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Deadheading Question....

Posted by blazepepper Auburn, GA 7b (My Page) on
Sun, Jun 1, 08 at 9:18

I have planted several different perrinials in a bed this year. This is my first time working with flowers. Several varieties of Day Lillies, Black Eyed Susans, etc.
Now I have decided to mix in some annuals for some more color. My first question is specifically regarding Salvia's. I purchased red/white salvias from home depot in cell packs with little to no descriptive info. I've read that Salvia's need to be dead headed after the blooms start to fade to ensure more blooming. However, I see that there are lots of diff kinds of salvia? Any tips here would be helpful. Also, read in a Ga gardening magazine that some perrinials, such as the blac eyed susan should be sheared back as well after first blooms fade to made stalks sturdier and stocky?? Basically just looking for some guidence on how/if/when/why to dead head/trim, as it would be scary to go out and just start loping them off with all the time and money I have in them. That probably sounds rambling doesnt it? Thanks for any advice.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Deadheading Question....

There are several difference pruning methods each for specific kinds of Salvias.
We would need to know what you have to tell you the correct way to prune. I guess just taking off the spent blooms would be OK for any of them, but winter pruning is another matter entirely.


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RE: Deadheading Question....

I would cut off the spent flower stems if they look unattractive. Really you don't have to deadhead any salvia unless it makes them more attractive to you. You probably have Salvia splendens, which should bloom most of all of the summer and fall. This is an OK plant, but really a poor introduction to salvias, in my opinion, because it is not as vigorous or large and many of the others - it has been over-selected to the point where it is just another cute little annual. There are lots of great salvias that would be perennials for you in GA. I suggest you keep your eyes open for Salvia guaranitica, known as Anise Sage or one variety called 'Black and Blue' and also look for Salvia greggii, known as Texas Sage or several other names. These are really nice, long-blooming, easy garden plants that attract hummingbirds and i think you'll like them.

Black eyed susans can be cut back after they flower. Simply cut the stem that had flowers, removing the dead flower and any part of the stem that doesn't look nice. Keep your eyes open for additional buds on these stems, which will become flowers, and don't cut any new stems that may be emerging with new flowers. As with salvias, you don't have to deadhead Black eyed susans or any other flower, it just makes them look neater and perhaps bloom longer. The theory is that since you deadheaded and they aren't producing seed, which is their mission in life, they try to make more flowers and fulfil their mission. I think deadheading works pretty well at extending the bloom season of some plants, and has little effect on others. With salvias, it generally is not necessary and is not a real common practice among gardens I have visited.


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RE: Deadheading Question....

There is one good reason to deadhead some salvias - seeds. The guaraniticas don't reseed much, but the coccineas certainly do, as do many of the non-hybrid varieties. I deadhead those that produce large quantities of seed. I wasn't deadheading regularly last year, and I now have a lot of extra plants coming up, even in the lawn. Although I have been trying to trade them over on the plant exchange, I still have more than I want. I hate to toss them in the trash, so this year I am trying preventive maintenance.


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RE: Deadheading Question....

Hello, sorry I'm not following the topic but I need your advice how to post a question.I am new to this forum and can't find it.Please help:)Thank you so much!


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RE: Deadheading Question....

You got this far by registering and logging in. Just type in your question and subject heading in the boxes at the bottom of the page.


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RE: Deadheading Question....

I have snowflake salvia; tall white flowers. most of the flower stalks are turning brown now. do i leave them and new white flowers will appear or do i cut the whole piece off and a new one will grow back?


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