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Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Posted by Strawberryhill 5a (My Page) on
Sat, Oct 5, 13 at 12:20

The most addictive scent that I sniffed at the rose parks, plus my own garden of 55+ roses is Mary Magdalene, smells like a cozy fireplace, or divine myrrh in Catholic church incense, better than frankincense:

 photo NovMary.jpg

Below is a bouquet picked October 4: Dark red is Crimson Glory (refreshing soap), peachy bud and beige are Mary Magdalene blooms: wonderful myrrh. Pink bloom is Annie L. McDowell, calming lavender and lilac scent. Peachy orange is Versigny: delightful fruity scent that rivals Golden Celebration.

What are the best scents plus disease-resistant in your garden? Thanks in advance.

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Sat, Oct 5, 13 at 12:29


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Love your bouquet of roses, so lovely & image what would smell like with such God's scented creation. You are very lucky!
Here is a group of mine, at my garden, Costa Mesa.
Double Delight as you all know, below, Koko Loco, little bud not opened, Rainbow Sorbet, bottom pink, Queen Elizabeth per owner of local nursery, but I think it could be something different, red, Oklahoma, lite Apricot, Mother of Pearl, left white, mini flora Ambiance, right white, Margaret Merrill, they were now at my passing friend Marie's grave site, she was one of the roses lover.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi Seaweed: Your Rainbow Sorbet rose at bottom is awesome ... I love bi-color. White roses like Ambiance and Margaret Merrill are great in bouquets. Oklahoma has the deep red that I like, plus famous scent. Koko Loco and Mother of Pearl rose are very unique.

How's the scent on Margaret Merrill? Thanks in advance. Below is a bush-shot of Mary Magdalene (Austin rose), best in partial shade, so the white blooms don't fry in the heat. The bush below Mary is "Marie Pavie" rose, very disease-resistant, great musk scent:

 photo bestmaryandmarie.jpg



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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

I love Honey Bouquet rose ... blooms last long in the vase, tolerates shade, perfect blooms even during last year drought at 100 degrees. After 4 days of constant rain, less than 5% of black spots (a few tiny dots), no leaf loss.

Others also report it as disease-resistant. Below is Honey Bouquet rose, pic. taken Oct. 6, with a sweet honey scent.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Honey Bouquet is just as disease-resistant as my yellow Arthur Bell floribunda, except Arthur Bell has a strong fruity scent. Below is Honey Bouquet's clean rose bush:


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Yellow Honey bouquet rose brightens up any flower vase! Below left pink rose is Francis Blaise (myrrh), left beige is Mary Magdalene (myrrh), purple-red is Stephen Big Purple. Other roses are: Evelyn, Versigny, and Golden Celebration.


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Below is the same bouquet taken Oct. 6, showing Wise Portia (mauve rose) at the bottom. It blooms in cluster of 4 to 5 blooms, so the blooms are smaller, but magnificent scent.

If I have to rank the degree of the scents that send me to heaven, it would be: Mary Magdalene, Wise Portia, Annie L. McDowell, and Evelyn. Wise Portia Austin rose smells like baby powder and myrrh, very refreshing. The bush is very disease resistant, zero BS, just a touch of mildew since it's down to 2 hours of sun (my tall house shades it in late fall).


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

after I posted the photo, knew was upside down, too late, the bottom is that famous bi-colors Double Delight, right between Oklahoma & light scent Koko Loco, the hidden tiny Rainbow Sorbet, so I now show you another real face of Rainbow Sorbet, bud looks like Mustard & Ketchup,
Margret Merrill has the sweet scent I love, And it is floribunda, re bloom is continually, it is at front yard, 12 hrs sun full of fresh air, no spry, it takes care of itself, or God take care of this one.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi Seaweed: I love that vibrant color of Rainbow Sorbet. I checked, your Costa Mesa, CA only has 11.65 inches of rain per year, compared to my 38" to 40" of rain, plus 23" of snow in Northwest Chicagoland.

You take really good care of your roses, and they look so good despite low rainfall ... no diseases on your roses either. That's a great testimony to organic ways.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Love your Honey Bouquet, so bright & cheerful,

thought you would like to see this bouquet, Tournament of rose, the front yard garden, never did anything, just let sun shine in & water & plenty of air around, this rose rewards me plenty of re blooms. here only one branch of the plant, early spring, I was so happy with so many of them & it lasts a week or longer on the stem, did not want to dead head them.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

this group of roses and 2 different colors of Passion fruit flowers as background, top big red, Liebeszauber, coffee color, Koko Loco, deep purple small, Intrigue, yellow with red eye, Eyeconic Lemonade, pink, Tournament of rose, bottom orange, Voo Doo, was happy to give them to a couple, who adore my garden.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi Seaweed: Your Tournament of Rose is so healthy, nice glossy foliage. I love your last bouquet with Passion Fruit flower, very exotic. Eyeconic Lemonade brightens my day with its yellow.

