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Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Posted by grandmothers_rose z6 VA (My Page) on
Sun, Jul 3, 11 at 22:52

You all have gotta try this. I am a rank amateur and I have cuttings from OGR's to HT's well callused after two weeks. I'm going to plant them this weekend. The next trick is to find a good place outside in hot and humid VA weather for them to grow on.

Roseseek, you ROCK!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Thank you, but it wasn't my idea originally, as I state on my blog. I just massaged the idea to fit my conditions. Now, please, as you find successes in YOUR climate, please post the results with the prevailing conditions so others can use all of it as a guide to figure out what may work for them. Thank you! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I used cuttings that looked healthy, even if they had a bit of blackspot. I figured I was removing the leaves anyway so it might be ok. I also made sure I had heel wood at the bottom of the cuttings and carefully scored the end. Dipped them in 8 year old roottone. I took two whole sheets of newspaper and soaked them and rolled them dry with my rolling pin. I rolled 6-10 cuttings up like a burrito in each set of newspapers, covered each burrito with a Wal-Mart bag, tied it, put a rubberband loosely around it, and chucked it like a log into a 2 gallon solid-colored plastic container in my unheated or cooled basement. We've had temps in the 80's to 90's with nights usually in the 60's. Two weeks later, bingo! Nicely callused cuttings.

Here is a link that might be useful: roseseek's newspaper wrapped cuttings


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I believe the heel works as well as it does because of the increased number of growth buds and the greater amount of cambium tissue exposed. It's the cambium which calluses, differentiates and forms roots. Oddly, I've scarified (exposed more cambium) cuttings using the method and it didn't result in greater callusing. Only the cut ends formed the tissue. They still worked, though.

Thank you for describing your conditions and how you did it. Seems some folks appear to think things like this are difficult. Showing what you did and how it wasn't brain surgery should help convince them it's EASY and it WORKS! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

One more detail, I used cuttings with spent blooms, not hardwood.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Connie at Hartwood roses has pictures of callused cuttings that look very similar to mine.
I visited her garden/nursery recently and loved it! She is very easy to talk to and gives great advice!

Here is a link that might be useful: Callused cuttings at Hartwood


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I think I'm going to give this a try.I have lots of roses to take cuttings from.My thoughts though are where will I find a dark cooler place to store them.No garage or basement here.I'll have to experiment!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Debbie, any room in your vegetable crisper? How about a fridge in the garage? Some have them and they can easily be pressed into service...Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Here are the results of the cuttings wrapped in the newspapers for three weeks. None had roots. They are listed in order of largest, ah, callus:

unknown HT from a friend - very well callused
Rose de Rescht - about half were callused, half dead
Bella Donna - 1 year old stem. The top inch was dark brown but quite healthy when I cut it off.
Oklahoma - ok
Sunsprite - just a little bit of callus. I planted them anyway.
Bella Donna - cuttings with spent flowers were just black twigs.

I potted them in 16 oz styrofoam cups with half perlite and half spagnum moss. I'm not going to cover them because I think we have plenty of humidity here in VA.

I wondered rather belatedly how to keep them from blowing over. Duct tape and an open weave market tray are my solution. I am open to a more elegant design, though.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I could use the vegetable crisper.I didn't realize they needed to be that cool!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Please let us know what happens! I have a friend who was interested in the newspaper idea but does not have a basement. I'll suggest the vegetable crisper to her tomorrow.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Debbie, they don't HAVE to be that cool, but they do best if well under 70 degrees F. They may, or may not, I don't know as I haven't tried it yet, take longer than in the sixty range. But, if that's all you can do this time of year, by all means, try it! What do you really have to lose? Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Ok,I've got the cuttings gathered this morning and I am going to give it a try.I have no problems rooting roses late fall through the first of March using the soil method and covering them.It would be good to root them year round.I wonder if this would work on those harder to root shrubs.I'm going to put a couple of sweet almond verbena cuttings in there to just to see what happens.I'll go back and read over the instructions again before starting.Thanks!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Great Debbie! Please keep track of all you do and photograph your successes to share here. It's going to be very interesting learning what all types of plants this method may work on! Can't wait! Kim


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I am new to this method, I have mine in a dining room hutch but my home is A/C to 70 so I hope it works (the rose is a STRONG rugosa that grows thru anything now so fingers crossed) One more week to go and I will share with the group. Darn Canada with sad weather, we have to take what we can get up here but I will keep on it (I have to, both of my parents have golden thumbs soooo....yeah)


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I had a messy cutting of an unidentified, beautiful dark pink old rambler- it had a fair amount of blackspot, so i stripped the leaves and cut them into decent sections for cuttings- ending up with 5. I dipped them in hormone, wrapped in damp newspaper, tied it up in a plastic bag and tossed them underneath a Rhododendron shrub for some nice shade. Then i forgot about them! This morning they had callouses and 4 of them were already sending out roots. I potted them up and put them in a morning sun location. Awesome! I probably left them there for 3 weeks or so.

Anyone tried the crisper yet? That sounds like a great way to make sure the slugs dont cuddle up with my tender rose cuttings (which they did).


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I have 8 varieties with 5-10 cuttings each in the crisper right now. 2 weeks will be up on Friday July 22. I will post an update when I get to open them up. Hopefully it will be with great success....I used Dip'N Grow for mine....


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Ok, Well I peeked. I realised I forgot the rooting hormone. I have three cuttings all from differant hardy plants, all about 3-4 days apart. Two weeks is up in two days on the first one. They all look ok. A little rot at the top of one but they have no trace of rot at the bottom. They all look pretty good but no bulging callused ends yet. So what do you all think? When the time is up should I still pot them up? do they sound like they have a chance? I am getting excited because they have no rot at the bottom and I know rot on cuttings from three years of failure (One success in all that time and the darn cat ate it!)


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Well after 2 weeks I have checked the cuttings that I placed in the crisper and so far there is no change. The cuttings are still green but no roots or calluses. I am unsure whether to leave them in the crisper or remove them to some place a little warmer. I guess only time will tell unless some of you have a suggestion to try.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Iam wanting to try this method but have a few questions.I have a bunch of different rose bushes ,if I was to take a few cuttings where would be the best location to take the cutting?New wood,just below a bud?Btw,I bought my girlfriend some long stemmed roses awhile back.When the roses started to die off I chopped a few stems,put rooting compound on them and stuck them in a sand/perlite/peat moss mixture.Put them in a container that was in a plastic bag for about three weeks and have two that are growing!Iam saying it was pure luck but they are growing!!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Ok, the first cutting looked ok after 2 weeks but with no callusing. I potted it and it rotted. So I left the other cuttings longer and now have callusing on all but 2 (those two rotted) The two with callusing were done without rooting hormone and I left them in the dark for about 3 weeks. SUCCESS! I will be potting them this weekend. I have to say, I never thought it would work for me because I had NO success with cuttings for three years but believe me when I say this method ROCKS! THANK YOU! XOXOXOXOX


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Woody, the wrapping method works best with harder wood with all the foliage removed. The stem below the one which just bore a flower is probably about right. Many people seem to get better luck with a "heel", where you cut a side branch off leaving a bit of the branch it came from still attached. You may also lightly scrape off some of the bark, exposing the cambium layer (circulatory system) as that is what calluses and forms roots. I haven't found that beneficial for this method, but it shouldn't hurt and your mileage WILL vary.

Are your florist roses still growing? Often, they will break into growth them collapse as they are using the nutrients stored in the wood without forming roots. If you want to try cut flowers, it's best to buy as fresh as you can find and use them for cuttings immediately, sacrificing the stems for propagation instead of cut flower use.

