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Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

Posted by cuttingcollector 6 (My Page) on
Sun, May 23, 10 at 9:39

I was wondering what rose rootstocks (other then Dr. Huey and the ones listed below) there are and what their characteristics are? I know that Dr. Huey is the industry standard as far as rootstocks go, but others, such as multiflora are in some cases better suited. I currently have Dr. Huey, Rosa Multiflora, Rosa Rugosa (Multiple Types), and a unknown wild rose with leaflets of 7 and small pinkish flowers that resemble multiflora (if they root). Also, I have another rootstock for a zephirine drouhin and one Hybrid tea or grandiflora that are pre-rooted look to be the same.
Here are Characteristics of the roses that I found:
Dr. Huey: Industry Standard; used on most roses, including standards, and suckers rarely. Resistant to most diseases, except mildew, which is not transferred to the grafted plant. 10-12 feet
Rosa Multiflora: Grown from either seed or cuttings that root readily. It is hardier then most other rootstocks and can be used for weeping forms of standard trees. Viruses effect the plants easily. To about 5m (16 feet)
Rosa Fortuniana: Better in warmer areas, very resistant to nematodes. Slow to get started but catch up afterward. Suckers readily, however, they can be easily identified by the leaf difference.
Rosa Rugosa: Thorny; can be used for standard roses. Growing to 8 feet tall.
Rosa Manetii: Commonly used in California; has more flexible roots then Dr. Huey
Other Rootstocks: Rosa Cania Dog rose, Rosa laxa According to a DK book on propagation by Alan Togood (a very good book) popular and almost exclusively in the UK, and Rosa Polmeriana.

Thanks for reading and please feel add to the list and let me know if I got anything wrong.
The Cutting Collector


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

I see this post is getting old but still might be interesting. If you have Laxa it's more hardy than multiflora when that is a concern. Laxa very rarely suckers and it's a good rootstock for many modern roses like hybrid teas, floribundas and many modern shrub roses.

Rosa canina the species is hardly if ever used in commercial rose production, at least in Western Europe. The varieties used are canina hybrids close to the species and there are many of them, Pollmeriana is one. Most of these varieties are old and well known; introduced in the late 19. / early 20. century.

Pollmeriana has been in culture since 1905. Needs relatively warm temperatures to grow well, and not the best in areas with cooler summer temperatures.

Rugosa is rarely used because it gives a much weaker oculation point. For some reason the joint between the rootstock and the rose doesn't grow that well together. In field tests the number of roses that snap and break off in the bud point is the highest of all the used roostock varieties. Rosa rugosa grows better in dry and cold conditions than most rootstocks, so it's not without advantages.

One of the most commonly used caninas are canina inermis, a clone that are almost thornless, and easy to work with. It's hardy, and scores just as well as multiflora and laxa in field tests.

Nurseries use different rootstocks chosen particularly for the varieties and local conditions. Still many of the caracteristics of different rootstocks are much the same in comparison, even when the same field tests are done in north and south of Europe.

Some interesting points to notice in relation to pre hybrid tea roses, are that canina varieties and rosa rubiginosa are often prefered by the experienced propagators because they result in better plants.

In UK laxa is often used for all types of roses climber, old and new. In mainland Europe laxa doesn't do that well for all varietes.

For standards canina varieties like canina pfnders are often prefered because they give more winter hardy and longlived plants. Sometimes rugosa and multiflora is used, but the results are often considered inferior to the best varieties.

I think Canina Smiths Ideal still is considered the most winterhardy of all the roostock varieties.


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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

I see this post is getting old but still might be interesting. If you have Laxa it's more hardy than multiflora when that is a concern. Laxa very rarely suckers and it's a good rootstock for many modern roses like hybrid teas, floribundas and many modern shrub roses.

Rosa canina the species is hardly if ever used in commercial rose production, at least in Western Europe. The varieties used are canina hybrids close to the species and there are many of them, Pollmeriana is one. Most of these varieties are old and well known; introduced in the late 19. / early 20. century.

Pollmeriana has been in culture since 1905. Needs relatively warm temperatures to grow well, and not the best in areas with cooler summer temperatures.

