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wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

Posted by tnmom66 none (My Page) on
Fri, May 24, 13 at 15:19

I have killed several of the $3 bagged rose plants. I am trying again with a Therese Bugnet that I got this year from Big Lots.

I paid $8 last year for a Mister Lincoln rose at Sam's that was bare root but it has done AMAZINGLY WELL and it has grown and bloomed very vigorously. I looked this year for another variety, but either Sam's didn't have roses, or I missed them.

I would love to propagate or share cuttings from my Mister Lincoln and I would love to have a "cabbage rose" cutting or rooted cutting.

My daughter's father is Turkish and her Turkish grandmother makes rose petal jam and as best as I can tell, she uses some variety of a cabbage rose. I don't imagine she could ship me a rose plant from Turkey, so I am looking for a reasonable substitution.

Thanks in advance!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

Aldi had Mr Lincoln and other good varieties of bare-root hybrid teas, #1 grade bare -root roses for $5, at the BEGINNING of the season, while Lowes had them potted for $5 late. I bought a Double delight, Queen Elizabeth, and Peace rose, and all are doing well....But then I realized what I should have gotten was old antique and heritage roses, that take much less care, and often are more fragrant, and are better for herbal glycerites and jams that I hope to use them for. Richter's lists and sells roses that are traditionally used for jams and perfume oil, and ones used for hips... Dog rose, damask roses, and rosa rugosas may also be what she is used to in Turkey....25% of ALL rose species are native to TURKEY! ;-)


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

I've made rose petal jam from an assortment of gallicas over the years. Darker petals definitely look nicer.


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

wow. Thanks for the Richter's referral!


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

I have one rooted cutting of Mr. Lincoln! I have tried many times to start a new plant from a cutting, and I am glad to have finally got one, but I don't know what I did differently???

I am looking into Gallica roses. Had not heard of them before.


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

Update...I made some great jam from Mr. Lincoln. My Therese Bugnet rose grew a LOT and is looking pretty. Did not get any flowers from it. I got 2 "body bag" roses, 1.5 grade from Tyler nursery at Big Lots Feb. 4. $3.75. Got a Marchesa Bocella and a Reine de Violettes...I soaked them in water, left them outside, they froze, I potted them up when they thawed and they are showing new growth. They had growth in the store, but I broke it off. We had some super cold weather. If it gets in the single digits again, I will probably cover them. Looks like there may be some dieback, but I hope they will do as well as the Therese Bugnet. I am planting them in a much sunnier location, so hopefully they will bloom. My Mr. Lincoln bloomed nicely the first year I planted it! My little cutting I rooted from Mr. Lincoln is showing new growth, too...they are all just having little buds...not a lot of leaves or anything. My budget does not allow me to get some of the fancy roses I see online.


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

I love making rose jelly. After trying with several different roses I have found that my angel face rose makes the best tasting jelly. Some times I throw in a few of some different Austin roses with that too.


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

  • Posted by luxrosa s.f. bay area, calif (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 7, 14 at 15:42

I collect old roses,
'Cabbage' roses are listed under the class name Centifolia, which translates to "100 leaves" What we now call a petal was long ago called a "leaf".
hortico.com sells Centifolia Muscosa, which is the original Cabbage Rose. it has been grown since the 1700's, and probably earlier. It produces one bloom cycle each year, here it blooms in June.
This is the exquisite pink rose that is used in making jams and preserves in India, among other places. It has a distinct scent, with a high note that reminds me of an expensive rose cologne. There is no other rose like it, plus it has pretty foliage. I'd grow an entire row of them if I had room.

A re-blooming Old Garden Rose that I've grown, that has petals that taste good in jams and jellies is called:
'Rose de Rescht', a rose from the 1800's, which Richters sells. This red rose has a typical Damask rose scent, the scent one expects when one smells a modern red rose. It also dries well for potpourri.

Best wishes,
Luxrosa


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

  • Posted by luxrosa s.f bay area, califo (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 7, 14 at 15:51

P.S. another Old Rose I grow from the 1800's that has fragrant petals that are good for making jams and potpourri is
'Compte de Chambord'. It is a beautiful rosebush with bright pink roses and pretty foliage. It is a small bush and grows to be c. 4 feet tall.
Re-bloom is very good and it blooms profusely.
Where I live it blooms in spring, summer and the autumn.
pickeringnurseries.com in Canada sells it, and they ship to the United States.
Lux.


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

I have been running an experiment for at least 5 years now with various roses, jams and rose-flavored sugars. You will get distinct and recognizably different tastes from damask roses (I primarily use Autumn Damask (rich damask pink) petals versus some of the myrrh-scented Austins such as Troilus (cream), which can be a beast to get to take in your garden, but grows prolifically in ours, so I am able to harvest the petals. I also have had great luck and flavor from Frederic Mistral (soft pink) which has a rich fragrance as well as Baron Girard d l'ain (vibrant red-burgundy) and tea roses which yield a fruity and sometimes spicy flavor (this year I used Monsieur Tillier)


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

GenevaJ, I hope this isn't too off-topic but I wonder if you would share your recipe for rose petal jam? I have seen some recipes online but, frankly, they didn't look 'right' to me. I have a very prolific David Austin climbing 'St. Swithun' which has a lovely myrrh fragrance and I think it might make lovely jam …

Many thanks
Tricia


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

  • Posted by Tessiess 9b, SoCal Inland, 12 (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 24, 14 at 16:51

There is a staff member at the Huntington Botanical Gardens in California who has written a book (as yet unpublished as far as I know) about using roses in making desserts. She has used the roses to make rose water as well as using the petals in cookies or other goodies. Her name is Judy Polinsky (sp?). I went to rose events where Judy served many of these desserts (they were DELICIOUS) and happened to ask a bunch of questions about which roses were in what, which roses tasted good, which bad, etc. She told me they had tested at least 2,000 varieties of roses the Huntington grew to see which were the best. I don't remember all the info she shared. I keep hoping that her book will come out. You could call or email the Huntington to see how to contact her for more information.

One of the desserts I liked best were cookies made with rose petals, yum! Judy told me the petals were from the Austin rose William Shakespeare 2000.

There is also some information on Help Me Find Roses about a man in Germany who liked rose hip jam and how he raised a bunch of roses in order to select ones to make the jam. Some of his roses have been or are in the process of being imported to the US by Angel Gardens in Florida.

Melissa

Here is a link that might be useful: George Ruf and rose hip jam


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RE: wanting a fragrant cabbage rose for jam

  • Posted by Tessiess 9b, SoCal Inland, 12 (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 24, 14 at 17:32

There is a staff member at the Huntington Botanical Gardens in California who has written a book (as yet unpublished as far as I know) about using roses in making desserts. She has used the roses to make rose water as well as using the petals in cookies or other goodies. Her name is Judy Polinsky (sp?). I went to rose events where Judy served many of these desserts (they were DELICIOUS) and happened to ask a bunch of questions about which roses were in what, which roses tasted good, which bad, etc. She told me they had tested at least 2,000 varieties of roses the Huntington grew to see which were the best. I don't remember all the info she shared. I keep hoping that her book will come out. You could call or email the Huntington to see how to contact her for more information.

One of the desserts I liked best were cookies made with rose petals, yum! Judy told me the petals were from the Austin rose William Shakespeare 2000.

There is also some information on Help Me Find Roses about a man in Germany who liked rose hip jam and how he raised a bunch of roses in order to select ones to make the jam. Some of his roses have been or are in the process of being imported to the US by Angel Gardens in Florida.

Melissa

Here is a link that might be useful: George Ruf and rose hip jam


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