Dreamrosered, congratulations! You're on your way! Experimenting with what variations work best for you, in your climate and circumstances is what this is all about! Not every exact step is useful for every situation. This is what I mean by "your mileage will vary". You might try a liquid rooting hormone to see if that speeds things along and improves your success rate. I've found here, leaving them longer than two weeks in the dark, cool, hasn't helped. They might have formed larger calluses, but they didn't push any further. I'm finding, also, with the extreme heat we're having, I can callus them, but not carry them further. It's just TOO hot and TOO dry for them, yet still too humid for cover as they rot. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by seil z6 MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 4, 11 at 21:59

Well jeepers! I'm going to have to try this since to date I've had spotty at best luck with rooting anything!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I will have to look around for some Liquid rooting hormone. I have the powder stuff and it works great on everything else, just not my roses. We have had major rain this spring with bad flooding, then crazy heat and just miserable humidity. I wonder if I potted them and let them sit under a grow light till the heat breaks. Any suggestions? (I have a great grow light and I am home all day so i can mist my heart out)


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Can you plant the cuttings so two-thirds to three-quarters of the stems are under ground? Use a well drained yet moisture retentive potting soil, plant them deeply and put them where they will receive filtered light. Not direct sun, bright, indirect or strongly filtered sun so the exposed green stems can create chlorophyll but not cook or dry out. Keep them moist as you would any potted plant and hope for the best.

I don't know what to suggest about the grow lights and indoor misting. I've never had success with that method. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I have my little survivors hiding behind my Morden Blush and JP. So far so good, Only dappled light and I am checking them a few times a day to be safe with moisture. So far so good.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Congratulations dreamrosered! Keeping my fingers crossed for you! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I am so glad everyone is having success with the newspaper method! I am happy to report that the Oklahoma cuttings all survived, have grown new leaves and appear to be firmly rooted in their styrofoam cups. So, 6 weeks later I have 8 little bitty Oklahoma plants. (Now, what do I DO with all of them? If it's not one problem it's another . . ) I believe these grew with my absolutely minimal care because the cuttings had little leaves growing when I took them out of the newspapers. To my novice eye that was the only difference.

The other cuttings,Bella Donna, Sunsprite, an unknown HT, and Rose de Rescht, appeared to have adequate calluses, but were unable to survive my "care." I just plopped them in the dirt in styrofoam cups, moved them to some dappled sun and let them go. Next year I will cover my callused cuttings with pop bottles. I expect I will have more success. Guess there really is a reason everyone else in Z6 VA uses the clear pop bottles . . . I learned from my experiment and am rarin' to grow again next year.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

grandmothers_rose, that's great! Congratulations! Keep practicing over winter. This method does appear best with harder wood that's even semi dormant, so wrapping them in early winter should give you even better successes. The weather is far more conducive then to bringing them past the callus stage, so you should have great success then getting the more difficult ones to take. I'm happy it's made it easier for you so far and look forward to your next "problem" of finding good homes for the Bella Donna, Sunsprite and Rose de Rescht babies you create! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

My success with wrapping cuttings in newspaper is spotty at best. As I reported on my blog yesterday evening, all of the cuttings of 'Pink Pillar' that callused so nicely in June soon died one by one after they were planted and put on my mist propagation bench.

I put in a new set of cuttings, this time from 'Comtesse Riza du Parc', a Tea, and five of six cuttings callused (the other one rotted). I have potted them up and they are on my mist bench right now. We'll see how they do.

Photo of the cuttings, and a lovely portrait of Comtesse Riza, in the blog post linked below.

Here is a link that might be useful: Comtesse Riza cuttings


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Connie, it appears the wrapping method is best with dormant or semi dormant wood and when temperatures are significantly lower than what most of us are experiencing currently. Even my success rate took quite a nose dive. My gut tells me it is likely a two issue situation. It's as if the softer wood, or even older wood gathered right now, may not have efficient nutrients stored to carry them through the rooting process. That collected in winter or coming out of winter may have more reserves to permit them greater development time until they root.

I also believe the heat not only stresses them more than they are when things are cooler and moister (cold humidity is easier on the cutting than hot humidity as the cold slows the urge to leaf out, flower and use up any stored food), permitting them to continue their development, but also might enable pathogens such as Downey to enter the equation. It may not specifically be Downey Mildew, but I do notice more spotting of the canes of the cuttings now that I didn't see when it was colder. it almost seems like the results of Fire Blight after cool, then hot humidity. Currently, there are between thirty and forty degree higher daytime temperatures here depending on which day you measure and that surely has to figure into the mix.

Some of the results I've seen here and in photos, remind me of what Syl Arena experienced that year with what everyone called, "The Creeping Black Death" with his bare roots. He surmised it was due to winter being too mild and the plants not storing sufficient resources to break dormancy when expected. Instead, they just started turning black until they were completely dead. It resembles what I've seen and what I experienced here.

I'm not giving up on the method by any means as it has permitted me to root things here I'd never been able to before. I think, at least here and from what I'm hearing from those who contact me directly with questions and status reports, that it's probably a better idea to use it in winter (where suitable) and into spring as long as the optimal type of material is available and the temperatures remain lower. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Anyone from Florida trying this method with some success? I'll try it myself as all other methods previously were hit or miss and a very low success rate this time of year in August, maybe less than 5% success when highs are 95 consistently and lows in upper 70's low 80s.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

aaargh, I only just changed over from hardwood cuttings to using clear PVC bottles and semi-ripe cuttings last year. Last year, I rooted 7 out of 10 while this year, having tweaked the method a little, I have 16 out of 18. Even so, it has to be tried so I have wrapped half a dozen stems, leaving them in an outside cupboard (cool and dark). Fingers crossed.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Roseseek, thanks for the encouragement, though I've had enough growing for the summer. About December I get the urge again, when the new seed catalogs come out. My friends will think I'm even more wacky than usual when I ask for cuttings in December. This will definitely contribute to my image as the mad gardener off on another adventure!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're welcome! Too funny! Grandmothers_rose, you and I are related! LOL! I don't blame you. This time of year, I just want things to take care of themselves. Once it's cooler and there's more energy to experiment, I'm off on more exploration! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Rosegeek, have you tried the wrapped "Burritos" in the refrigerator crisper yet? I'd like to know if this specifically works before putting 20-30 cuttings in the moist newspaper burritos inside a ziplock and trying this.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

mmmm Rosegeek? very good. Well I have a few wrapped stems - started just last week. This method seems sort of like accelerated hardwood cuttings, a method I always use for blackcurrants, flowering shrubs and....roses. Because I usually just trench the hardwood cuttings at the side of my allotment, the outcome can be spotty because I generally ignore them till the following autumn (I forgot they were there and actually strimmed them one year). I would expect callusing to be fairly straight-forward but the aftercare is what is likely (for me) to really affect success. Probably, the best thing will be that the stems will be transplanted into pots where I can keep an eye on them. I fear I have killed more hopeful plantlets by tugging at them to see if they have struck and getting the light/shade/humidity quotas right - but, if I get to observe them every day, they put up a valiant fight and can be revived from drooping with a timely plastic bottle or blowing into a polythene bag (I reckon they get a nice blast of CO2 as well). This year, I have used the bottom of the bottle as a pot in the hope that rooting will be visible instead of my ungentle yanking. Only in retrospect does the obvious look like the obvious but you still feel a bit of a dimwit.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

No, I haven't used the vegetable crisper to callus. I received questions about cuttings turning black in the paper and was assured it wasn't too wet. The temperatures were much higher than what I was having success with, so I suggested they try the crisper. So far, it appears those temps my be a bit too low as the cuttings haven't callused but have remained fresh, like produce does.