Rugosa is rarely used because it gives a much weaker oculation point. For some reason the joint between the rootstock and the rose doesn't grow that well together. In field tests the number of roses that snap and break off in the bud point is the highest of all the used roostock varieties. Rosa rugosa grows better in dry and cold conditions than most rootstocks, so it's not without advantages.

One of the most commonly used caninas are canina inermis, a clone that are almost thornless, and easy to work with. It's hardy, and scores just as well as multiflora and laxa in field tests.

Nurseries use different rootstocks chosen particularly for the varieties and local conditions. Still many of the caracteristics of different rootstocks are much the same in comparison, even when the same field tests are done in north and south of Europe.

Some interesting points to notice in relation to pre hybrid tea roses, are that canina varieties and rosa rubiginosa are often prefered by the experienced propagators because they result in better plants.

In UK laxa is often used for all types of roses climber, old and new. In mainland Europe laxa doesn't do that well for all varietes.

For standards canina varieties like canina pfnders are often prefered because they give more winter hardy and longlived plants. Sometimes rugosa and multiflora is used, but the results are often considered inferior to the best varieties.

I think Canina Smiths Ideal still is considered the most winterhardy of all the roostock varieties.


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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

Thanks for the reply I really appreciate it I was starting to get a little concerned that I wouldn't get any. I being in America would've had great difficulty finding even half that!
Yikes! Rogosa roses I don't think I'll try as a root stock. I don't want to wake up one morning and have a broken rose especially a rose tree!
Thanks again
The CuttingCollector


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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

Pink Cloud was used by Ralph Moore (I believe that is the correct name?) Love the screen name by the way!
Regards,
Andrew


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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

Pink Cloud the climber? I suppose any hardy rose would be worth trying, but the safest would be the tried and tested varieties. I have read rosa canina varieties are prefered for standards because the canes grow much older that multiflora. As a plant multiflora grows very old, but the wood is renewed at a faster rate. A god cane from rosa canina can easily become 40-60 years old, and the main stems live as long as the plant, over 100 years sometimes.


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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

I don't think I've heard of pink cloud though I did a search and found pictures. By the looks of it, some would have a hard time using it as a rootstock without keeping at least one as plant. I think taoseeker your right that almost any hardy rose can be used. I had thought that New Dawn might make a good rootstock. Some roses by Radler might also make good rootstocks, as I believe all his roses are own root.
Thanks,
The Cuttingcollector


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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

cuttingcollector would you be intersted in supplying me with a few rooted cuttings of the rootstock plants. Maybe 2 or 3 of each. I am trying to get my own rootstock plants into the ground. I think I lost my dr. huey. I would be willing to work something out with you when the roses I have are established enough and send some varieties back to you. Thanks. Danny

Here is a link that might be useful: White Oak Way Nursery


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RE: Rose Rootstocks and characteristics

Danny, sorry I haven't been on in a while to check for any replies(Which is just about when I get one...). I'd like to help but, I too, ended up losing most of the stock I had mentioned including Dr Huey... So I am unable to really send any. One plus is that I wouldn't have any place for them anyhow. I believe part of my problem other then it being dry was the rooting environment,Aka. Shed. (I moved them in side after starting out side)had little air circulation, as well as the soil which was dirt/compost with 30? percent sand. Another was in loam (the multiflora) which stayed nice for around 2 months or more before dying. Though I work at a nursery I don�t do propagation [I work on Saturdays (During the week I do school and sometimes landscape, one of the many reasons why its good to be home schooled.) in the shrubs/roses kinda more outdoors(with my Grandpa), moving plants around in the growing areas and other things for my bosses (It is owned by a father and his son), and Watering in addition to dead heading, landscape management, and cleaning up plants on my own]though if I asked I�m sure they would let me. So everything that I know is pretty much from trial and error. Since then I�ve moved more outdoors and added more sand up to 50% (I got a trick for measuring that put your rooting media thourghly mixed in a glass Jar, add water, cap, and Shake allow to settle measure. Because of the difference in weight the sand settles to the bottom or the perlite rises to the top. Measure your soil in the bucket and calculate the percentage of sand then you can calculate amount you need to add.). Also my methods are stone age, my rooting powder is pretty sweet, though, as Honey is natures natural sweetener after all. Though I�ve improved since then I've not done enough assessing to work all the bugs and get good rates of success. The multiflora rose I want to get more cuttings from soon.
Sorry Again,
The Cutting Collector


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