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Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

Posted by mike_in_new_orleans 9a/ coastal LA (My Page) on
Wed, Jul 26, 06 at 22:27

I have never successfully budded or grafted anything. Rooting cuttings is so easy that I just haven't given the other much effort. But I've been getting curious. I've had roses on a few different rootstocks and tried once to bud 3 or 4 buds onto Dr. Huey sucker growth that I had rooted. None of the buds took. I probably didn't use clean and sharp enough tools. I don't know. But I know from the few fortuniana-grafted roses I've had that the root system gets HUGE. A very impressive rootstock all around.

But...I grow all my roses in pots, and "huge" root systems have their drawbacks in pots. Since some folks insist that certain rose varieties just will never grow as well on their own roots, I was wondering if its worth trying another kind of rootstock.

I have been thinking specifically about trying it on Archduke Charles or Cramoisi Superieur. The reason is that both these roses were recommended as among the very few varieties that can stand up extremely well and indefinitely to root-eating nematodes. They are bushy and fibrous and grow faster than the nematodes can eat them. But they're not as enormous as Fortuniana. Does it sound worth the effort? Has anyone here ever given this sort of experiment a try.

My biggest hesitation is that I simply am inexperienced with budding and grafting. (I'm not even sure I understand extactly what sets grafting apart.) Any thoughts on this question are welcome. Thanks.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

Heideroslein is a very easy rose to root. I have thought the very same method. In fact, early hybridizers of the 18th century used wild roses as an understock. Try it!!


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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

I've thought about budding on to Caldwell Pink because of its thick, fibrous root system, its ease of rooting, and its general health and vigor. I don't know how vulnerable it is to nematodes, but it's darned near bullet proof as far as anything it has to face around here goes. I haven't gotten around to trying it, though, or any other rootstock, for that matter. It's hard to get enthused about budding when so few of the roses I've rooted have failed to do well on their own roots.


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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

Rosyone,
Dr. Malcome Manners also lists Caldwell Pink among the handful of roses that do well on their own roots in Florida. I don't know that rose, but it sounds like you have the same idea as I do.

I just need to learn how to graft properly. I tried once (4 plants) with no success. I had easily rooted 4 Dr. Huey stems from some sucker growth I had cut off, but I failed at the T-cut budding method.
I'd actually like to try the V-cut grafting method. But inertia is working against me. I also don't yet have my own Archduke Charles plant, though I do have Cramoisi Superieur. I think fear of another failure after investing time to root the stocks is what's keeping me.


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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

I've though about rooting roses onto Swamp Rose . It might be able to withstand lack of drainage.Last fall I budded onto Fort. for the first time. I rooted some cuttings and then budded them very sloppily. They grew. I also just did stentlings. I think thats what you call it when you bud a stick and then root it and it heals and roots at the same time. They grew also, but not all, and I have never done this before. Some of the failure buds turned black , but the stems are still growing so I can try again. Did I mention that I took a long time to do this,not the fast and furious quick experienced type of budding. No misting system yet , just 2 litre coke bottles on qt. pots. in short sun times.


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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

Yeah, pretty much the same idea, Mike. I was thinking about budding Eugene de Beauharnais for a patio pot and it occurred to me that a vigorous, pot friendly descendent of R. multiflora might make a good rootstock for it. The only other own-root rose I have that really needs to be on a rootstock is Gloire de Dijon, and Fortuniana is the obvious choice for that one. It would be going in the ground and I want it to be BIG. Before I acquired Fortuniana I thought about trying Crepuscule. I don't know what its mature root system looks like, but it has to be massive to support the world class monster I see above the ground.


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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

I am by no means inclined to attempt grafting, but if I did I would first propagate cuttings from this one. I don't know what the rootstock is; it is suckered from a grafted Queen Elizabeth that died back years ago.

This is one vigorous, healthy, no-care, disease-resistant, drought-resistant rose, now about ten feet tall, seems like a climber or rambler, but the Queen Elizabeth grafted to it was just a nice bush-type rose. I have whacked this thing down to the ground and it just comes back stronger than ever, don't have the heart to dig it up.

This is one of my photos I happen to like for a flower shot since I don't have a macro lens.


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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

That's Dr. Huey.


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RE: Anyone like to use Unusual rootstocks?

Aha! The guy who mows my lawn mentioned Dr. Huey, he wasn't sure what mine or Dr. Huey was exactly, but I'd never heard of it (except here) and didn't know what it looked like. Just when I was asking myself why did I post that, now I'm glad I did!

Thank you.

I can't imagine grafting roses, will be lucky to root some cuttings, but better hang onto that one just in case.


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