The temps I've had best success callusing in have been in the sixties, from sixty to high sixties. Once they climb into the seventies, more turn black. From reports, significantly below the sixties and they stay green but don't callus.

I haven't put more up also because with the temps we're having now where I am, it's much harder to carry them on after callusing. I'm waiting to do more when my work room gets back down into the temperature range I've had success with.

I've kept it all up to date on the blog. Feel free to read! Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: pushingtheroseenvelope blog


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

This uncredible method seduced me, too, and I tried it on july, 27. But then - I forgot them!! Now I opend the bags and, yes, it worked successfully! I am very happy about this result, but now? what have I to do?? All have callous, but only three have roots. If I have to choose I would put them all now in their pots, even those which have only callous, because some of them present dark points, and I think they need to be at the air.
What would you do in my place? And the exposure - outdoors in the shade? or indoors in the greenhouse?
Any advice will be welcome! :)

Happy greetings
Tamararly


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

It seems time for you to pot them up! If you have a bright green house where you can keep them watered and prevent them from burning in the hot sun, that may work well. If you have somewhere they will get bright, filtered light outdoors and remain watered and not fry, that can work, too. Much depends upon where you are and what the conditions are where you put them. You want them to get the moisture (including to the wood itself) they need to carry them on while they root, but not enough to rot them. You also want bright enough light to allow them to photosynthesize food for themselves with all the green parts they have (including wood) but not fry due to direct, hot sun and low humidity. Because you're living in it, you are the best judge as to where to put them to provide those types of conditions.

I'm happy you've been successful with them this time of year! Here, it's just been too hot for it, so I'm waiting until fall or winter, when I KNOW it works and my chances of carrying them past the wrapping stage improve dramatically. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Thank you very much, Roseseek!
It was my very first try with this method and my worry was, that the wrapped cuttings stayed in their bag inside in a cool room. And therefore I didn't know if they accept now the air outside or not. Usually I did my cuttings in a shade place in my garden, without any protection. And there they stay until next spring. Now, it is different with the abrupt change of indoors into outdoors. But, all in all, as they have nice buds, it is certainly the best time to take them in the garden.
I had never success in overwintering rose cuttings in my greenhouse, or just 1%! So, yes, they will go outdoors!

@campanula: what kind of others flower bushes you are doing with this method?

Tamararly


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Tamararly, you're correct. There is a huge difference between the close wrapped environment and outdoors (even in a greenhouse). They have to be hardened off. That's why I planted my cuttings deeply so only the very tops were outside the damp, cool soil. Once the root balls formed and there was new growth from the exposed buds, I raised them higher in the pots. Simple, really...tilt the soil out, fill in under the root ball and slip it back in the pot, or cup. There will be soil above the rim of the pot which is easily pulled away from the stem of the plant without disturbing the roots. By this time, the plant is actively growing and there is little to no shock from uncovering the stems.

It's also wonderful to plant from the wrappings into pots when it rains. That is PERFECT for hardening them off in a day or two as the high humidity and constant bath of water permits them to adjust very quickly. I loved timing the unwrapping with a good rain. It's also the easiest to transplant just before a good rain. The plants seem to never know they were moved. Kim


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Yes, Kim, you are so right! And today, actually we have a fine misty rain - that's all what I need!! :) And I am so happy to learn that by such a weather the rose cuttings can harden in only two days! Thank you once more!

Tamararly


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're welcome! I'm jealous! We're hot with some monsoonal humidity up from Mexico. Not really great for anything other than perspiring! Please have your radar on "high" while you do this and report back with your observations. Good luck! Kim


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Yes, for sure, you'll hear again from me! It is so exciting!
I hope you will be soon out of your sauna. :)

Greetings
Tamararly


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

exactly 2 weeks after wrapping the stems, they are nicely callused (I assume because my eyesight leaves a lot to be desired) What is quite clear though, are the fat white incipient roots, emerging pretty much all along the stem - growths which would have been stem initiation sites have now changed to root nodes - as is the wont of stem cells. Carrying the hardwood rooting method through, I have just buried the stems, leaving the top quarter above the soil. I am now convinced that this method is the exact same principle as hardwood rooting, but just on an accelerated rate - because of the much higher soil temperatures, meristemmatic growth is faster. It remains to be seen what eventual level of success I have - with the longterm hardwood rooting method, success rates varied between 25-70% and depended on whether there was enough energy in the cut stem to enable the plant to come through a long winter. What do you do with the rooted cuttings Kim? I would generally grow them on, moving to a larger pot in spring and transplanting into the ground the following autumn - much the same as hardwood cuttings which I simply left until autumn when I would uproot and then transplant into a permanent position. So, both methods follow the same timescale for me - just wondering whether you would transplant this next spring or wait till autumn?


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Hi Suzan! I also pot the cuttings deeply to minimize frying them in less humidity and higher light and heat levels. Once they begin growth and roots have begun filling the bottoms of the 16 oz foam cups, I replant them in the same cups, only lifting the root zone higher to permit them to continue growing downward and filling the cup again.

As they outgrow the cups, I'll upsize them to gallon cans, then two gallons, then fives, unless I find homes for them or donate them to the rose society I support for their sales. The ones I've propagated for myself, usually go into the ground at the two gallon size. I found on this hill, they develop better without having to break out of the larger root ball. Setting them out as two gallon plants seems to permit them to push roots faster and farther than the larger cans do.

To me, the remarkable thing about the wrapping method is it has permitted me to get cuttings to actually root and grow. Before beginning using it, my success rate here in this far more humid climate was 100% failure. I had learned what to do in the previous, much more arid climate. Nothing I found to do to tweak it resulted in success. This does. I don't expect it to produce identical results everywhere, but it has already shown its benefits with many people who, like my more recent failures, hadn't hit upon the right combination to permit them success. I'm glad! Kim


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This thread seems a bit interesting. I guess I must give a try to newspaper wrapping. Thanks for sharing such an informative post.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're welcome Barbarajon! Please share what you're experiences with it are so you can add to the combined knowledge. Having many people working along parallel lines on the same project is exciting! I'm eager to read of your results. Thank you! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

um, well there is a fair bit of dieback at the tops of the exposed canes (which I have cut off). I am going to move these cuttings somewhere a bit less visible since I tend to poke and probe. I always had the best results with hardwood cuttings when left alone, undisturbed by me, for the entire winter.
Having said that, this summer has been absolutely perfect for rooting semi-ripe cuttings - not too hot, no extremes of temperature, resulting in 90% success rates - up from the usual 50-60%. I now have 37 roses which will need rehoming (not to mention the 20 or so on order) - luckily, my son lives in a housing co-op with plenty of grounds - he volunteers to run the gardening committee (more or less single-handed) so we will be adding many more roses over the next year or so.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

So, last week I repaired a mistake. As I told you, I tried this wrapping method with newspaper for the first time. My example was a very long stem of an unknown rambler which I cut into several cuttings, about ten or so. I brought them all together in the newspaper but about three weeks, they were a little dried and without any callus, but not damaged. That was clearly a mistake, and so, last week, I covered one by one in the newspaper, put them again in the zip-bag and waited for today. Yes, not all but two of them did callus and even a little beginning of roots!
It's really a great and easy method which works! I am so happy about it! Thank you very much for sharing this wrapping method! :))
Tamararly


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Congratulations Tamararly! It can require a bit of tweaking to get it adjusted for your conditions and perhaps type of rose, but it has a lot going for it. Thanks to the gentleman who initially put it on the Rose Hybridizers Association forum and Paul Barden who expanded it to the point it clicked on for me! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Sadly the 35 or so newspaper burritos all came up with the green stems showing dehydrated stems and no callusing or roots. I started them the 28th or 29th of Aug. Checked them last week and they are all dried up. Some got black but most stayed green but a dull dehydrated green. I followed the instructions by the letter as in wringing out the newspaper very well then wrapping the stems into a newspaper burrito. Then after a few of the burritos are wrapped in slightly damp newspaper they get placed in a plastic bag to retain the humidity. Granted I kept them in a fairly dark area of the house and it was mid 70s. I had 5 bags full of burritos and none of them made it. I was surprised the stems dried out completely as the newspaper still had some moisture but it had dried from 3 weeks before when I first stowed them away.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!






