high stick the whole thing came out and the roots were still in the form of the little seedling cube. On the other hand, the three sickly ones in the green pot had root systems that were about 4-5" long when I took them out and separated them. I certainly was overwatering them, as was evident from the very damp soil I pulled them out of, and the bottom inch or two was that sludgy brown colour. So I trimmed back the roots to about 3-4" on all three, and thinned them of most other really wilted roots. I noticed one plant had a really healthy brand new white thick root, amongst a lot of new fine, white root growth. The other two also exhibited quite a lot of fine white root growth.

We have two balconies, front facing SE and back facing NW. The front has barely any overhead cover, and the morning/day sun is quite hot at the moment and lasts probably until about midday. The rear balcony is in the shade until about 4pm, and up on the table where they're living at the moment they get about 2-3 hours of sunshine, however it's filtered slightly for at least half of that time by tall trees on the fenceline, And, currently, we tend to sit on the rear balcony much more frequently, which means that I'm paying close attention to them. I think this is the primary reason why the healthy one is doing so well, in that although the afternoon sun is supposed to be hotter, it's actually not in this location due to the slight filtering. I think in the winter, by which time they will be stronger (whether the three sicklies make it or whether I get one or two new ones) I will definitely have them on the front balcony. Until it gets a bit cooler and they get a bit stronger, I'm more inclined to leave them where they are, perhaps moving them under the table they're on in a couple of weeks to extend the sunlight they get by about an hour - please let me know if you agree now that you have more information about the locations.

Even though it's hot, I'm going to try watering every two days, not each day, as with the sicklies I wasn't adding much water to them, but would do so each day. And the moisture in that soil was unbelievable (when I repotted). About the middle of today I did as the OP suggested and "drowned" the green pot, tugged on the three sicklies to get rid of any air and patted down the soil around them. I've let them drain without the pot's saucer (the pot has one hole in the bottom, about 3/4" wide). How long until I should water them again? two or three days?

I'll see how they go, if all three survive and thrive, I will likely separate them out into individual pots about the same size as the green pot when they're older.

Now, in this post I'm effectively laying out my plans based on the advice in the previous posts, but I certainly still feel I don't know if I'm right, so any feedback is kindly appreciated!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 15, 14 at 19:53

I think you've done the best you can for them and all you can do is wait and see now. As for watering, don't just water every 2 days like clock work. Check the soil first and see if it needs watering. Depending on the weather and humidity they may not need water that soon. Let the tops of the pots dry out a little bit between waterings.

And check the drainage in the pot. Roses hate having soggy roots. If the bottom of the pot was a soupy brown sludge it was too wet and holding water. If possible try and drill a couple of extra holes in the bottom and DO NOT put any kind of tray under it that holds water. I like to put mine up on something that allows free drainage from all the holes. For large pots I have those wire trolleys but for smaller ones I have some open work kitchen trivets that I use. So the pot is raised from what ever surface it's on and water can flow out of the pot easily.

Even if the first ones don't make it the newer one has a good chance. Just put it in a nice pot about one or two sizes bigger than it's in now, with some good potting soil, put it in the sun and leave it be. These gift roses are pretty much forced to bloom for what ever holiday they put them out for so it's tired. Give it some time to recuperate and don't kill it with kindness (or too much water or fertilizer) and it will come back.


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How do I revive my rose

Help me, my rose keeps wilting, I fertilized it with all purpose water soluble and it kinda dried and died, Some leaves withered and I am new to this, how do I make it better


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 22, 14 at 12:44

Hi, Plant! Don't feel bad. These little gift roses are very difficult to keep alive in the house. They're grown and sold to be disposable like a florist rose.

The first thing you need to do is take off that pretty paper wrapping on it so the pot will drain well and isn't sitting in a pool of water. Put it in the sunniest spot you can find in your house. Find a dish of some kind ( I use a cake tin) and put some pebbles on the bottom. put water in it to just below the top of the pebbles and put the pot on top so the bottom of the pot is not touching the water in the tray. This raises the humidity around the rose. Be careful not to over water it. You want it to be moist be never soggy wet and let it dry out just a touch between waterings. Like the top inch or so should be dry before adding more water. You don't need to do any pruning yet. Just remove the spent blooms.

As soon as it's warm enough get it outside. Roses are not house plants and your little rose will be much happier planted in the ground outside!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Well, a couple of weeks on and here's what I have to report:

The saddest little rose sticks you ever did see are no more... I kept looking for any signs of life, then finally today I decided to investigate further. I pulled them out of the pot and there was no sign of new roots. I broke them at the base just above the roots and they cracked - they certainly were beyond saving.

On a happier note, the one that was in the separate pot in the background has new leaf buds EVERYWHERE. Two sets of buds have already emerged into brand new leaf structures, one of which is as large as the one you can see in the photo from 2 weeks ago, the other leaf cluster is about half that size at the moment. And both of these leaf clusters are on the stalk that was completely bare a fortnight ago. I've noticed two of the leaves (one leaf on each of the two large stalks) getting slight yellowing at the tip, so perhaps I'm still adding a bit too much water. But, watering every 2-3 days (even in this heat) seems to certainly be working for this little rose. I'm eagerly awaiting for it to bloom, although that's probably a few weeks off yet. It's still in the same position getting a couple of hours of afternoon sun.

