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organic rose fertilizer

Posted by gardenbear1 6 Ma. (My Page) on
Sun, Jun 15, 14 at 21:13

My gardens are organic and want to keep it that way, I've add some new roses to the gardens after 10 yrs, I want would like to feed them but not sure what to use that is really organic,once they start to grow I want to grow them like I do all my other roses in a rich organic soil.

Thanks for any and all help you can give me.

Bear


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Hi Bear: I love your username, short & easy. My should had chosen "Straw" as my user-name.

Safest organic is a bag of Hummus & manure at the store, sold for $1.49 per bag, just spread it around roses, but make a "well" around the trunk, so water can be collected in the middle.

Chickitity doo-doo is cheap, but high in nitrogen & salt, best used in the spring or winter right before the ground freeze. I won't use that during hot summer.

Since your zone is 6 MA ... most soil there is acidic. If you have blue hydrangea, that means your soil is acidic. Bag of Hummus & manure for $1.49 is the safest way.

Good luck on your roses .. I would love to see your pics. too. Thanks in advance.


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

  • Posted by jim1961 6a Central Pa. (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 15, 14 at 22:54

I had a professional soil test done that revealed everything was ok with our soil. (PH/Nutrients/etc.)
Our soil has some clay and holds nutrients decent and retains water decently.

So I have stopped using any type of store bought fertilizer but I still spread cold homemade compost around our roses in the Spring and Fall.
They say roses are heavy feeders but I found with our soil and just using compost they still bloom well without using store bought fertilizers.

I do not fertilize first year roses.

(If you need or want to use fertilizer on first year roses)
Personally I would only use a organic liquid fertilizer on first year roses after they have bloomed. Like maybe a organic fish/kelp fertilizer or something.

Sometimes we must experiment to see what works best for us in our own gardens...

So please consider all opinions and see what works best for you...

Best of luck!


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

  • Posted by jim1961 6a Central Pa. (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 15, 14 at 23:05

I have also used the Humus & Manure bags Strawberryhill speaks about some years with good results.
I've also used dehydrated Manure in bags which costs around $6.99 around here at times.


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Hi Straw, Thanks for the info, I haven't had a blue hydrangea in years LOL, I've been mulching my roses every spring and it helps but they still need a boost in the spring, I don't have much clay in the soil if you dig down about 2 ft. you hit sand and lots of it, over they years I've added lots of mulch to help the soil and keep every thing alive, I'll post pic when I get on lap top.
Jim, as a rule I don't fertilizer the first year but the area the new roses are going in has never had any growing but clover, so I want to give them a little boost.

Thanks for the help
Bear


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Hi Bear: I found a useful link today which shows pictures of nutritional deficiency in plants, using tomato's leaves. The site is quite accurate. My soil is heavy alkaline clay, pH 7.7, with a layer of yellowish limestone at the bottom.

A few of my tomatoes have brownish spots around the stems .. I always cut off the upper part of tomato, before serving. Now I realize it's boron deficiency. Will have to put more chicken manure after it's done raining. Chicken manure is high in boron, zinc, and copper.

Here is a link that might be useful: Nutritional deficiency symptoms


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Hi Bear: You have acidic sandy soil, right? Magnesium is often deficient in sandy soil, along with calcium. If you look at the below nutritional chart by Cornell University, at pH 6, calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, and manganese are less available. Animal manures have plenty of such nutrients.

My soil is heavy clay, dolomitic limestone, very sticky, at pH 7.7. EarthCo. tested my soil to be exceedingly HIGH in magnesium. Magnesium is what makes clay sticky & heavy, and mud-like. I got some clay stuck at the back of my plastic slippers, can't get it off unless I pry with a knife.

Here is a link that might be useful: What's less availabe at what pH level.


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

This site by the University of Arizona has an excellent picture that shows the difference between magnesium deficiency vs. manganese & iron and zinc, see below:

It's the most organized and useful site, since it outlines how to treat nutrient-deficiencies in plants:

Here is a link that might be useful: Symptoms of plant deficiencies & how to treat


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RE: organic tomato fertilizer

I have a few tomato plants, ate 2 of yellow Taxi, Heirloom tomatoes already. They are healthy, grow nicely, and taste sweet too. I use Kellogg's natural & organic for tomato, vegetable and herb. In case some of us want to grow tomato, Heirloom is my favorite choice. The fertilizer info, N:P:K 4:6:3, in percentage, plus mycorrhizae and beneficial bacteria.