What did I do incorrectly here? The pics made the canes actually look greener and healthier than they looked in person. Notice the striated lines designating the dehyrated cane tissue.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

First, you have to remove all the foliage using this method. Leaves will rot too easily and they will draw moisture from the cuttings. It's their job to transpire water into the air to draw it up the cane from the roots. Don't leave any leaves and cut off any soft, sappy growth as they are too actively growing and are more likely to rot if wrapping is appropriate for callusing. It's best to use semi dormant to dormant wood and completely enclosing it in the damp paper before sealing them in plastic.

If the paper dried while wrapped, there was a leak which allowed moisture to escape from the wrapping. You can see in your photos the paper is dry, which leads me to believe that though you put them away damp, they leaked during the three weeks. Think of wrapped leftovers in the fridge, if it's sealed tightly, no air or moisture escapes. If there are openings, moisture will escape and the paper and cuttings will dry out. I'm quite anal about making sure they are wrapped tightly to prevent drying out. I've enclosed them in multiple bags, placing the burrito in one and tying it, then enclosing it in another and tying it to make sure they are sealed against drying out.

The temps may not have been low enough. My best successes are between sixty and almost seventy. Higher temperatures haven't worked as well here, both for holding the burritos as well as planting them out in much hotter weather. Callusing worked best at the lower end of the sixties range, but still worked approaching the low seventies. Successfully carrying them on got increasingly more difficult as the temps rose into the eighties and was impossible in the nineties and above. Kim

I'd say yours dried out due to a breach in the moisture barrier and desiccated instead of callusing. I don't know how successful they would have callused at that temperature had they not dried out. As I've written, until my work room remains in the sixties constantly and the outdoor temps don't go over eighty, I'm holding off trying any propagation here as it just hasn't been as successful as I expect from the effort. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Ok roseseek, I tried this again today. Used wetter newspaper wrung out,. Took all the foliage off and used multiple plastic bags tied off the end. I made 3 bags worth or 25-30 cuttings. It is in a 72 degree air conditioned garage. This should be more successful for certain. We shallk see in 2-3 weeks.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I hope it is, but I've not had great luck with that high temps. I'm waiting for it to drop about ten degrees less than your garage, which it will very shortly. We had days of nineties here this week. It's to be about twenty degrees lower next week, so the work room should be almost right. We'll see. Good luck! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Ive too tried the newspaper method,got one out of six to callus.I planted it,because I saw leaves growing,which are still growing or atleast looks green and healthy.But,there are no roots growing,I lifted the stem,I know I shouldn't have but wanted to km=now if there was roots.I have it in a pot on my windowsill in my house.My question is,if theres still no roots what can I do to encourage root development now.
BTw I started a cutting from a long stemmed rose that I bought for my girlfriend and have a full bloomed rose on it now!!!lol


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Keep your cutting moist, shaded, and don't mess with it. If the portion of the stem below the soil is green, you still have the potential for it to produce roots.

Connie


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I tried several batches of the burrito wrapped cuttings in October and November. The October batch I had 5 that were callused. I planted them outside which is was 60s/70s a month ago during a cold snap in FL here. 1 is still survuving but it's got some black streaks in the green bark so probably a mold/fungus due to being sealed in a plastic bag airtight for several weeks. Most everything else was growing white fuzzies on black stems when removed 2-3 weeks from the plastic bags.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

As a follow up, my Oklahoma cuttings are leafing out. With much in-ing and out-ing (aka schlepping) from my screened in porch they have survived the winter. I am amazed and cautiously proud. I continue to watch the lows daily and move them to the porch if the lows are below 30 with a clear sky.

This weekend or the next I'm going to take some cuttings from my garden, carefully remove the new leaves and burrito (is that a verb?) them. I think the general temps are still too low for the burrito method, but the leaves are coming and, well, I'm just gonna DO IT!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

If you're already getting new leaves, the temps are not too low for wrapping cuttings. You want the wood which IS NOT producing new foliage as that is breaking dormancy and using the stored nutrients, reducing its ability to maintain itself when wrapped.

It's been a very difficult year here for wrapping because we haven't really had winter yet. When there is little rain and nights don't generally go much below fifty, with days reaching nearly ninety, the blamed things are pushing growth and beginning to flower early. Yet, I've run three batches of wraps through with excellent results.

As you said, just DO IT. Us the wood you may have which isn't pushing leaves and new growth yet as it will contain more food, allowing it to feed itself while wrapped, forming the new tissues it needs and break into roots and growth better once planted. Good luck! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I thought February was not a leafing out time, but I was mistaken. I just checked two roses on my way out the door and they have elongated buds along the entire stem, but no leaves. I'll get on the burritos this weekend. Timing is everything. The only way to get the reward is to do the work. I mean, really, who needs a clean house anyway?


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Only we think along calendar lines. The rest of Nature does it the old fashioned way, by the sun and weather. Your usual February isn't leaf out time, but this one is. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by vettin z6b Northern VA (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 18, 12 at 9:40

Interested in seeing if you have an update pls. Did you use the spagnum moss and perlite again?


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Here are my knock out cutting that I did with out rooting hormone for 2 1/2 weeks

Wrapped cuttings as a burrito

you really cant see the calousing but its sorta there but small

Wrapped cuttings as a burrito
Wrapped cuttings as a burrito


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're definitely on your way with them! I don't know if the level of callus after that amount of time is due to temperature, type of hormone or the particular variety you're trying to root, could by any or all. Trying the identical methods with other varieties and keeping track of any changes (temperature increases/decreases, time of year, etc.) will help you develop the feel for what will work and when it should. Congratulations! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

i have others downstairs that I am doing started monday with 4 different kinds one is a queen elizabeth and the others are unknowns so I think I might plant them in pots instead of going outside after words. We had a lot of rain so I figured that there would be plenty of humidty but I just came back in from putting 2 liter pop bottles on them they look a little bad....


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Kim do you think I should with this batch Im doing now is to plant them in pots and keep them in the basement or should I bring them upstairs... or...

Jessica


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

That's a hard call to make by remote control, Jessica. How terrible is it outside? I've done all of mine out doors in a few hours of direct sun every day with temps ranging from the sixties to nearly ninety and most have succeeded. Some varieties are just pigs about rooting. I did them specifically to see if the method worked and for them, it does not, but neither does any one elses methods for these They just don't root easily and have to be experimented with more to determine what is best with them.