Your Red Liebeszauber bloom is huge! Intrigue blooms in cluster at the rose park, it has a good spicy scent, but came down with black spots despite the park's spraying.

I don't spray, below is Summer Samba floribunda, the bloom is large like a hybrid tea. The scent is a yummy mix of pear, clove, and floral. Summer Samba rose blooms well in partial shade, very disease-resistant:

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Wed, Oct 9, 13 at 9:54


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

How sweet this Summer Samba is with the apricot over tone,. Organic roses are safe to smell, some people are afraid to get near them, unless one is allergic to some of them, I love to smell roses every chance I get, that is the best part! Perfume is the imitation, not that exciting & not organic or natural, right?

what is the name of right bottom, light lilac color?


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Thank you Strawberryhill for your growing instruction of Mrs Wood, pink lavender Noisette, within one month, the whold plant has a brand new healthy look, dug out from the tough clay ground, I mixed half of play sand with organic soil (Gardner & BLoome ), diluted gypsum in tap water, put it in 18" pot, very happy to show off!


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi Seaweed: the lilac-cluster is wild-summer-phlox, it grows wild in the woods here. Wild-phlox blooms during the hottest summer, need partial shade & moisture but you can grow it in a pot. It has a great scent that perfumes my garden. Deer like to eat this phlox.

Your Mrs. Wood looks very healthy in Gardner & Bloome Organic Soil. I'm impressed with that brand, see link below. Here's an excerpt of G & B Eden Valley Potting Soil:

•Contains kapok seed meal, seabird guano, and sardine meal.
High coconut coir content improves drainage & moisture retention.
Crab chitin helps to naturally control fungus gnats and other soil borne pests.

**** From Straw: Below roses picked yesterday, Oct 9.

The most fragrant and disease-resistant rose in my pH 7.7 clay is Pat Austin, upper left orange, smells like ripe nectarine and mango (YUM!). Upper right beige are Mary Magdalene roses, divine myrrh scent. The big purple is Stephen Big Purple, old rose scent. Dark pink is Pink Peace, light pink is Frederic Mistral (strong perfume).

Other lesser scents are: William Shakespeare 2000, Angel Face, Liv Tyler, and Crown Princess Magareta (orange Austin rose).

Here is a link that might be useful: Gardner & Bloome Organic products


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Here is Pat Austin rose with shiny, disease-resistant foliage. It's fertilized with chicken manure plus horse manure.


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very impressive with your collection of roses, scented or not, they are very colourful, quoted from Chinese saying, my eyes are eating ice cream, in other words, it is a satisfying sensation from the beautiful colors, it uplifts my spirit, Pat Austin has the bright orange under the sun, you are raising such gorgeous roses, think about presenting them to the rose shows?


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi Seaweed: I'm too busy with my kid for rose shows. I grow roses for fragrance alone. I'm very pleased with the health & scents of these roses: Crown Princess Magareta (orange), Mirandy hybrid tea (dark red), Mary Magdalene (white), and Stephen big Purple (below mauve).

Jeffcat mentioned that Mirandy hybrid tea was the best-smelling rose among the thousands at Columbus Rose Park, Ohio. Below pic. was taken Oct 11. Roses from upper left moving across and downward are: Mirandy, Versigny, William Shakespeare 2000, Crown Princess Magareta, Sonia Rykiel, Pat Austin, Pink Peace, Bolero, Stephen Big Purple, Angel Face, and Mary Magdalene.

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Mon, Oct 14, 13 at 11:11


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Below are my two most disease-resistant roses as own-root in my alkaline clay, pH. 7.7. Zero diseases on Annie L. McDowell rose, and less than 5% black spots on Golden Celebration. Below pic. is taken Oct. 14. Annie L. McDowell blooms became bigger and darker pink, thanks to soluble sulfate of potash from Kelp4Less, free shipping.

One spray of Annie is enough to perfume the entire room with wonderful lilac/lavender scent. It lasts 4 days in the vase. Yellow Golden Celebration rose is my favorite scent: yummy cupcakes from the oven ... pure delight!


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Gee, very impressed with your Annie Laurie McDowell, lucky rose and lucky us. Thank you for sharing the tips of growing healthy roses & let roses be abundant too. It just made my day!