Not sure about repotting it at the moment... if it appears to be happy should I worry about it now?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

My husband gave me this red mini gift rose for Valentines day. I've gotten them before but never had any luck getting them to make it in the house till spring when I can plant them in the yard. That is till I read this thread. (photo taken this morning 4/6/14)
I followed the instructions and tips and managed to keep it alive. In fact, the only thing dead on this mini red rose bush was the blooms. You can see there are still a few dead rose petals sitting in the pot at the base.
I put a plastic food storage container under the pot upside down to elevate the potted rose and keep it from sitting in any water that would drain out the bottom into that white aluminum tub. I kept it watered really well.
I didn't have it in any direct sunlight at all. In fact, it was 3 feet from a window in my living room. I get very little direct sunlight coming in my windows because of a large porch outside that extends quite a bit.
As you can see from the photo its doing really well. I'm very happy with it. It was funny how even my husband kept eyeing the poor thing. He thought the dead buds meant the plant itself was dying off. I had to explain to him that with any plant the blooms eventually do die and fall off. But he wasn't convinced lol
Yesterday it was nice out so I sat it in the yard in an area that got some filtered sunlight and when it got a little cooler out I brought it back inside. I plan on doing this every day till its warm enough to plant it in my yard.
So ladies and gents, if I can keep a potted gift rose going through the winter in the house for a few months I think anyone can do it. Just follow the directions on this thread. I must have had 5 or more of these in the past 20 years but never till now has one lasted till spring time.
Just elevate that pot off the base so it drains really well, keep it watered..( I watered mine once a week ) And put it in a spot that gets at least filtered sun. As I said above, mine got absolutely no direct sunlight and still made it. :D


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hi all...last time I posted on this particular thread was back in 08. I was glad to see this thread still going. A few days ago I received a mini as a gift. It has some real problems. At least the bottom 3/4 of each plant (4 in the pot) came with almost all the leaves dead. So I removed all the dead leaves so now there are leaves and some blooms only on the top 1/4 of each plant. The bottom 3/4 of all 4 are now mostly bare. I am wondering if I should do a severe cut-back on all the plants and let them kind of start over. I haven't transplanted them into other pots yet. Will get to that this week. I am in a condo so I can't plant them outdoors. The mini that I mentioned on this thread 6 years ago actually did very nicely potted indoors for about 4 years. Then it died....couldn't save it. Anyway, back to what I have just received. Should I cut them back or leave them as they are...or something in between? Any advise would be very appreciated! Thanks!

Linda
EDIT: After I posted the above post, I just noticed that most of the remaining leaves are now in varying stages of drooping. I have them in a sunny window but have the sunlight filtered on them for now as they adjust....IF they adjust. I just don't know what to do about these little guys in order to save them. :-(

This post was edited by shenue on Sat, Apr 26, 14 at 15:51


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

The leaves are turning yellow today. :-(


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Apr 27, 14 at 15:24

You did really well, Sunflower! It looks very happy and healthy!

Shenue, yellowing leaves usually means either too much or too little water. Make sure the soil is damp but not soggy and if you have a tray under the pot take it off. I really would recommend that you start acclimating them to the outside as soon as possible. They'll be much happier there. Wait until they seem to be recovering and putting on some new growth then transplant them into a bigger pot or plant them in the ground. I do not recommend trying to separate them because it usually does too much damage to the roots and they die but that's up to you.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you for your advice seil!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I just wanted to bump this wonderful thread. Thanks to it, I realized I had done practically everything wrong I could with the potted rose I received a few weeks ago. It is very tiny (only a 6cm pot), but resilient. Following seil's advice I have potted up in a bigger pot, cut down the watering and put it outside. I hope it makes it. Would a light fertilizer be good for it once it dries out some?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Hello, I planted these 4 months ago and they were a miniature pink, lush rose bush but they have been dying and now I'm left with this!! Slowly the roses died one by one and turned brown so I had to keep cutting them off. I did notice a little bit of spider webbing on a few roses so I'm not sure if that's what killed them? My question is... Is there any saving these??? I know they are ugly but the stems are kind of "flexible"


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

@amylee: I am sorry to break the bad news but it is already long gone :(
the spider webbing is from spider mites.
can you give more detail about what you did with this rose within the four months you had it for?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you so much for the reply. I figured they were... But I wanted to see if there was any saving them since they were from my fiances memorial. :( but I do have another miniature rose bush that I hope not to kill again. So this picture was a week or two before the previous picture. I think this was spider mites??? But I was told to dig a hole and fill it with water. So I planted it and watched it for when I needed to water but the leaves were turning yellow and brown? But I was watering but trying not to over water. So home depot told me to get peat moss and miracle grow. So I did an inch of peat moss and fed it miracle grow once a week. Then the blooms were coming in a white color and then falling off. When they turned brown and looked diseased I pruned them but then I was only left with one bloom left.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