If it's very dry or freezing, you might want to do these where you can provide more humidity and prevent them from freezing. If you're potting them, they'll definitely require light. Do you have lights set up in the basement? How hot and dry is it upstairs? What feels more like "greenhouse conditions"? Think spring-like as you experience when your roses begin breaking dormancy after pruning. Is there anywhere you can approximate those conditions? That would be the best place for them. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Its not terrible out at all for the past couple of days its been 80-83 degrees out. Inside upstairs we have the temp set at 70-73 and dry but the basement is cool I would say 60's ish, we do have windows ground level and I was thinking I could slide a table or make a bench of some sort and put the cuttings there so they can get light. The windows are facing south and the sun beats down on that side of the house.

You have tried this rose and didn't do good...?

We in central ohio got alot of rain last week beginning of this week so water is no problem here.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

They're going to be better off in the long run outside where your chances of them drying out because the house air isn't as humid, are lower. Higher humidity will also help to prevent spider mites longer. Balance that with your ability to keep them in bright, filtered light, or limiting their exposure to direct sun to just a few morning hours. Even then, the best is bright, filtered morning sun in temps as high as you're having right now.

If they get direct sun through a south facing window, it's going to be much hotter for them than the filtered sun outside because of the air humidity, cooling effects of shade and air movement. Glass can focus the light rays, causing them to burn more easily and it heats up the air around the window hotter than the rest of the room feels. Think about difficulties you may have experienced with house plants too close to hot windows. Same thing.

If they're outside where they'll get rained on pretty regularly, use a lighter soil and bury them deeply in the pots so a quarter to a third of the cutting is out in the light and air. We haven't had that much rain and the winds have been dry, so I've had to use a moisture control soil for best results. I picked up Supersoil because it was half the cost of the moisture control and I have to water them every two days when hot, dry and windy. Those in the moisture control hold four to five days between waterings. With your higher humidity and any rains you receive, you'd probably need a lighter, less moisture holding soil to prevent them from rotting.

No, I've not grown that rose, nor tried to root it, but not all roses root the same, nor are all roses as successful grown own root. Gardens of the World, Mary Rose and Morey's Pink rooted 100%. Rainbow (striped sport of Papa Gontier) and Maytime (Buck), failed 100%. I put in three cuttings of Mint Julep which all callused, have remained green and are putting out small growth buds, but haven't formed any roots yet. Some of the results could easily be due to the condition of the material when wrapped. Much of it is likely due to the genetics of the roses and their ability to callus, root and grow unassisted by more vigorous roots. Many roses WILL root, but not all, and not all will grow well on their own roots. Unless that information has been reported by those who have experienced it, the only way to know is to try for yourself. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Thanks Kim!


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're welcome Jessica! Good luck with them. If they don't cooperate, don't give up. Try what you've done with other roses which are known to be easy to root to stack the deck in your favor. Once you're comfortable rooting the no brainers, branch out and try some which are known to be a bit more difficult so you can easily tweak your method for the best results. Try parallel runs with some in the basement, some upstairs and some outside as I've suggested so you can determine what works best in your conditions.

Perhaps this method may permit you to propagate when using bottles or bags won't so you'll be able to begin your cuttings earlier, then move on to the bottle method once the weather and material are better suited for them? Utilizing multiple methods can permit you to propagate nearly year round so you can successfully add roses from anywhere, pretty much any time of year to your garden. Kind of fun thinking about that, isn't it? Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by vettin z6b Northern VA (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 22, 12 at 21:51

Calluses! Starting on some cuttings from a week and a half ago. Now let us see if I kill them by fussing over them too much when planting


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Congratulations, Vettin! Here is an example of what CAN happen with two weeks wrapped. You are probably going to find some which do NOTHING in two weeks, then you'll find the ones like these! The variety is Ralph Moore's breeder, 0-47-19, Wichurana X Floradora. You know how tenacious Dr. Huey is and that is only about one-eighth Wichurana. This is half Wichurana, which explains why it has responded this way to begin wrapped. Kim

0-47-19 two weeks wrapped (1)

0-47-19 two weeks wrapped (2)


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by vettin z6b Northern VA (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 22, 12 at 22:56

Wow, that is a rose that wants grow and multiply!
Thank you for sharing the 12.5x dip n grow. The second batch was much better than the first, I think I burned the first with too strong a solution.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I just looked at my Knock out cuttings that I wrapped for 2 1/2 weeks then I put them outside stuck them in the ground and cut the bottom of a 2 liter pop bottle and kept it on there and I have more calousing and one that has a root!! YAY

Photobucket


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're welcome vettin! I had a pleasant surprise yesterday when I unwrapped Schmidt's Smooth Yellow.

Jessica, I hope that wasn't one of the cuttings you'd had planted under the bottle. Disturbing them to check progress can cause them to fail. You'd be better off planting them in foam or clear plastic cups with drainage holes so you can tip out the root balls. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Schmidt's Smooth Yellow


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Well what I was going to do was throw them away because they weren't doing anything.. I had some buds on it but they died so I have more cuttings that I am going to plant so I carefully dug the dirt that was in front so I could see if they were doing anything and well they were lol and the last one I did had a root. Anyways I had to find a Gatorade bottle cuz I couldn't use the ones that are taken. I dug another hole put some loose dirt in it about an 1 inch and I put the rest of the dirt back in watered it and stuck the bottle on. I hope I didn't kill it..


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by vettin z6b Northern VA (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 29, 12 at 21:52

Congratulaions Kim! I am itching to look at the cuttings I planted to see if they have roots. We had a freeze watch a couple of nights ago. Hoping that did not do them in.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Ok this is an unknown rose cuttings that my neighbor let me get and this has been amazing and look already after a week :)

Photobucket

Photobucket

I do keep a pop bottle over it to keep it humid


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by vettin z6b Northern VA (My Page) on
    Sun, Apr 8, 12 at 2:49

Impatience won out, and I emptied the pots when I could not see any progress and most of the cuttings looked dry. Most of them were dried out. One was pushing roots nicely. That is one more than I have managed before, so I will keep trying. Others may have been successful if left alone longer but I doubt it since the callus was no longer visible.
Next time will make shorter cuttings and keep a closer eye on the weather to see if I need a terrarium method. Humid northern va has been anything but, with temperatures from the 80s to freeze warnings, a couple of foggy days but mostly dry weather with fire condition warnings. The roses have never looked better.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hi Everyone

I am familiar with the routine of plant cuttings and seedlings as I do a lot. But I have this one yellow rose which is like the everready bunny it just will not quit. I dont know the name of it but its not a knockout rose and the roses are about 3inches. So I have tried the normal cuttings under a dome from it and everyone rotted. So in my search for other possibilities I ran across your newspaper wrap method and thought I would give it a try .

So I have about 3 or 4 burritos wrapped tightly in the plastic bags and they are in my garage and covered . I also scraped the bark near the bottom of the stems and used some rooting hormone. I removed all folliage and scraped the bark near the bottoms. We are expecting freezes tonight and tomorrow but it will stay at least in mid 40s in the garage. But it is supposed to warmup by friday I think and the temps out there will also rise. So Im not sure what temps these guys need . Once it warms up into the 70s or warmer will I need to have them in a crisper or just in the house somewhere. I have faith this will work If they are in the proper temp so maybe someone can let me know what they think.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Steve, you may want to start at the beginning and read all the posts about wrapping cuttings. It will answer all of the questions you've asked and it includes many photographs. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Wrapping Cuttings on Pushing The Rose Envelope Blog


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a quick adjustment

After reading many of the posts I quickly removed my cuttings from the garage after two days as its 45-55 out there. I usually keep most of my house in the 60s except for my computer room which is shut off from the rest of the house. Its going to heat back up outside so I will need to adjust accordingly.