Below is a bouquet from my garden, picked this Sunday, a group of four each Janet (an Austin rose) and Blue Girl rose:

This post was edited by seaweed0212 on Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 18:37


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

  • Posted by jim1961 6a Central Pa. (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 19:18

What source do you use to obtain Heirloom tomatoes Seaweed?
Our area has serious blight problems (leaves and tomatoes turn black) whether tomatoes are in the ground or in a large container using a potting mix they get it. So I usually buy certain hybrids which grow real well here without getting any fungus diseases.

But I'm willing to try a Heirloom tomato plant next year.
I do not spray though...

PS Your roses look great Seaweed! :-)

This post was edited by jim1961 on Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 19:19


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Thank you Strawberryhill for uploading this photo from my email, Janet has the pink blend hue and lavender BG. All fresh cut early morning today!


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Hi Jim: I got curious about "tomato blight" so I googled for pictures. We don't have that problem in my limestone clay. I had tomato-blossom-end-rot last year in the rock-hard-alkaline clay, but I fixed it this year with plenty of gypsum.

I checked for "blight-resistant" varieties, but those have to be ordered as seeds. Meijers has the largest selection of Bonnie's Heirloom tomatoes.

Calcium, see below, helps with blossom-end-rot. I don't mulch my tomatoes either, just bare dirt. I wonder if sprinkle a bit of lime-powder would help with blight? Today I cut a spray of Annie L. McDowell, grown right next to the patio (based with white limestone). It was dark in the evening, so I accidentally snipped a bud ... amazingly the stem was so tough, that my scissor didn't harm it.

Below is my back yard tomato bed. I also have larger bed in front ... originally I intended for roses, but the deer kept eating, so I planted tomatoes. Picture taken June 19, they were planted as babies 1st week of June.

Here is a link that might be useful: Bonnie's tip to conquer blossom end rot

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 22:48


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

  • Posted by jim1961 6a Central Pa. (My Page) on
    Sun, Jun 22, 14 at 23:36

Hi Straw, I also have bare dirt under our tomato plants.
A few years ago our state started having our tomato plants wiped out by late blight...

 photo IMG_1069_zpsa16e60ad.jpg

Here is a link that might be useful: Info on our blight


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Hi, Jim1961
Mother's Kitchen, Costa Mesa, CA has been carrying variety of Heirloom tomato, one foot plant for $1.99, last year, I had plenty (at least 30), enough to share with friends, it was Cherokee purple, grew them in the big pot with organic soil, using same Kellogg's organic fertilizer for tomato, vegetable and herb, few times, good from early spring till summer, this year yellow Taxi & Black Krim, Home Depot also sell Heirloom tomato, my favorite kind, juicy & sweeter. Enjoying growing your tomato!


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Dear Straw, may I call you this nickname? Sounds cute!
Your group of tomatoes are so healthy and green, I eat few tomato, practical for growing in the pot last year as well as this year, I add 2 fresh tomato, home grown bay leaves, garlic, sweet onion and spinach for my own black bean pasta, it is my own gluten free dish. I do not add salt, pepper or sugar, tomato is sweet enough. It is good that we talk about tomato besides roses, I do not buy chemicals to spray my garden. Heirloom tomato is easy to grow, have sticks to support the vines, no bug, organic tomato, tasty and healthy. You have also Black Krim, it will be fun to see the comparison with photos taken when it is ready.


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

  • Posted by jim1961 6a Central Pa. (My Page) on
    Mon, Jun 23, 14 at 14:09

Thanks for info Seaweed! I'll try to locate a Heirloom tomato plant next year to try.


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RE: organic rose fertilizer

Hi Seaweed: With the exception of Early Girl and Super-sweet cherry tomatoes ... all my tomato are Heirloom varieties: 3 Black Krim, 1 Black Prince, 1 Cherokee Purple, 2 Sunsugar, 1 Pineapple, 1 Champion, 1 Seedless, 1 Celebrity (yellow), 1 Chocolate cherry ... plus others that I forget the names.

When I first grew Annie L. McDowell, it gave me lavender-blooms with acidic potting soil, plus horse manure (black & composted). Now it's pink near my limestone patio. I tried dunking in a blue-dyed solution, it was BAD-looking, so I threw the entire cluster away. But I kept Radio Times rose to show the effect of blue dye on the bloom: only the fringe changed color, very ugly:


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