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Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Posted by wuvie 7-ish (My Page) on
Sat, Apr 27, 13 at 20:44

For some time, I have been scrubbing the internet trying to find not necessarily a cultivar name, but perhaps a nudge in the right area of identification.

(Pardon me, for I am about to copy and paste.) :-)

Several years ago, I found a beautiful wild pink climbing rose growing in the ditch along a back road here in Northeastern Oklahoma. It was tiny, but blooming profusely. I didn't think too much while transplanting it next to a garden hoop, but it
multiplied quickly, and is now covering much of the hoop.

The roses are tiny, and the canes are very, very long, and must be tied to the garden hoop. There doesn't seem to be any scent to it.

I can't get over how fast this thing grows, and how many new shoots continue to come up. This year (2013) I was able to dig up several volunteers that rooted along a cane on the soil. My apologies, they are spoken for.

Presently on a mission for correct identification. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, as roses are not my forte.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

As an added note, the blooms are PACKED with petals. As the roses have just begun to form buds, it will be a while before I can pluck a bloom and count the petals.


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Hi wuvie.
You might start in the direction of wichurana ramblers.
Excelsa comes to mind- but I'm not saying that's it, there are many ramblers and many small differences in them.
The fact that it has those red pedicles should be helpful to someone more knowledgeable.
Good pictures of the plant and of the flowers and buds.
A close up of the leaves might be helpful too.


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

I got to thinking about it and I'm not sure I should say wichurana. I really don't know that much to know the differences between wichurana and other types of ramblers, but from your pictures and description it does seem like a rambler of some sort.

Forgot an important question-does it bloom once a year?

btw-I like the hog panel hoop you have it on.


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Hello, and thank you so much!

I truly appreciate your efforts.

Here is an image of the foliage...


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Another shot...


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

I'm no expert but wouldn't the fuzzy bits coming off the stipules suggest a multiflora ancestry? Perhaps a polyantha of some sort?


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Super Excelsa has the overall look and your red pedicels but its buds look a bit mossy and yours don't. It does have both multiflora and wichuraiana in its pedigree.

Here is a link that might be useful: Helpmefind


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Many thanks, Donald. I tried the site you suggested, but after only entering 'pink' and 'rose', the site told me that I had to pay to continue. :-(


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, May 2, 13 at 19:21

Small glossy round leaves and various other characters typical Wichurana Rambler - it will be one of those. Most prominent one is 'Dorothy Perkins'.


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Thank you all so much for your help. I'm off to search for Wichurana Rambler. I really appreciate all of your posts. :-)


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

i did the same thang with a rose exactly like yours. in a ditch on the side of the road. just the same. it grows like crazy. ive had it 6 years or so now. im just glad i gave it the room to grow. here it is. last year when it was in bloom.


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 18, 13 at 1:39

There's a whole set of these types, mostly in different shades of pink, and they are commonly encountered. The key term might be Walsh rambler rather than Wichurana rambler, or maybe both are applicable - I'd have to look back into it.


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Thought I would drop back in, now that it is time to prune this beautiful beast, which is absolutely taking over, but I love it!

Found an interesting site thanks to all of your tips, and I feel very confident in voting along with "Dorothy Perkins".

Thank you, everyone!

Here is a link that might be useful: Rambling Roses


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 12, 14 at 11:58

Thanks for the update! Post a pic when your monster is in bloom, lol!


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RE: Tiny blooms, l-o-n-g thorny canes. Help?

Wuvie- as soon as I read "beautiful beast" I could hear Sir David Attenborough "This beautiful beast, once unknown to science has been identified, and for now the naturalist is happy to sit back and appreciate the view, although the exuberence can be overwhelming to live with."


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