Also it appears later in the year might be a better time to be trying this because of temps and I may try a new batch toward the end of summer.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Steve, the wrapping method only works with dormant wood. If the plant is sprouting new growth, if it's pushing flower buds, this is not the method to use. There are other methods for soft wood cuttings utilizing bottles, baggies, etc. which are suitable for those.

Dormant wood is that which has over wintered and contains higher levels of stored nutrients, ready for spring when they'll use those nutrients to break dormancy and start into growth and flowering. Much of this type of material is what you prune off in the spring before new growth starts. From my own experiences and those of several others who have either commented on the blog or who have contacted me directly, if new growth has started, the cuttings fail. According to those who have tried it, if you try flowering stems, they will fail.

Toward the end of winter through spring seems the best time with the most suitable material to wrap. Summer growth is actively growing and doesn't contain the necessary stored nutrients for wrapping. You will have better chances of success using the bottle or baggie method for that type of material. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Because of this one ambitious yellow rosebush which [I dont know the name of but it is not a knockout]Im determined and hoping to get some cuttings of . Besides the newspaper wrapped I stepped this up and took some what would be called softwood cuttings and put them in their own greenhouse effect. I have them dated and unless they rot out I will leave them till they do show something.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

If you could post some photos, perhaps we might be able to identify it for you, making it easier to obtain. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

It would be a bummer to me if what I have turns out to be the type that is difficult or impossible to propagate. Here are a few shots of the bush is question. Ok I said it was not a knockout at least it wasnt labeled knockout. The plant does not deadhead itself. The largest ones are at least 3".

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Photobucket

Photobucket


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hi,

just two weeks ago I tried once more with other cuttings, because this method is really the best I ever saw. And so, my new cuttings start to make little roots. Have I to wait that the roots are longer like on roseseek's photo from march 22,12 or can they be in their beginning?
And secondly I want to know what I shall do with those stems where the roots are done on all the long of the stem? Would you cut it in several smaller cuttings and pot them individually? Because if I am potting such a branche, the first roots will be in the ground and the others will certainly dry out , no? What shall I do?
Thank you very much for your advices! :)

tamararly


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Congratulations, Tamaraly! I guess it's still working for you because of your colder climate. Here, where many areas (mine included) are quite hot, the method is out of season.

No, you don't have to wait until the roots are really long. As long as you have good callus, and, hopefully, some roots, it's probably safe to pot them up. Just plant them deeply as shown in the photos and keep them properly watered.

With those which have rooted all along the cane, you probably can cut them up into smaller cuttings and plant them. The potential difficulty with that is the only growth bud in that type of cutting is likely to be where it is rooted, so it may take longer for them to develop new canes. What you might consider, if possible, is to plant lengths of stem horizontally, like a bamboo root, laying on its side just under the soil surface. The roots will grow downward and you're likely to get new growth shooting upward from each bunch of roots. Once that occurs, you can probably sever them between the shoots and have individually rooted laterals. Perhaps, you need to shorten those cuttings into appropriate lengths to fit the pots you have, then plant them on their sides to continue growing as if you had layered a longer cane, perhaps of a rambler or ground cover type. I hope that makes sense! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hi, Kim!

Thank you so much! That's exactly at what I thought, too, but haven't been able to explain it so correctly like you! :)
Yes, with one I'll try to plant it horizontally, we'll see, if it works.

And as you said it, it would be better to plant them now, this will not damages their very delicate first roots.

Otherwise I read all your pain about your experiments from the last year. I am sad for you, but the mine didn't do for this horrible winter, too. I don't loss all but 2/3. They stayed outdoors, in shade, and just covered with much leaf mulch. So, perhaps for the next winter, I have to take them indoors but in a cold frame or unheated room?
For the moment I do not touch at the failed ones, because sometimes, they can sprout out later from the base - I hope so!

This method is so spectacular that I'd continue to do experiences with it, even, when they'll be some failures.

Many thanks once more, Kim! :)

tamararly


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hi Tamararly, thank you! I "stole" this method from the Rose Hybridizers Association and Paul Barden's blog. The gentleman in Australia who first brought it to our attention, obtained it from an Australian nurseryman who wraps and precalluses his Fortuniana rootstock before striking them in the fields. He only lets them form callus, no roots, because he just shoves them in the ground. If they have roots, they will be broken off by doing what he does with them. If he does that on a commercial scale and it works efficiently for him, it's a sure bet it should work for us!

Thank you for your sympathy over my failures. I can't imagine having to deal with your cold weather! I'd bet putting them in a cold frame would probably work very well there and be quite a bit easier than planting them in pots indoors where they would require a lot more attention.

Good luck! I think you'll like how planting them on their sides should work for you! Thanks, again, Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hi roseseek,I visited that link ,http://pushingtheroseenvelope.blogspot.ca/2011/05/wrapping-cuttings.html
and am amazed at your results. I have tried the burrito method quite a few times with no success.I think I got a few to callus but no roots what s ever.I just got some more cuttings from a florist and tried again.I cut below where a leave was,removed the leaves,cut on angle,scraped the sides,dipped in hormone,wrapped in moist paper and sealed in zip lock bag and place in my dark cool crawl space under house. Did I miss anything? I tried to comment on that page but couldn't probably cause I don't know how to blog,lol.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hi Woody, you may have had difficulty commenting on the blog because I set it to "moderated", which requires approval before a comment is published. There is some idiot who continues to spam the blog and Blogspot.com doesn't do anything with the reports. I'm sorry for the inconvenience. It didn't notify me there was anything waiting.

If you've been wrapping florist roses, there are a number of issues which may prevent success. Many florist roses don't root easily nor grow well own root. If the florist stock was 'stale', if it had been cut too long, it could have already begun deteriorating, preventing it from rooting. It's also possible they may have been treated to prevent them from propagating. There is an old report about a famed exhibitor always treating his exhibition roses with Round Up so they'd last for the rose show, but never root nor bud when the blooms were "purloined". It's common for the winning exhibit to disappear so someone can propagate it in hopes of creating another "iron winner".

Other than these possibilities, if the paper was too wet the cuttings will rot. If the material is pushing too much, they won't callus. If the temperatures are too cold, they don't callus nor root, but will usually store freshly. Too hot and they break into growth without callusing.

If you got callus, and the variety will root, then they should develop roots if left in pots long enough. I find it is extremely beneficial to plant the cuttings deeply. If they're six inches long, you want to plant them at least four and a half to five inches deep until you see new growth from the tops and roots at the bottoms. Keeping them cool, dark and damp by planting them deep in sufficiently sized pots prevents them from drying out, and prevents the warmth from the air and sun from stimulating them to grow new leaves until the calluses further form roots. Callus is the precursor to roots.

My first batch of wraps this year were held too cold and didn't callus nor root. I potted them deeply as I normally would and they are rooting. The second batch were held warmer than the first, but still chillier than optimum. They callused but didn't root. The third batch were held about 68 degrees and they callused very well. I have two more batches holding on the bed in the guest bedroom now and will put another in there tomorrow. All of those removed from the wraps are all out front, planted at least two-thirds their length under soil and very few are showing any reluctance to succeed.

It's 80 degrees, rather dry and windy here right now, but there are freeze warnings and rain forecast for next week. Keeping them planted deeply in the foam cups helps them survive the heat and dry wind until more roots form. Once they do, I'll replant them in the same foam cups, but raise the roots to where they should be, instead of nearly as the bottoms of the cups so they can continue developing until they fill the cups with roots.