This was before the peat moss


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

This was after the peat moss and plant food.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

amylee - I've not long ago gone through the same ordeal. One question for you... When you got it at home depot, was it in airconditioning? Or in normal outside weather? And then, when you got it home, did you pop it straight in the ground or acclimatised it slowly by moving the pot towards the final location over a couple of weeks?
I've still got one of my 4 roses alive, still in its original small pot for the moment, and it is slowly coming back (it's winter here at the moment so I'm not expecting much for now), but the others I did everything wrong. Reading this whole page of posts is the only reason the fourth one is still alive.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Jwuiske- I actually got it as a gift so I'm not sure but I had it indoors for about two weeks and then planted it straight in the ground in a hole filled with water. And I'm not sure if I was the one that killed it or if it had a spider mite infestation?? But like I said the leaves turned yellow and brown, then all the leaves started falling off and the stems were turning a purple color under the blooms.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Ok, going from indoors at home to outdoors was probably a bit of a shock for it. I had the same happen with mine (in pots) going from indoor/aircon at the store to outdoors on the balcony still in the pot - too much sun too quick. They're delicate little things, unfortunately. But one thing I've learned is that it is SOOOO easy to overwater even when you don't think you're overwatering. I literally give about 1/8th of a cup of water to mine every few days (being winter) and that is enough. Any more than that and it would be too much. And mine had gone down to bare sticks and now I've got new shoots everywhere (keep in mind it's still in a pot, I'll probably plant into a larger pot in the spring). But yeah, with my first three that died I had them in full sun for an hour or two per day straight out of indoors and that was too much of a shock for them. What I did with my fourth one was had it in the shade for 95% of the day whilst it accustomed to the humidity and weather of its new environment, then let it have a bit more sun each day.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Ooooo, I never thought of that. That makes sense though. So I have these yellow mini roses that I received last week so how long should I adjust them to the sun before planting them? And yeah for me is so hard to tell when they need water. With the one I just received I try to just feel the soil in the pot and unless its dry I don't give it water. Also, should i feed it at all?? Thank you so much


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Feeding is one thing I haven't delved into yet. I believe yes, but hopefully someone who knows more here will be able to answer that for you.

Re adjusting to climate... Basically, think of what the rose is used to... if you didn't buy it then assume it came from an airconditioned space, to be on the safe side. So a few days indoors, maybe after a couple of days move to a window that gets a little sun for a minimum time in the day, then put it on your balcony or under a tree where most of the day it's in the shade but it gets some filtered sunlight, and then slowly move towards and then sit the pot in the final position. Uprooting the rose is enough shock, so just watch how it's doing as you make each step. My friend, for whom I bought a rose the same time that I bought my three (air conditioned store), put it on a table on her balcony in full shade for about two days and then she's had it sitting on another table that gets filtered morning light (lots of other plants on there so it wasn't getting full sun, just through shady patches) and her rose is doing amazing. She has another in her garden that's well established and it gets similar light, slightly less filtered as there's just a few larger plants around it. My surviving one is on a table where it gets very no actual sunlight hitting it other than in the afternoons (which I'll have to rectify before summer hits as afternoon sun here is superbly hot in the summer). And so far as watering, obviously it will depend on how hot it is etc, and I've got very little practise, but just a little bit of water, as I said I give about an 8th of a cup, when it's dry. But be wary, as the top soil may be dry whilst the bottom is bogged, so either dig your finger in or just do it a day or two after you notice the top soil is dry.
Hope all of that helps with your new rose :)


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

We'll thank you so much for all this information! I'm such a newbie with gardening a few plants I got are turning yellow and brown so I moved them inside and I'm going to try this. I'm glad you saved your rose though. These are my new yellow minis.


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

Thank you all for such great advice. I purchased this mini at the grocery store yesterday for $2.50.. It is my first rose, I followed all the instructions. I live in an apartment and all my plants are kept in containers, over the winter I do bring my perennials into my screened in porch, Will my mini rose be alright if left on the porch over the winter? Right now I have them under my grow lights until all this stormy weather passes and I can put them out under a tree before they get put into the sunshine. I think they handled being separated pretty well, What do you all think? Thanks again for any & all advice.
Christine


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 18, 14 at 18:25

They look very pretty!


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I bought a pink Kordana Rose from Meijers last night, right now it looks very healthy! There is just a little yellowing of the very bottom leaves. I was wondering if it would be a good idea to replant them now, or wait for awhile? I currently have blooms! They are kept indoors and I plan on keeping them indoors until next spring.

I don't know what kind they are, as the tag only says "Kordana @Rose"


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Rose Bud drop

My rose buds are falling off the stalk just as though someone has bit it and the bud discolours to slight yellow to brown and falls off.

Every one of the roses which bloomed was brown and spoiled from inside. over watering or a pest or??? any ideas?


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RE: How to save a potted gift rose

I had no idea this thread was here. I just bought a 'generic' pink rose from the supermarket, where they were outside in the hot, humid 95F sun and thriving, so I will probably leave them outside in the (shaded) front porch and water them with everything else until I can find a pot to put them in.


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