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi seaweed: I'm glad you like my Annie. Early spring I fertilized her with gypsum (calcium sulfate) ... Annie likes it slightly acidic, and gypsum has 17% sulfur.

But her blooms were small, so I gave Annie soluble sulfate of potash ... her blooms become bigger & darker color. She blooms in cluster of many blooms. Below is a 3" bloom of Annie L. McDowell rose:


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My most hardy roses also bloom well in cold temp. Now it's 48 degrees, will drop down to low 30's in the next few days. Here's a bouquet picked today, Oct. 17 ... with my most fragrant and disease-resistant roses: Duchess of Rohan (dark pink), Radio Times (light pink), Crown Princess Magareta (orange), Bolero (white), and Wise Portia (mauve).

Duchess of Rohan rose takes me to heaven, she leads the pack in the best scent. She has good repeat in my alkaline clay, but prefers partial shade.


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Here's another vase, picked Oct 16, that shows Duchess of Rohan, dark pink, and Golden Celebration rose (yellow). Upper purple is Old Port (slight scent), right lavender is Angel Face (great scent in cool weather). Angel Face floribunda is healthy with my alkaline clay.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Strawberry Hill, these incredibly gorgeous pictures and the descriptions just melt my heart. Unfortunately, I don't think any of them could be grown without sprays on the East Coast, certainly not in the Blue Ridge Mountains where I live. I can only dream. I, too, feel a connection with the antique organic rose growers; unfortunately, I have a small lot without room for huge shrubs that only bloom a few weeks. Thanks for your note.


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi Lainey2: It's good to hear from you. I agree that most roses in this thread are healthy ONLY in alkaline soil, such as Angel Face and Summer Samba. Months ago I tested them by throwing gypsum (17% sulfur) around, and they broke out in BS. So I had to scrape that stuff off, then topped with alkaline clay to reverse the BS.

There's an inverse relationship between calcium and potassium. That's why potassium chloride (muriate of potash in fertilizer and de-icing) is used to soften hard water high in calcium and magnesium. My heavy clay is tested exceedingly high in magnesium and barely adequate in calcium.

Some municipals add lime to tap water to deodorize. Hydrated lime is unstable, and binds with potassium, phosphorus, iron, and trace elements. Here with my tap water pH of 8, the roses that get the most tap water are the most pale and most prone to diseases. Sulfate of Potash NPK 0-0-50 helps to green-up my roses and to balance the calcium.

I googled "Acidic soil and Blue Ridge Mountains" and found this abstract, by Dept. of Biology, U of North Carolina: "The flora of the southern Blue Ridge Mountains. USA has always been associated with primarily acidic soils."

If you look at nutrient-deficiency charts, as the pH drops, the level of potassium and calcium also drop. Potassium and calcium are essential for disease-prevention. In my dolomitic & limestone clay (pH 7.7), calcium is released with rain (pH 5.6) ... so all I need to do is to add sulfate of potash for disease-prevention & better blooms.

Some roots are good in secreting acids, Wikipedia listed it as "Acid Phosphatase" of cluster-root. Romanticas and Dr. Huey are good at this. Liv Tyler, Romantica Sweet Promise, and French Meilland Firefighter all are dark-green. Evelyn is also dark-green in my alkaline clay, and don't need gypsum either.

If I apply gypsum (17% sulfur, 22% calcium) they hate that, and break out in black spot. Now I realize that those roots can extract the calcium from my limestone clay, with the acid that they secret.

In contrast, the disease-resistant roses such as Annie L. McDowell and Excellenz von Schubert are less efficient in secreting acids. I have to give them sulfur or gypsum, otherwise they are pale at my high pH. Folks in the east coast with acidic soil report these 2 roses as being healthy. Kordes rose "Deep Purple" is wimpy in my alkaline clay, but improves with gypsum.

As the soil pH drops from roots secreting acid, so will the level of potassium and calcium. Those 2 elements need to be supplied yearly, plus trace elements like iron, boron, zinc, and copper (wood ash and manure are good sources).

In his blog, a rosarian stated that roses are pale in alkaline soil, but are more prone to diseases in acidic soil. The trick is to keep the surface dry and alkaline, so fungi can't germinate. That's why I put sulfur in the planting hole for my alkaline clay at pH 7.7, but never on top.

Here is a link that might be useful: pH gradient in Southern Blue Ridge Mountains

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Thu, Oct 17, 13 at 19:05


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Wow, every time I have to take a deep breath, just look at them, God create these marvelous Roses for us, and some people have been too busy to even look and sniff! That is not the way to live life.
You have the best bouquet ever, it cheers me up in spirit, I said to myself, how I want to improve the roses in my garden, your love for roses inspires us, thank you for sharing! God must be very please with you!!!