You MAY, or may not, get roots by the end of the two weeks in the wraps. Level of paper dampness, temperature, condition of the cuttings, specific variety, etc., can all affect how much success you'll have with each batch. I'm glad you're not giving up! You'll hit on the right combination to succeed. Good luck! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Thanks Kim,and I will keep trying,lol. Iam going to check temp in my crawl space later to see what it is. Its obviously winter up here and was wondering is there a better time of the yr to try cuttings or it doesn't matter? Also what did you mean by ,
" If the material is pushing too much, they won't callus"? Also what do I have to do to be able to comment on your blog cause its interesting stuff?


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

This method is most successful with as dormant material as possible. You don't want new leaves developing from the growth buds. That is called "pushing" as they are pushing new growth. The ideal condition is after the coldest part of winter and before the warmer weather begins so the cuttings are not trying to grow new leaves yet. In my climate, that begins in late December. When spring is colder, wetter and longer, that can last to as late as May. This year, it's almost over now in mid February. It's warm enough that many roses are starting to leaf out. Of course the particular variety and micro climate can affect whether the cuttings are sufficiently dormant. In the sunnier spots here, they are growing. In shadier or drier spots, they haven't started producing new foliage yet. For cuttings either developing foliage or with foliage already, there are other methods to root them. I don't deal with those as there are plenty of others who find those methods successful and have documented them on line. This is the most successful method for me, where I live, so I share it in case it helps others to succeed.

Thank you! I'm glad you're enjoying the posts and find the information interesting. To comment on the blog, you have to subscribe and sign in with one of the methods suggested (Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, etc.) As long as you use the method with which you subscribed, you should be able to comment. Your comment won't immediately appear. The system should them alert me there is a comment so I can log in and either approve it, or delete it. I don't like having to set it this way, but I also don't like having to go through what's required to delete comments containing links to or referring you to pay sites. Hope it helps. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

thanks for info Kim,another quick question for you,I have a few cuttings with leaves that I want to put in soil and put in zip bags.I am going to put rooting hormone and snip most of the leaves of just leaving a couple.I bought some real good soil(shultz prmium) and some perlite,what ratio would you suggest for the mixture of soil/perlite? I 've had moderate sucess with this method before and want to try this time of yr to see what happens.Also going to but small florescent light for them.What do you think?


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're welcome Woody! When I rooted things in bags in my old, much more arid environment, I used both peat pellets and seed starter mix. Previously, I'd used an in ground cold frame with native soil and commercial planting mix, about 50/50 ratio, all three with good success. What I'd worry about with potting soil is it remaining too wet, causing the cuttings to mold/rot and the soil souring.

When I used the peat pellets, I hydrated them, then squeezed them out until they were damp, prepared the cuttings, inserted them in the peat pellets and sealed then in ziploc bags. I used peat pots with damp seed starter mix instead of the peat pellets later when I couldn't find the pellets easily and they worked OK, too.

Depending upon how "soggy" your potting soil remains, you may benefit from using half and half soil and perlite. You want it uniformly damp, while providing good soil oxygen. You also want it to be able to be firmed in well after striking because the better the cutting to soil contact is, the better they root.

When I first learned to root cuttings at The Huntington Library as a volunteer, their method was to fill the pots with the coarse builders sand and perlite (50/50 mix), gently firm it by hand then poking holes with a pencil in which to slip the cuttings, then firm them in by hand. I found through experimentation that slamming the pots on the table to compress the mix harder, then using the cutting itself to create the planting hole when I jammed that sucker into the pot, my percentage of takes rose dramatically. The firmer they stood in the pots, the faster and better they rooted. I've also found the harder I firm the callused cuttings into the foam cups, the better they're rooting using the wraps. So, I wouldn't use enough perlite to make the mix too light and loose to be able to firmly secure the cuttings in the pots. I hope that makes sense!

I'm sorry I can't make any suggestions about the type or size of light. I've never had any success rooting anything under lights in the house. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

thanks


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I'm going to try these methods. We are moving from arid desert to less arid, and I love my roses! My greatest problem at the new house (between two currently) is gophers and voles!

If I can get cuttings to root, I will definitely put those rooted babies into gopher baskets with hardware cloth around the exposed tops for protection from the voles!

I'm a good fig and grape cutting rooter, so I hope the same holds for roses!

Thanks for the thread and the advice!

Suzi


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

It works! Two weeks ago I wrapped these cuttings in well squeezed out wet newspaper, wrapped in a plastic grocery bag. Six of eight have callused, two have expanding buds. The variety is William Baffin.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

This one is L.D. Braithwaite. :-)


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by beth NorCA 9 (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 29, 13 at 14:23

Ok, I just read over all this again, and Kim, I see you keep saying this method only works with DORMANT cuttings. Well, I just posted pics and my excitement about having success with florist rose cuttings. They obviously are not dormant. I had success with 18 out of 24 callousing. I did use a liquid rooting hormone on them, and don't know if that might make a difference? And if I'm not mistaken, one of the stems had a tiny leaf growth off one of the budeyes when I wrapped it. I didn't check, but that one might've been one of the 6 that didn't make it.

Anyhow, you can see that it does work with non-dormant cuttings. To be perfectly honest, I was kind of skeptical. I half expected to unroll the newspaper to find dead rotted pieces. But to my surprise and excitement, there they were.... nicely calloused and budding out! Now I just have to wait and see if they root. I potted them in plastic cups with drain holes, and put them in a starter tray with a clear plastic dome over them. They're sitting on my back patio where they get mostly shade, but some light does come thru. I'll leave them alone for awhile, but will of course check now and then to be sure they aren't rotting or to see if growth is occurring.


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Congratulations, Beth! As with anything horiticultural, there are going to be many mitigating circumstances. Your climate is wetter and cooler than mine here. You used florist roses which had been held under cooler, dimmer conditions than my garden roses I've wrapped. There are genetic differences between successful garden and successful florist roses which enable them to flourish in significantly different conditions. Some cross over, but not all. Any one of these, as well as potentially unknown other variables can greatly affect results with any pruning, fertilizing, rooting, etc. I'm glad it has worked easily and well for you. Your report aids in the gathering of knowledge and provides more "food for thought" about what the various conditions and other variables have possible effects on the method.

I haven't attempted florist types, primarily because I haven't encountered any which I had room for, nor couldn't live without. I've concentrated on garden roses I have either collected from friends' or my own gardens, and the results I have reported have remained constant for my conditions and the types I have explored. Your results very well illustrate the importance of what I have stated all along...you need to experiment with this (and EVERYTHING else) to determine what works for you, where you are, with the roses you grow, and figure out what tweaks you need to make should you encounter reduced success. Nothing works identically in every place, in all conditions and at every time of the year. Thanks for adding to the knowledge base. Congratulations, again, and good luck! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

  • Posted by beth NorCA 9 (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 29, 13 at 17:04

Thanks Kim! I'm hoping to try some more florist roses as soon as I find ones I really like. Plus, I really ought to try propagating some of my many rare and hard-to-find roses to keep them alive as well. This is such an easy way to get them started. I've rooted many cuttings over the yrs, but had way more failures than successes with the covered pot methods. Kinda hit and miss. If I have good luck with more of the florist roses, then it'll be way more hit than miss (I hope).


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

You're welcome Beth! Definitely, PLEASE replicate your more hard to find roses. The rose (and gardening in general) market is contracting terribly. We've all seen how restricted the selection has become and it is sure to worsen. Trades and society shows are going to increasingly become the main method of keeping these things around as long as possible. Plus, it is flat out FUN to have something so easy, be so successful, isn't it? Thanks. Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I've just read ALL the posts in this thread but would like to clarify a couple of things ….

A girlfriend of mine tried the 'burrito' method a few weeks ago and was very excited to see that, after a couple of weeks, the cuttings she had taken had calloused. Neither of us was sure what to do next so she decided to wrap them up again and hope that roots would grow.

Do I understand correctly that the cuttings should be planted BEFORE any roots appear - when there are just the calluses?

If that's the case, I assume that she should plant them immediately? Problem is that it's quite hot here now (temperatures around 30C - 86F degrees).

I know Kim says this method works best with dormant wood, however, my friend used cuttings she'd taken in June but still didn't have a problem getting the calluses.

IIRC her cuttings were long (i.e. maybe 12 inches) - if they should now be planted in a clear plastic cup should she cut them down to, say, 6 inches, and then bury 4 inches in the cup? Also, what is the recommended soil or mixture to use to plant into the cup?

Many thanks
Tricia


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Apparently, there are variables which cultivar, climate and weather can cause to vary quite a bit.

1. I've not encountered anyone nor any rose which succeeded well when left wrapped more than three weeks. It appears the longer you leave them wrapped the more stored resources they use up and the lower the chances they will continue rooting and grow.

2. Some will root amazingly well IN the wraps. Many will callus but form no roots. Some will not callus or root. The best chances of success in my experience and in the experiences of those who have shared them with me are from those cuttings removed from the wraps at the end of the initial two week period and planted.

3. It is possible your friend's cuttings callused because of their length. Longer pieces of material should contain greater amounts of resources. It is possible shorter lengths may not have callused because of lower levels of resources they contain. Personally, I would wrap the twelve inch pieces as I have shown on my blog in the "Longer Wrapped Cuttings for Standard Stocks", and plant them as show and explained in that (and subsequent posts concerning longer whips) post.

I suggest wrapping them as standards, demonstrated in the thread above, because planting them ten inches deep so only the top two or so inches remain above soil is going to be a problem for most of us. Ideally these are handled in pots. It would require a five gallon can (or larger) to accommodate each longer, twelve inch whip. That's a lot of soil, room and weight. Wrapping them as suggested will allow them to be planted in individual one gallon cans. It is helpful to stake each one at this time to assist them in not wobbling, inhibiting root formation.

4. I question whether the longer cuttings will continue callusing and rooting if they are cut down. Removing the extra length will also remove the resources those lengths contain. They may be being used as warehouses for the nutrition those cuttings are using to progress to the state they have attained.

Once they are planted, they should be kept in filtered light or indirect light where they do not receive direct sun if at all possible. If she were planting them in January, they could probably endure quite a bit of direct sun, but at this time of year, my best successes with propagation is with limiting the amount of direct sun as much as possible. The cuttings which have rooted now are pushed well under the under hanging foliage of other plants where they get strong light, no direct sun, and tremendous transpiration, high humidity, from the moisture released from the surrounding plants.

If your friend can place the pots among other plants to shield and shade them while she continues keeping them watered, perhaps they will continue rooting.

What soil to use depends upon what works where she is. Here, it MUST be moisture control so it remains wet without rotting. Other types dry out too quickly in the weather we're experiencing here, now (high nineties). Just over the ridge from here is the beach, where it fogs regularly and most mornings actually appear as if it has rained, the dew is so heavy. Moisture control is inappropriate for that area because it often stays too wet. What type remains damp without souring where she is? That is what I would use. Good luck! Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Longer Wraps for Standard Stocks


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hello Kim, thank you for such a prompt and detailed response! I think we will probably have to look on this exercise as a 'learning experience' ! I will try to break the news gently that it's improbable the roses will succeed after having been wrapped up for more than three weeks.

My friend has had success lately with cuttings she took last September (in the conventional way) of a lovely yellow climbing rose that turns out to be Alister Stella Gray :-) She now has two very healthy plants already covered with a multitude of blooms. Also another climber, with small (3cm) apricot coloured, quilled blooms that I have no hope of identifying. She doesn't remember where she took the cutting so I can't check out what the parent looks like :-(

We live in the country in Umbria (not far from Perugia) in Italy so there isn't much choice in terms of soil - potting mix etc. Generally, we mix some of our local soil (heavy clay) with lots of river sand and a bit of potting mix and strike cuttings in that.

Thank you for the link - I'll suggest to her that she persevere to see whether any of the cutting take.

I will keep you updated …

Cheers
Tricia


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

I'm attaching a photo of the unwrapped rose cuttings. We estimated that the cuttings were taken about a month ago and my friend says that the calluses looked 'better' a week ago than they do now. She's going to pot them up, even though I told her that there was very little chance of their becoming plants.

If a miracle occurs - I'll let you know.

Tricia


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

She should either pot or plant them. If she plants them in the soil, they should be set deeply as shorter ones would be in pots. If potted, wrapping their above ground lengths as I documented on my blog will help prevent them from being dried out before roots are formed. I'm not surprised the calluses aren't white and fresh as they were a month ago. At this point, they honestly are "produce". How long can you store cauliflower in the refrigerator before it begins deteriorating? I'm not saying they CAN'T succeed. Conditions vary so greatly from one location to the next, virtually anything is possible. Heck, she obtained calluses on them this time of year with material which traditionally hasn't worked for me under similar time and conditions. I'm simply saying the longer she waits, the lower the chances. Good luck! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hi Kim,

I just thought you might like to know that, quite against the odds, one of my friend's cuttings that had been wrapped for far too long in the newspaper did succeed after being planted up in a pot. All the others died, which was to be expected, given the circumstances. They were all the same rose, a Kordes Hybrid Tea called 'Perfect Moment'.

I'm attaching a shot of it taken this morning.

We've both taken a trip to our local old cemetery last week and taken cuttings, wrapped them in damp newspaper and sealed them in ziplock bags. I've put mine in our plant room (which is unheated - the temperature range here now is 7 - 15 degrees (Celsius) so I would estimate the plant room is about 13 or 14 without very much variation at all. There are no windows in it so it's dark. I will check the cuttings in a couple of weeks and hope to find calluses.

If I'm lucky and there are calluses I'm thinking I should pot up into 2.5 litre pots with my usual one-third potting mix and two-thirds sand and leave the cuttings to overwinter outside in a protected spot. I leave here at the beginning of December and don't return until the beginning of March so the cuttings will have to fend for themselves.

Two years ago I took cuttings using the 'conventional' method at this time of year and left the outside. I didn't have a very high success rate (four cuttings survived out of perhaps fifteen or sixteen). However, I do now have four lovely roses that I wouldn't otherwise have.

Cheers
Tricia


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Congratulations, Tricia! Kim


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RE: Newspaper wrapped cuttings a success!

Hello everyone,

I just joined this forum. About a month ago I read about the newspaper method on some blog - which suggested leaving the bundles alone for 6 weeks. I think I did mine 4 weeks ago and stumbled on this thread today. I see that Kim suggests anything over 3 weeks is a no go. Well, I went and checked my three bundles. One of them was rotting :( The second one was all callused and rooted. The third bundle had a 50% callus and root rate the other 50% rotted. It is wet and cold here in the PNW. Any suggestions on how to protect my rooted ones for the rest of the winter and how long should I wait before planting outdoors? Any urgent suggestions are most welcome!!!

Thanks
Aranya


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