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Hi Seaweed: Thank you for the compliment. I am very pleased with the Creator for His wonder in nature & and the beauty of the rose. Every time I sniff a rose, it's a temporary transport to heaven. The Catholic saint Teresa "the little flower" also loved roses when she was alive. When she died, many people witnessed a strong perfume of roses.

I'm excited about my roses coming this spring from Burlington nursery. Burling uses a flat-rate medium-box for shipping (around $12), so shipping cost is the same for 2 roses versus 6 roses. So I ordered 6 fragrant roses from Burlington: Oklahoma, Francis Dubreuil (Barcelona), Eitoile de Holland, Rose du Roi, and Comte de Chambord.

Oklahoma is known for its disease-resistance. It's vigorous as own-root. Dave and Deb Boyd in Montana, zone 5a, wrote in HMF: " Oklahoma is one of my favorite 5 roses. I was a fragrant red rose snob for 30+ years and Oklahoma was always one of the roses I looked for first when planting a garden. Oklahoma was pretty good in Sacramento (1968 - 1992) as long as blooms were protected from late afternoon sun.

In spring of 2004 the dogs broke a big cane off one of the Oklahoma. Deb noticed as we were going somewhere. She was disappointed. To get her laughing, I just took the cane and stuck it in the ground. I told her, "now we have another Oklahoma". That got her laughing at my silliness. I forgot about it until late August when I was cutting back the iris in that area. I started to pull the dead cane out of the ground when I noticed a bit of green at the bottom. I looked closer and there was a bit of new growth about an inch from the ground. I showed Deb and cut the dead cane away. Deb was jazzed. I thought it was interesting but knew the little critter would never survive winter. You know what is coming. I uncovered Oklahoma in spring of 2005 and saw new growth. It had 4 blooms that spring and those huge blooms on that tiny thing looked hilarious. The blooms were so big I had to prop them up. 2006 was a great year for the rascal and Oklahoma Jr is doing great own root. I have a feeling Jr will catch up with the 14 year old grafted plant next to it within a few years. There are photos at our album site:

http://65.18.154.219/digger.com/gallery/okla

Deb checks out Jr before any other rose now, even before she looks at her beloved Rio Samba.

Oklahoma is not cane hardy in zone 4/5. It starts the year 6 inches to a foot tall. Spring growth is vigorous and it quickly gets 3 to 4 feet tall. We get 30 to 35 blooms per flush on our 2 established bushes. Repeat time is average - about 6 weeks. We don't get blackspot. Oklahoma will get a touch of powdery mildew if conditions are right and I don't have time to wash them twice a week. Both of ours seem to use the iron in the soil faster than neighbors and I do have to add iron around them much more than I do most of the other roses. Fragrance is strong and one of my favorite scents. Oklahoma is usually 4 - 5 feet tall and 4 feet wide by season's end. Great rose." Dave in Montana, zone 5a.

**** From Straw: Thank you, Dave, for all the wonderful posts you wrote on forums, plus the excellent info. you gave. Below is a link to Dave and Deb garden in HMF.

Here is a link that might be useful: Garden of Dave and Deb Boyd in HMF

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Sun, Dec 1, 13 at 13:53


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

pink Camellia, with the green leaves, then, from the top, left, Royal Amethyst, Black Magic, Tournament of Roses, William Shakespeare 2000, Endeavour, next to 2 Rainbow Sorbet, next row, left, Angel Face, Fragrant Plum, Irish Crème, George Burns (stripes), Medallion (big pink), Diana Princess of Wales at the center, red Hot Cocoa, Secret, Rainbow Sorbet, bottom, red Why not Cherise and Just Joey
very happy to show you this morning's fresh cut roses, enjoy the holiday, greeting to all the rose lovers!


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RE: Fragrant, no spray & disease resistant roses

Thank you, Seaweed, for sharing your roses with all the organic rose growers. Rainbow Sorbet stole the show. Royal Amethyst is the prettiest purple shade ever!

I like my William Shakespeare 2000, as own-root it's small & compact like a mini-rose, and is disease-resistant as long as the surface of the soil is dry & alkaline. Watering roses DEEPLY only once a week helped to keep the soil-surface dry, thus less fungal germination. I notice that well-drained roses in a raised bed, have less fungal diseases than roses in poor-drainage clay, where the surface is continually wet. See W.S. 2000 rose below:

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Fri, Dec 27, 13 at 15:50


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